B Dervaux

Lille Catholic University, Lille, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France

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Publications (43)68.56 Total impact

  • Laurent Carnis, Nicolas Vaillant, Benoît Dervaux
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    ABSTRACT: This article analyses the heterogeneous character of compensation amounts awarded by insurance companies and the courts. The information source – the Association for Insurance Risk Information (AGIRA) database – covers all surviving victims of injuries resulting from road accidents in France over the period 2002 to 2008. Three results emerge: first, compensation amounts awarded under different headings – Partial Permanent Incapacity (PPI), solatium (emotional harm), disfigurement and loss of amenity – are not determined independently of each other; second, victim characteristics, notably age and sex, play a major part; and third, inequalities of treatment across the country are strikingly low.
    Applied Economics Letters - APPL ECON LETTERS. 01/2013; 20(1):28-33.
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    ABSTRACT: Sacral nerve modulation (SNM) is an established treatment for urinary and fecal incontinence in patients for whom conservative management has failed. This study assessed the outcome and cost analysis of SNM compared to alternative medical and surgical treatments. Clinical outcome and cost-effectiveness analyses were performed in parallel with a prospective, multicenter cohort study that included 369 consecutive patients with urge urinary and/or fecal incontinence. The duration of follow-up was 24 months, and costs were estimated from the national health perspective. Cost-effectiveness outcomes were expressed as incremental costs per 50% of improved severity scores (incremental cost-effectiveness ratio). The SNM significantly improved the continence status (P < 0.005) and quality of life (P < 0.05) of patients with urge urinary and/or fecal incontinence compared to alternative treatments. The average cost of SNM for urge urinary incontinence was ∈8525 (95% confidence interval, ∈6686-∈10,364; P = 0.001) more for the first 2 years compared to alternative treatments. The corresponding increase in cost for subjects with fecal incontinence was ∈6581 (95% confidence interval, ∈2077-∈11,084; P = 0.006). When an improvement of more than 50% in the continence severity score was used as the unit of effectiveness, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for SNM was ∈94,204 and ∈185,160 at 24 months of follow-up for urinary and fecal incontinence, respectively. The SNM is a cost-effective treatment for urge urinary and/or fecal incontinence.
    Annals of surgery 04/2011; 253(4):720-32. · 7.90 Impact Factor
  • Energy Economics - ENERG ECON. 01/2011; 59.
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    ABSTRACT: The percentage of compliant continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP)-treated apnoeic patients that continue to experience residual excessive sleepiness (RES) is unknown. RES was defined by an Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) score of >or=11. In total, 502 patients from 37 French sleep centres using CPAP >3 h night(-1) attending their 1-yr follow-up visit were eligible. ESS and polysomnographic data as well as symptoms, quality of life, depression scores and objective CPAP compliance at 1 yr were collected. Overall, 60 patients remained sleepy on CPAP (ESS 14.3+/-2.5) leading to a prevalence rate of RES of 12.0% (95% confidence interval (CI) 9.1-14.8). After having excluded associated restless leg syndrome, major depressive disorder and narcolepsy as confounding causes, the final prevalence rate of RES was 6.0% (95% CI 3.9-8.01). Patients with RES were younger and more sleepy at diagnosis. The relative risk of having RES was 5.3 (95% CI 1.6-22.1), when ESS before treatment was >or=11. Scores of emotional and energy Nottingham Health Profile domains were two times worse in patients with RES. As 230,000 obstructive sleep apnoea patients are currently treated in France by continuous positive airway pressure, more than 13,800 of them might suffer from residual excessive sleepiness.
    European Respiratory Journal 05/2009; 33(5):1062-7. · 6.36 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: By using a novel adaptation of the free-disposable hull analysis of productivity, we assess the medical and technical efficiency of patient care in 25 Parisian intensive care units (ICUs) during 2000. The robust free disposable hull (RFDH) as defined by [Cazals et al., 2002. Nonparametric frontier estimation: a robust approach. Journal of Econometrics 106, 1-25] reduces the impact outliers may have on findings by employing Monte-Carlo techniques and repeated sample selection. Among our key findings, there was no overall significant correlation between medical and technical efficiencies for all the ICUs, therefore performing well in one does not guarantee good performance in the other. We also found that over 80% of inefficiency is concentrated in less than 20% of the sampled patients.
