C Oliveira

University of Porto, Porto, Distrito do Porto, Portugal

Are you C Oliveira?

Claim your profile

Publications (30)135.52 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The aim of this work was to present the clinical and embryological outcomes of 65 azoospermic patients with non-mosaic Klinefelter syndrome (KS), treated by testicular sperm extraction (TESE), followed by intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), either with fresh or cryopreserved testicular spermatozoa. In total, spermatozoa were recovered in 25/65 (38.5%) of the cases. Of the 48 patients who choose to perform TESE followed by ICSI using fresh testicular spermatozoa (treatment TESE), spermatozoa was recovered in 19 patients (40%), with birth of 12 newborn. Of the 17 patients who choose to perform TESE followed by testicular sperm cryopreservation, spermatozoa were recovered in six patients (35%), with birth of one child. Of the patients who performed treatment TESE, nine went for a new cycle using cryopreserved spermatozoa. Of these, five patients had a previous failed treatment cycle (two patients, three newborn) and four with a previous success went for a new cycle (one patient, one newborn). Overall, the embryological and clinical rates were as follows: 52% of fertilization, 41% of blastocyst, 27% of implantation, 39% of live birth delivery and 47% of newborn. Of the 16 clinical pregnancies, 14 had a successful delivery (12 girls and 5 boys). The 17 newborns had a mean gestation time of 37.2 weeks (35.3% pre-term) and a mean newborn weight of 2781.3 g (37.5% low weight). Comparisons between cycles with fresh and frozen-thaw spermatozoa revealed higher fertilization and clinical pregnancy rates with fresh spermatozoa, with no differences regarding implantation or newborn rates. Of the 17 newborns, no abnormal karyotypes (n = 3) or numerical abnormalities in chromosomes 13, 18, 21, X and Y (n = 14) as evaluated by Multiplex Ligation–dependent Probe Amplification were observed. In conclusion, this study presents further data that reassures that men with KS have no increased risk of transmitting their genetic problem to the offspring.
    Andrology 07/2014; 2(4). · 3.37 Impact Factor
  • Source
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Summary Human oocyte dysmorphisms attain a large proportion of retrieved oocytes from assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatment cycles. Extracytoplasmic defects involve abnormal morphology of the zona pellucida (ZP), perivitelline space and first polar body. The aim of the present study was to describe a novel dysmorphism affecting the ZP, indented ZP. We also evaluated the clinical, embryological and ultrastructural features of these cases. We evaluated all ART treatment cycles during 7 consecutive years and found 13 treatment cycles (six patients) with all oocytes presenting an indented ZP. In addition, these oocytes presented total or partial absence of the perivitelline space, absence of resistance to ZP and oolemma penetration during microinjection, and low ooplasm viscosity during aspiration. This novel described dysmorphism was recurrent and attained all oocytes in three cases that had more than one treatment cycle. When compared with controls, data showed significant low oocyte maturity (42% versus 81.6%) and high cycle cancellation (30.8% versus 8.5%) rates, normal degeneration (3.4% versus 6.3%) and fertilization rates (69% versus 69.5%), and low pregnancy (15.4% versus 33.3%) and live-birth delivery (7.7% versus 27.7%) rates per cycle. Ultrastructure analysis revealed a zona pellucida structure with large empty electrolucent regions, an outer ZP layer with an indented surface with protuberances and a thick inner ZP that obliterated the perivitelline space. There was evidence of exocytosis of ZP material by the oocyte. In conclusion, oocytes with this novel described dysmorphism (indented ZP) are associated with low maturity, pregnancy and live-birth delivery rates.
    Zygote 09/2013; · 1.50 Impact Factor
  • Reproductive biomedicine online 05/2012; 24:S59. · 2.68 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Around 25-40% of cases of hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC) are caused by heterozygous E-cadherin (CDH1) germline mutations. The mechanisms for loss of the second allele still remain unclear. The aims of this study were to elucidate mechanisms for somatic inactivation of the wild-type CDH1 allele and to seek evidence for cadherin switching. Archival tumour material was analysed from 16 patients with CDH1 germline mutations and seven patients fulfilling HDGC criteria without CDH1 germline mutations. The 16 CDH1 exons were sequenced. E-cadherin promoter methylation was analysed by bisulphite sequencing and pyrosequencing and allele specificity was determined using polymorphic loci. Loss of heterozygosity was analysed using microsatellite markers. Cadherin expression levels were determined by real-time RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Six of 16 individuals with germline mutations had at least one second hit mechanism. Two exonic mutations (exon 9 truncating, exon 3 missense) and four intronic mutations which may affect splicing were identified. Tumours from 4/16 individuals had promoter hypermethylation that was restricted to the A allele haplotype in three cases. E-cadherin loss (mRNA and protein) generally correlated with identification of a second hit. In cases without germline E-cadherin mutations there was no evidence for somatic mutation or significant promoter methylation. P-cadherin (>25% cells) was expressed in 7/13 (54%) and 4/5 (80%) with and without germline CDH1 mutations, respectively, independent of complete E-cadherin loss. Overall, inactivation of the second CDH1 allele occurs by mutation and methylation events. Methylation is commonly allele-specific and is uncommon without germline mutations. P-cadherin over-expression commonly occurs in individuals with diffuse type gastric cancer.
    The Journal of Pathology 09/2008; 216(3):295-306. · 7.59 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Germline mutations in the gene encoding the tumour suppressor E-cadherin (CDH1) are the underlying genetic defect responsible for hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC). A remarkably high percentage ( approximately 80%) of CDH1 mutations in HDGC patients and carriers generate premature termination codons (PTCs). Here, we examined whether CDH1 transcripts harbouring PTCs are downregulated by nonsense-mediated decay (NMD), an RNA surveillance pathway that degrades PTC-bearing transcripts. Using an allele-specific expression (ASE) assay to differentiate between mutated and wild-type CDH1 alleles, we found that PTC-bearing CDH1 mRNAs are strongly downregulated in normal gastric tissue from several CDH1 mutation carriers. We show that NMD is responsible for this robust downregulation, as CDH1 transcripts harbouring PTCs in the KATO-III gastric tumour cell line were upregulated in response to protein synthesis inhibitors or depletion of the NMD factors UPF1 and eIF4AIII. Analysis of HDGC patients harbouring CDH1 alleles with PTCs at a wide variety of different positions indicates an association of their predicted ability to induce NMD and an earlier age of onset of gastric cancer. This suggests that NMD may be detrimental for HDGC patients and therefore NMD is a potentially useful therapeutic target for CDH1 mutation carriers.
    Oncogene 08/2008; 27(30):4255-60. · 8.56 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND & AIMS: In colorectal tumors, activating BRAF mutations occur alternative to KRAS oncogenic mutations, but in cell culture possess a much lower transforming capacity. Rac1b, a hyperactive Rac1 spliced variant, is over expressed in some colorectal tumors and activates the transcription factor nuclear factor-kappaB, which initiates a transcriptional response that promotes cell cycle progression and inhibits apoptosis. The aim of this study was to determine whether Rac1b overexpression is associated with B-Raf(V600E) in primary colorectal tumors and whether a functional cooperation between these 2 proteins exists in colorectal cells with a wild-type KRAS genotype. METHODS: Screening of BRAF and KRAS mutations by direct sequencing and Rac1b mRNA expression analysis by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction were conducted in 74 samples (13 normal colonic mucosa, 45 primary colorectal tumors, and 16 colorectal cancer [CRC] cell lines). RNA interference and focus formation assays were used to assess the cooperation between Rac1b and B-Raf(V600E) in cancer cell viability. RESULTS: Rac1b overexpression and B-Raf(V600E) are significantly associated in primary colorectal tumors (P = .008) and colorectal cell lines. The simultaneous suppression of both proteins dramatically decreased CRC cell viability through impaired cell-cycle progression and increased apoptosis. CONCLUSIONS: Our data demonstrate that Rac1b and B-Raf(V600E) functionally cooperate to sustain colorectal cell viability and suggest they constitute an alternative survival pathway to oncogenic K-Ras. These results reveal a novel molecular characteristic of colon tumors containing B-Raf mutations and should help in defining novel targets for cancer therapy.