    International Journal of Production Economics 01/2009; 120(2):585-594. · 2.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Capitalizing on available data, we used a decision model to estimate the clinical and economic outcomes associated with early initiation of treatment with neuraminidase inhibitors in all patients with influenza-like illnesses ( ILI ) (systematic strategy) vs. only those at high risk of complications (targeted strategy). Systematic treatment of ILI during an A(H1N1)v influenza epidemic wave is both effective and cost-effective. Patients who present to care with ILI during an A(H1N1)v influenza epidemic wave should initiate treatment with neuraminidase inhibitors, regardless of risk status. Administering neuraminidase inhibitors between epidemic waves, when the probability of influenza is low, is less effective and cost-effective.
    PLoS currents. 01/2009; 1:RRN1121.
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    ABSTRACT: The objective was to assess the medicoeconomic impact of initial and subsequent treatments based on oral fludarabine, intravenous chemotherapy (mini-CHOP) and chlorambucil in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia. A Markov model has been defined to encompass the 18 strategies over a 3-year period after starting the first treatment. Costs of treatments, side effects and follow-up have been calculated by crossing data from published prospective trials, specific hospital databases and French resource-based relative value scales. When treatments were based on mini-CHOP, different possibilities offered for hospital care were taken into account. Probalistic sensitivity analysis was performed. Whatever the modality of hospital care for mini-CHOP, the strategies based on oral fludarabine as first-line treatment are not only more effective but are also cost effective and dominate other types of scenarios. Fludarabine given orally should be preferred to mini-CHOP or chlorambucil as a first-line treatment for patients with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia.
    10/2008; 10(4):339-354.
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    ABSTRACT: The objective of the study was to assess and to explain variation of organizational performance in intensive care units (ICUs). This was a prospective multicenter study. The study involved 26 ICUs located in the Paris area, France, participating in a regional database. Data were collected through answers of 1000 ICU personnel to the Culture, Organization, and Management in Intensive Care questionnaire and from the database. Organizational performance was assessed through a composite score related to 5 dimensions: coordination and adaptation to uncertainty, communication, conflict management, organizational change, and organizational learning, Skills developed in relationship with patients and their families. Statistical comparisons between ICUs were performed by analysis of variance with a Scheffé pairwise procedure. A multilevel regression model was used to analyze both individual and structural variables explaining differences of ICU's organizational performance. The organizational performance score differed among ICUs. Some cultural values were negatively correlated with a high level of organizational performance, suggesting improvement potential. Several individual and structural factors were also related to the quality of ICU organization, including absence of burnout, older staff, satisfaction to work, and high workload (P < .02 for each). A benchmarking approach can be used by ICU managers to assess the organizational performance of their ICU based on a validated questionnaire. Differences are mainly explained by cultural values and individual well-being factors, introducing new requirements for managing human resources in ICUs.
    Journal of Critical Care 07/2008; 23(2):236-44. · 2.50 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The clinical impact of surgical site infections (SSI) and postoperative pneumonia (PP) after head and neck cancer surgery has been assessed in the past, but little is known about their economic impact. The present study was designed to evaluate costs related to SSI and PP after head and neck cancer surgery with opening of mucosa. The incidence of SSI and PP was measured in a prospective cohort of 261 patients who had undergone head and neck cancer surgery. The additional direct medical costs related to these infections from the hospital perspective were determined based on postoperative length of stay. The mean direct hospital costs for patients with and without SSI or PP were compared. Of the 261 patients, 81 (31%), 21 (8%) and 13 (5%) developed SSI, PP or both, respectively. The additional lengths of stay attributable to SSI, PP or both were 16, 17 and 31 days, respectively, and additional direct medical costs related to these conditions were 17,000, 19,000 and 35,000 Euros. Nosocomial infections after head and neck cancer surgery significantly increase patients' length of stay and therefore generate additional direct medical costs. These results support the application of preventive interventions to reduce nosocomial infections in this setting.
    International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery 03/2008; 37(2):135-9. · 1.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To assess the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of routine childhood vaccination by new vaccines against rotavirus in France. We constructed a Markov decision tree to compare two alternatives: "no vaccination" and "vaccination". A hypothetical birth cohort of 750,000 children was followed until 3 years of age. First, the disease burden without vaccine was estimated using data from French databases and medical literature. Incidence rates in unvaccinated children were modelled as a function of age and seasons. Next, using data from the medical literature, the vaccine's protective effect on rotavirus diarrhoea was considered. A routine universal rotavirus immunization programme was estimated capable of annually avoiding 89,000 cases of diarrhoea, 10,500 hospitalizations, and 8 deaths. At a vaccination cost of euro 150/course, assuming 75% vaccine coverage, the programme would cost euro 95 million and involve a net loss of euro 68 million to the health care system. The vaccination programme would cost euro 298,000/year of life saved, and euro 138,000/QALY saved. Key variables affecting the results were disease incidence, mortality rates and vaccine price. In France, childhood rotavirus vaccination with new anti-rotavirus vaccines would reduce the morbidity burden of rotavirus infection, but would not be cost-effective unless the price of vaccine decreased considerably.