    Gastroenterology 05/2008; 135(3):899-906. · 12.82 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: BRAF kinase is a downstream target of KRAS and activates the MAPK pathway. These two molecules are prone to mutations in sporadic microsatellite unstable (MSI) colorectal carcinomas (CRC) and BRAF V600E mutations are inversely associated with oncogenic KRAS mutations. The biological significance of BRAF V600E oncogenic activation is not well established in this type of tumour. We aimed to study proliferation and survival effects induced by BRAF inhibition in MSI CRC cell lines harbouring distinct genetic backgrounds (BRAF V600E or KRAS G13D). Suppression of BRAF in BRAF V600E MSI CRC cell lines by RNA interference significantly inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis, as demonstrated by BrdU incorporation and TUNEL assay, respectively. No significant differences were seen in proliferation and apoptosis, in cell lines harbouring KRAS G13D, after BRAF inhibition. We further analysed proliferation-associated molecules (pERK1/2, cyclin D1, p27 Kip1) and apoptosis-associated molecules (Bcl-2, Bax, pAkt, pBad, XIAP) in all cell lines. After BRAF down-regulation, we found a more pronounced decrease in ERK1/2 phosphorylation and cyclin D1 expression levels in BRAF-mutated cell lines in comparison to KRAS mutated cells. Upon BRAF inhibition, we also found an increase in p27(Kip1) levels and a more pronounced decrease in the levels of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2, specifically in cell lines with BRAF V600E. In conclusion, we have shown that MSI KRAS and BRAF mutant CRC cell lines respond differently to BRAF knockdown. This report provides evidence supporting BRAF as a good target for therapeutic intervention in patients with sporadic MSI CRC harbouring activating mutations in BRAF but not in KRAS.
    The Journal of Pathology 03/2008; 214(3):320-7. · 7.59 Impact Factor
  • F Carneiro, C Oliveira, G Suriano, R Seruca
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Gastric cancer is one of the major causes of cancer-related death worldwide. Familial clustering is observed in about 10% of cases; 1-3% of cases are hereditary. In the latter group, a syndrome which has been well characterised is hereditary diffuse gastric cancer; this is specifically associated with CDH1 (E-cadherin) germline mutations in about 30% of families. In this article, the state of the art of familial gastric cancer regarding the clinical, molecular and pathology features is reviewed, as well as the practical aspects for a correct diagnosis and clinical management.
    Journal of clinical pathology 02/2008; 61(1):25-30. · 2.43 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Serous borderline ovarian tumors (SBOTs) are differentiated, slow growing, noninvasive, and have a better prognosis than their invasive counterparts, but recurrence and progression to invasive carcinomas are common, and unlike high-grade serous carcinomas, they tend to be nonresponsive to chemotherapy. However, due to a lack of culture systems and animal models, information about the properties of SBOT and their changes with neoplastic progression is extremely limited. Our objective was to establish a cell culture model for SBOTs and to characterize their phenotype and genotype. We compared cultures derived from two SBOTs, one of which was a short-term culture containing a BRAF mutation but few other cytogenetic changes while the other culture developed into a spontaneously immortalized permanent cell line and had numerical and structural chromosomal abnormalities but lacked RAS/BRAF mutations. Both cultures formed whorl-like epithelial colonies and resembled low-grade invasive carcinomas by their secretion of CA125 and oviduct-specific glycoprotein, production of matrix metalloproteinases, E-cadherin expression, and telomerase activity. Other characteristics associated with neoplastic transformation, including invasiveness, anchorage-independent growth, and tumorigenicity, were not observed. Importantly, cell motility was reduced in both lines, likely contributing to the lack of invasiveness. The results reveal a striking phenotypic similarity between the two cell lines, regardless of their cytogenetic diversity, which suggests that their characteristic phenotype is regulated to a large degree by epigenetic and environmental factors. In conclusion, we have established the first permanent SBOT cell line, which provides a new model to elucidate the undefined relationship of SBOTs to invasive ovarian carcinomas.
    International Journal of Gynecological Cancer 02/2008; 18(6):1234-47. · 1.94 Impact Factor
  • Reproductive Biomedicine Online - REPROD BIOMED ONLINE. 01/2008; 16.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC) is a cancer susceptibility syndrome caused by E-cadherin germline mutations. One-third of these mutations are of the missense type, representing a burden in genetic counselling. A new germline missense mutation (P373L) was recently identified in a HDGC Italian family. The present work aimed at addressing the disease-causative nature of the P373L mutant. Assessment of the P373L mutation effect was based on cell aggregation and invasion assays. LOH analysis at the E-cadherin locus, search for somatic E-cadherin mutations and for promoter hypermethylation were performed to identify the mechanism of inactivation of the E-cadherin wild-type allele in the tumour. In vitro the P373L germline mutation impaired the E-cadherin functions. E-cadherin promoter hypermethylation was observed in the tumour of the P373L mutation carrier. We conclude that the combination of clinical, in vitro and molecular genetic data is helpful for establishing an accurate analysis of HDGC-associated CDH1 germline missense mutations and subsequently for appropriate clinical management of asymptomatic mutation carriers.
    European journal of surgical oncology: the journal of the European Society of Surgical Oncology and the British Association of Surgical Oncology 12/2007; 33(9):1061-7. · 2.56 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The cell surface glycoprotein E-cadherin (CDH1) is a key regulator of adhesive properties in epithelial cells. Germline mutations in CDH1 are well established as the defects underlying hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC) syndrome, and an increased risk of lobular breast cancer (LBC) has been described in HDGC kindreds. However, germline CDH1 mutations have not been described in patients with LBC in non-HDGC families. This study aimed to investigate the frequency of germline CDH1 mutations in patients with LBC with early onset disease or family histories of breast cancer without DGC. Germline DNA was analysed in 23 women with invasive lobular or mixed ductal and lobular breast cancers who had at least one close relative with breast cancer or had themselves been diagnosed before the age of 45 years, had tested negative for a germline BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation, and reported no personal or family history of diffuse gastric cancer. The full coding sequence of CDH1 including splice junctions was amplified using PCR and screened for mutations using DHPLC and sequencing. A novel germline CDH1 truncating mutation in the extracellular portion of the protein (517insA) was identified in one woman who had LBC at the age of 42 years and a first degree relative with invasive LBC. Germline CDH1 mutations can be associated with invasive LBC in the absence of diffuse gastric cancer. The finding, if confirmed, may have implications for management of individuals at risk for this breast cancer subtype. Clarification of the cancer risks in the syndrome is essential.
    Journal of Medical Genetics 12/2007; 44(11):726-31. · 5.70 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In sporadic colorectal cancer (CRC), KRAS are alternative to BRAF mutations and occur, respectively, in 30 and 10% of cases. Few reports addressed the association between KRAS–BRAF mutations and tumour progression specifically in sporadic microsatellite-stable (MSS) CRC. We screened KRAS and BRAF in 250 MSS primary CRC and 45 lymph node (LN) metastases and analysed the pathological features of the cases to understand the involvement of KRAS–BRAF activation in progression and metastasis. Forty-five per cent of primary MSS CRCs carried mutations in at least one of these genes and mutations were associated with wall invasion (P=0.02), presence and number of LN metastases (P=0.02 and P=0.03, respectively), distant metastases (P=0.004) and advanced stage (P=0.01). We demonstrated that KRAS and BRAF are alternative events in Tis and T1 MSS CRC and, KRAS rather than BRAF mutations, contributed to the progression of MSS CRC. The frequency of KRAS and/or BRAF mutations was higher in LN metastases than in primary carcinomas (P=0.0002). Mutated LN metastases displayed KRAS associated or not with BRAF mutations. BRAF mutations were never present as a single event. Concomitant KRAS and BRAF mutations increased along progression of MSS CRCs, suggesting that activation of both genes is likely to harbour a synergistic effect.Keywords: KRAS, BRAF, colorectal carcinoma, instability, MAP kinase, lymph node metastases
    Oncogene 09/2006; 26(1):158-163. · 8.56 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We report the association of CDH1/E-cadherin mutations with cleft lip, with or without cleft palate (CLP), in two families with hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC). In each family, the CDH1 mutation was a splicing mutation generating aberrant transcripts with an in-frame deletion, removing the extracellular cadherin repeat domains involved in cell-cell adhesion. Such transcripts might encode mutant proteins with trans-dominant negative effects. We found that CDH1 is highly expressed at 4 and 5 weeks in the frontonasal prominence, and at 6 weeks in the lateral and medial nasal prominences of human embryos, and is therefore expressed during the critical stages of lip and palate development. These findings suggest that alteration of the E-cadherin pathway can contribute to human clefting.