    Vaccine 02/2008; 26(5):706-15. · 3.49 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Varicella is a universal childhood disease in Spain, causing approximately 400,000 cases, 1,500 hospitalizations and 15 deaths every year. The aim of this study is to determine the economic impact of childhood varicella vaccination on the burden of disease and associated costs by using a dynamic model. The analysis is based on the varicella transmission model developed by Halloran and adapted to the Spanish context. Cost data (Euro, 2004) were derived from previous studies and official tariffs. Two vaccination scenarios were analysed: (1) routine vaccination program for children aged 1-2 years, and (2) routine vaccination program for children aged 1-2 years completed by a catch-up program during the first year of vaccine marketing for children aged 2-11 years. The analysis considers that a similar coverage rate to the MMR one would be achieved (97.15%). A societal perspective, including direct and indirect costs, and a health care payor perspective were adopted. A probabilistic sensitivity analysis was performed. A routine vaccination program has a positive impact on varicella-related morbidity: the number of varicella cases is estimated to be reduced by 89%, and 1230 hospitalizations are prevented. From the societal perspective, scenario (1) is cost-saving whether or not indirect costs are considered (-51 and -4%, respectively). From the Health Care System the strategy is cost-effective, with a cost-effectiveness ratio estimated at 3,982 Euro per life-year gained, although it leads to a small increase in the costs. Considering the impact of vaccination on morbidity and costs, a routine childhood vaccination program against varicella is worth while in Spain without taking into account the potential impact on HZ.
    Vaccine 12/2006; 24(47-48):6980-9. · 3.49 Impact Factor
  • Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology 12/2006; 27(11):1282-5. · 4.02 Impact Factor
  • J P Marissal, B Gueron, B Dervaux
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    ABSTRACT: A well-known methodology used to compute the macroeconomic cost of risk factors is the etiologic cost ratio, leading to estimates based on data on the prevalence of the risk factor in the general population, the relative risk of complications associated to it and the cost of the complications. A major problem of this method is that it is in some extent inconsistent with recent findings showing an increase in the per capita cost of some complications in presence of type II diabetes mellitus. The aim of the paper is to reconcile the approach with most recent economic studies and to overview the consequences of such an attempt in terms of methodological framework. We developed a methodological framework introducing heterogeneity in the cost of treating complications according to the presence of diabetes. We estimated the macroeconomic cost of type II diabetes mellitus based on selected complications (stroke, myocardial infarction, nephropathy and peripheral arterial obstructive disease) from French representative data in two situations: a situation in which the heterogeneity is not taken into account, another situation in which heterogeneity is introduced. Our results point out that the assumption of homogeneity in the cost of complications is associated to an underestimation of the cost of diabetes by about 30%. Our results present an attempt to reconcile the economic modeling of the cost of type II diabetes mellitus with the "real world". We conclude that the introduction of heterogeneity is necessary to capture the whole extent of the economic burden of the disease and that it places significant constraints on the data and the methodological framework to be used in such attempts.
    Revue d Épidémiologie et de Santé Publique 05/2006; 54(2):137-47. · 0.69 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In this paper, we show that the ratio of the number of fetal anomalies detected by ultrasounds (US) to the total number of cases is not a consistent estimator of the US sensitivity. As Eddy 1 pointed out, when the disease evolves over time, the sensitivity of a test also varies over time according to the development of the disease. To assess correctly the detection capability of a test, it is therefore necessary to estimate a time continuous function (sensitivity function) instead of a single parameter. From a methodological point of view, by considering the “detectability” time of a fetal anomaly as a random variable and parametrizing its distribution function, we estimate the probability that an anomaly is detected conditional upon the precise timing of actually performed US during pregnancy. We fit this model with Eurofetus data (about 7,300 abnormal fetuses), and we compare estimations for different kinds of anomalies (classification based on the system involved and/or severity of the handicap). To allow for heterogeneity of anomalies regarding the detectability time, we generally adopt mixture models. For instance, we select a bi-gamma distribution for major malformations and estimate that 63% of such anomalies are detectable quite early in pregnancy (conditional mean: 15.2 weeks of amenorrhea (WA) ± 4.2 WA), the others becoming detectable later (30.3 WA ± 6.4 WA). Such results are then integrated in a cost-effectiveness analysis.
    Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 02/2006; 847(1):125 - 135. · 4.38 Impact Factor
  • J.-P. Marissal, B. Gueron, B. Dervaux
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    ABSTRACT: Background A well-known methodology used to compute the macroeconomic cost of risk factors is the etiologic cost ratio, leading to estimates based on data on the prevalence of the risk factor in the general population, the relative risk of complications associated to it and the cost of the complications. A major problem of this method is that it is in some extent inconsistent with recent findings showing an increase in the per capita cost of some complications in presence of type II diabetes mellitus. The aim of the paper is to reconcile the approach with most recent economic studies and to overview the consequences of such an attempt in terms of methodological framework. Methods We developed a methodological framework introducing heterogeneity in the cost of treating complications according to the presence of diabetes. We estimated the macroeconomic cost of type II diabetes mellitus based on selected complications (stroke, myocardial infarction, nephropathy and peripheral arterial obstructive disease) from French representative data in two situations: a situation in which the heterogeneity is not taken into account, another situation in which heterogeneity is introduced. Results Our results point out that the assumption of homogeneity in the cost of complications is associated to an underestimation of the cost of diabetes by about 30%. Conclusion Our results present an attempt to reconcile the economic modeling of the cost of type II diabetes mellitus with the “real world”. We conclude that the introduction of heterogeneity is necessary to capture the whole extent of the economic burden of the disease and that it places significant constraints on the data and the methodological framework to be used in such attempts.
    Revue D Epidemiologie Et De Sante Publique - REV EPIDEMIOL SANTE PUBL. 01/2006; 54(2):137-147.
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    ABSTRACT: In this paper, data envelopment analysis (DEA) techniques are applied to the French nursing home industry in order to address two policy issues. The first involves nursing home size and returns to scale, while the second deals with the potential effects of a change in nursing home reimbursement from a flat rate to one based on the severity of case-mix. To accomplish this, our analysis expands on the existing nursing home literature to analyze technical and allocative efficiency along with budget-constrained models rather than the more common direct input-based distance function. Technical efficiency is evaluated via an indirect output distance function while allocative output efficiency is computed with a cost indirect revenue function. The findings suggest that system-wide efficiency and equity may result from coming reforms since payments would more accurately reflect resource use.
    Socio-Economic Planning Sciences. 01/2006;
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of the study was to assess the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of the FEC 100 compared with the FEC 50 in the FASG05 trial. A cost-effectiveness analysis was performed using a multi-state Markov process model. Relevant clinical data introduced into the model were obtained from 10-year follow-up of the clinical trial FASG05. Survival curves for each health state were assessed by survival parametric model. The model allowed assessments from the start of adjuvant chemotherapy until death. The costs of adjuvant treatment and follow-up were estimated. The costs of recurrence were evaluated from the medical records of 146 patients. A prospective survey was performed on a cohort of 87 patients to quantify the resources external to the hospital (including cost of transportation). The inpatient costs were evaluated using the French diagnosis-related groups. The ambulatory costs were assessed using the French nomenclature. Costs were expressed in 2002 Euro (), according to the French societal perspective. The ICER assessed the cost of one additional life year saved. A discount rate of 5% per year was used for cost, and alternatively 0%, 3% and 5% for effectiveness. We validated the results with a probabilistic sensitivity analysis incorporating parametric and non-parametric bootstraps, and with the acceptability curves. The mean total discounting cost of adjuvant treatments was 11 465 for FEC 50 and 13 815 for FEC 100; the mean total discounting cost of recurrences was 14 636 and 13 503, respectively. According to the discount rate of effectiveness, the life expectancy was 16.5, 11.4 and 9.3 years for FEC 50 and 18.4, 12.5 and 10.2 years for FEC 100. The ICER (cost per life year saved) were 642, 1084 and 1460, respectively. The probability according to which FEC 50 is strictly dominated by FEC 100 was 0.15. The clinical benefit of FEC 100 generates a negligible cost increase when compared with FEC 50.