    Journal of Medical Genetics 03/2006; 43(2):138-42. · 5.70 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Vitrification of human blastocysts has been successfully applied using grids, straws and cryoloops. We assessed the survival rate of human compacted morulae and early blastocysts vitrified in pipette tips with a smaller inner diameter and solution volume than the previously described open pulled straw (OPS) method. Excess day 5 human embryos (n = 63) were experimentally vitrified in vessels. Embryos were incubated at 37 degrees C with sperm preparation medium (SPM) for 1 min, SPM + 7.5% ethylene glycol (EG)/dimethylsulphoxide (DMSO) for 3 min, and SPM + 16.5% EG + 16.5% DMSO + 0.67 mol/l sucrose for 25 s. They were then aspirated (0.5 microl) into a plastic micropipette tip (0.36 mm inner diameter), exposed to liquid nitrogen (LN(2)) vapour for 2 min before being placed into a pre-cooled cryotube, which was then closed and plunged into LN(2). Embryos were warmed and diluted using 0.33 mol/l and 0.2 mol/l sucrose. The survival rate for compacted morulae was 73% (22/30) and 82% (27/33) for early blastocysts. The survival rates of human compacted morulae and early blastocysts after vitrification with this simple technique are similar to those reported in the literature achieved by slow cooling and other vitrification protocols.
    Human Reproduction 03/2004; 19(2):300-5. · 4.67 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Changes in the pattern of DNA methylation are among the most common alterations observed in human cancers, such as gastric carcinomas. We analysed in a series of 51 sporadic gastric carcinomas the methylation status of the promoter regions of the hMLH1, CDH1, MGMT and COX2 genes. We aimed to determine the frequency of CpG island hypermethylation and to find out whether the occurrence of concurrent hypermethylation is related to the clinicopathological features of the gastric carcinomas. Using methylation-sensitive restriction analysis/polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and methylation-specific PCR (MSP) strategies, we searched for the presence of hypermethylation on the promoter region of the 4 selected genes. All showed hypermethylation of their promoter regions with frequencies of 37, 51, 61 and 29% for hMLH1, CDH1, MGMT and COX2, respectively. Concurrent hypermethylation was more frequently observed in MSI-H (P=0.0005) and diploid (P=0.029) tumours. Hypermethylation of hMLH1 was associated with MSI-H tumours (P=0.0001), whereas hypermethylation of MGMT was associated with MSI-H (p=0.021) and diploid tumours (p=0.012). Our results indicate that concurrent hypermethylation is a common event in gastric cancer, suggesting that global methylation changes play an important role in the development of sporadic gastric carcinoma. Moreover, inactivation of different gene promoters by hypermethylation is significantly associated with microsatellite instability (MSI-H) and diploidy: hMLH1 determines MSI-H and MGMT the diploid status of gastric carcinomas.
    European Journal of Cancer 07/2003; 39(9):1222-7. · 5.06 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A retrospective study was carried out on 159 treatment cycles in 148 secretory azoospermic patients to determine whether histopathological secretory azoospermic subgroups were predictive for gamete retrieval, and to evaluate outcome of microinjection using fresh or frozen-thawed testicular sperm and spermatids. Sperm and spermatids were recovered by open testicular biopsy and microinjected into oocytes. Fertilization and pregnancy rates were assessed. In hypoplasia, 97.7% of the 44 patients had late spermatids/sperm recovered. In maturation-arrest (MA; 47 patients), 31.9% had complete MA, and 68.1% incomplete MA due to a focus of early (36.2%) or late (31.9%) spermiogenesis. Gamete retrieval was achieved in 53.3, 41.2 and 93.3% of the cases respectively. In Sertoli cell-only syndrome (SCOS; 57 patients), 61.4% were complete SCOS, whereas incomplete SCOS cases showed one focus of MA (5.3%), or of early (29.8%) and late (3.5%) spermiogenesis. Only 29.8% of the patients had a successful gamete retrieval, 2.9% in complete and 77.3% in incomplete SCOS cases. In total, there were 87 ICSI, 39 elongated spermatid injection (ELSI) and 33 round spermatid injection (ROSI) treatment cycles, with mean values of fertilization rate of 71.4, 53.6 and 17%, and clinical pregnancy rates of 31.7, 26.3 and 0% respectively. Histopathological subgroups were positively correlated with successful gamete retrieval. No major outcome differences were observed between testicular sperm and elongated spermatids, either fresh or frozen-thawed. However, injection of intact round-spermatids showed very low rates of fertilization and no pregnancies.