    Annals of Oncology 07/2005; 16(6):915-22. · 7.38 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The objective of this study is to develop and validate a questionnaire designed to assess the culture, organization, and management of intensive care units. This is a prospective multicenter study. The study was conducted in 26 intensive care units located in Paris. All personnel were asked to complete the questionnaire. The questionnaire was developed in 2 steps: (1) development of a theoretical framework based on organizational theory and (2) testing of the reliability and validity of a comprehensive set of measures. The internal consistency of the items composing each scale was tested by using the Cronbach alpha. Convergent, and discriminant validity was assessed by factor analysis with varimax rotation. The overall completion rate was 74% with 1000 respondents (750 nurses, 26 head nurses, 168 physicians, and 56 medical secretaries). Starting with a 220-item questionnaire, we constructed a short version-conserving metrological characteristics with good reliability and validity. The short questionnaire, entitled Culture, Organization, and Management in Intensive Care, consists of 106 items distributed in 9 dimensions and 22 scales: culture (n = 3), coordination and adaptation to uncertainty (n = 3), communication (n = 3), problem solving and conflict management (n = 2), organizational learning and organizational change (n = 2), skills developed in a patient-caregiver relationship (n = 1), subjective unit performance (n = 3), burnout (n = 3), and job satisfaction and intention to quit (n = 2). All the scales showed good-to-high reliability, with Cronbach alpha scores higher than .7 (with the exception of coordination [.6]). Team satisfaction-oriented culture is positively correlated with good managerial practices and individual well-being. The Culture, Organization, and Management in Intensive Care questionnaire enables staff and managers to assess the organizational performance of their intensive care unit.
    Journal of Critical Care 07/2005; 20(2):126-38. · 2.50 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective:  To determine the economic impact of childhood varicella vaccination in France and Germany.Methods:  A common methodology based on the use of a varicella transmission model was used for the two countries. Cost data (2002‰) were derived from two previous studies. The analysis focused on a routine vaccination program for which three different coverage rates (CRs) were considered (90%, 70%, and 45%). Catch-up strategies were also analyzed. A societal perspective including both direct and indirect costs and a third-party payer perspective were considered (Social Security in France and Sickness Funds in Germany).Results:  A routine vaccination program has a clear positive impact on varicella-related morbidity in both countries. With a 90% CR, the number of varicella-related deaths was reduced by 87% in Germany and by 84% in France. In addition, with a CR of 90%, routine varicella vaccination induces savings in both countries from both societal (Germany 61%, France 60%) and third-party payer perspectives (Germany 51%, France 6.7%). For lower CRs, routine vaccination remains cost saving from a third-party payer perspective in Germany but not in France, where it is nevertheless cost-effective (cost per life-year gained of 6521‰ in the base case with a 45% CR).Conclusion:  Considering the impact of vaccination on varicella morbidity and costs, a routine varicella vaccination program appears to be cost saving in Germany and France from both a societal and a third-party payer perspective. For France, routine varicella vaccination remains cost-effective in worst cases when a third-party payer perspective is adopted. Catch-up programs provide additional savings.
    Value in Health 05/2005; 8(3):209 - 222. · 2.19 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To construct and validate an update of the Simplified Acute Physiology Score II (SAPS II) for the evaluation of clinical performance of Intensive Care Units (ICU). Retrospective analysis of prospectively collected multicenter data in 32 ICUs located in the Paris area belonging to the Cub-Rea database and participating in a performance evaluation project. 33,471 patients treated between 1999 and 2000. Two logistic regression models based on SAPS II were developed to estimate in-hospital mortality among ICU patients. The second model comprised reevaluation of original items of SAPS II and integration of the preadmission location and chronic comorbidity. Internal and external validation were performed. In the two validation samples the most complex model had better calibration than the original SAPS II for in-hospital mortality but its discrimination was not significantly higher (area under ROC curve 0.89 vs. 0.87 for SAPS II). Second-level customization and integration of new items improved uniformity of fit for various categories of patients except for diagnosis-related groups. The rank order of ICUs was modified according to the model used. The overall performance of SAPS II derived models was good, even in the context of a community cohort and routinely gathered data. However, one-half the variation of outcome remains unexplained after controlling for admission characteristics, and uniformity of prediction across diagnostic subgroups was not achieved. Differences in case-mix still limit comparisons of quality of care.
    Intensive Care Medicine 04/2005; 31(3):416-23. · 5.26 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

238 Citations
68.56 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1994–2009
    • Lille Catholic University
      Lille, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France
  • 2008
    • French Institute of Health and Medical Research
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
    • Institut de recherches économiques et sociales
      Noisy, Île-de-France, France
    • University of Lille Nord de France
      Lille, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France
  • 2005
    • Hôpital Ambroise Paré – Hôpitaux universitaires Paris Ile-de-France Ouest
      Billancourt, Île-de-France, France
    • French National Centre for Scientific Research
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
    • Centre Oscar Lambret
      Lille, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France