    Human Reproduction 08/2002; 17(7):1800-10. · 4.67 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Interleukin (IL)-1 gene cluster proinflammatory polymorphisms have been associated with development of gastric atrophy and with increased risk of gastric carcinoma. We aimed to determine the association between IL-1 loci polymorphisms and increased risk of gastric carcinoma in samples from a Portuguese population, and to find whether there was any relationship with the histologic types of gastric carcinoma. In a case-control study including 220 controls and 152 patients with gastric carcinoma (intestinal, 76; diffuse, 37; and atypical, 39), both the IL-1B-511 biallelic polymorphism and the IL-1RN penta-allelic variable number of tandem repeats were genotyped. We found a significant association between the IL-1 polymorphisms and increased risk for tumor development in patients with intestinal-type gastric carcinoma. A trend towards an increased risk of tumor development was also observed in patients with diffuse-type gastric carcinoma. No significant relationship was observed in patients with atypical carcinoma. Carriers of IL-1B-511T and IL-1RN*2 homozygotes had increased risk for developing intestinal-type gastric carcinoma with odds ratios of 2.7 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.5-4.9) and 3.1 (95% CI, 1.5-6.5), respectively. Statistical analysis showed an interaction between the 2 loci with the risk conferred by the IL-1B-511T allele substantially increased (odds ratio, 9.0; 95% CI, 3.5-23.0) in individuals homozygous for the IL-1RN*2 allele. Our results provide further support to the association between IL-1 gene cluster proinflammatory polymorphisms and increased risk of gastric carcinoma. Furthermore, we found evidence pointing to the existence of a synergistic interaction between the IL-1B and IL-1RN polymorphisms.
    Gastroenterology 10/2001; 121(4):823-9. · 12.82 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In diffuse gastric carcinoma, despite common E-cadherin gene (CDH1) mutations, tumors show absence of CDH1 loss of heterozigosity (LOH) in most cases. This observation challenges the classical two-hit model of tumor suppressor gene inactivation. In order to investigate whether or not CDH1 promoter methylation may function as the second hit we analysed a series of 23 sporadic gastric carcinomas for the presence of CDH1 mutations, CDH1 promoter methylation, LOH and E-cadherin expression. CDH1 mutations were detected in nine of the 16 (56.3%) diffuse gastric carcinomas and in none of the seven intestinal gastric carcinomas. In diffuse gastric carcinomas harboring CDH1 mutations, LOH was observed in a single case. Loss of plasma membrane E-cadherin expression was consistently found in all nine cases with CDH1 mutation, suggesting that tumors inactivated the remaining CDH1 allele via a different mechanism. CDH1 promoter methylation was observed in nine of the 16 (56.3%) diffuse-type gastric carcinoma cases, including six of the nine cases (66.7%) harboring CDH1 mutations. CDH1 promoter methylation was also seen in two (28.6%) intestinal-type cases. Our results show that CDH1 promoter methylation is the second hit in more than half of the sporadic diffuse gastric carcinoma cases harboring CDH1 mutations.
    Oncogene 04/2001; 20(12):1525-8. · 8.56 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

1k Citations
135.52 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1998–2013
    • University of Porto
      • • Department of Microscopy
      • • Institute of Molecular Pathology and Immunology (IPATIMUP)
      • • Faculdade de Medicina
      Porto, Distrito do Porto, Portugal
  • 2006
    • Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Rouen
      Rouen, Upper Normandy, France
  • 2004
    • Hospital General Universitario de Alicante
      Alicante, Valencia, Spain
  • 2001
    • University of Cambridge
      • Department of Oncology
      Cambridge, England, United Kingdom