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Publications (5)30.06 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Human leukocyte antigen G (HLA-G) molecules exhibit immunomodulatory properties corresponding to nonclassic class I genes of the major histocompatibility complex. They are either membrane-bound or solubly expressed during certain tumoral malignancies. Soluble human leukocyte antigen G (sHLA-G) molecules seem more frequently expressed than membrane-bound isoforms during hematologic malignancies, such as lymphoproliferative disorders. Assay of these molecules by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in patients suffering from another hematologic disorder (acute leukemia) highlights increased sHLA-G secretion. This increased secretion seems more marked in acute leukemia subtypes affecting monocytic and lymphoid lineages such as FABM4 and FABM5, as well as both B and T acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Moreover, this study uses in vitro cytokine stimulations and reveals the respective potential roles of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and interferon-gamma in increasing this secretion in FABM4 and ALL. Correlations between sHLA-G plasma level and clinical biologic features suggest a link between elevated sHLA-G level and 1) the absence of anterior myelodysplasia and 2) high-level leukocytosis. All these findings suggest that sHLA-G molecules could be a factor in tumoral escape from immune survey during acute leukemia.
    Neoplasia (New York, N.Y.) 04/2006; 8(3):223-30. · 5.48 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Most patients with localized high-grade non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) can be cured with or without adjuvant radiotherapy. However few data are available on the long-term outcome of these patients. Here we report the results of a prospective study, started in 1984, which was conducted to evaluate the long-term outcome of patients with localized high-grade NHL. In this multicenter, prospective study by the GOELAMS group, 253 patients with localized high-grade NHL were treated with 3 cycles of vindesine, cyclophosphamide, adriamycin and prednisone (VCAP, a high-dose CHOP regimen) followed by involved field radiotherapy (40 Gy). After completion of chemotherapy, 213 patients (84%) entered complete remission (CR) and 30 (12%) obtained a partial remission. Treatment failed in 6 patients (2.5%) and there were 4 toxic deaths (1.5%). Following radiotherapy, 239 (94%) of all patients were in CR. With a median follow-up of 88 months, overall survival and disease-free survival rates were 84% and 85% respectively at five years, and 78% and 82% respectively at ten years. The response to chemotherapy was decisive to survival. We observed 43 relapses (17%) at a median time of 20 months after CR, and 9 patients relapsed after five years. Eleven patients (3%) developed another malignancy in the follow-up period. High-dose CHOP followed by locoregional radiotherapy is a feasible treatment for localized high-grade NHL. It has very few complications, a good CR rate and the OS is 78% at 10 years.
    Haematologica 07/2005; 90(6):802-9. · 5.94 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Multidrug resistance protein (MRP) activity was investigated in 44 newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) patients using a functional assay based on efflux of carboxy-2',7'-dichlorofluorescein, an anionic dye handled by both MRP1 and MRP2. Elevated MRP transport was detected in 29% of cases, but was not significantly correlated with sex, age, white blood cell count at diagnosis or karyotype. In contrast, it was associated with secondary AML (P = 0.002), CD34 positivity (P = 0.041) and P-glycoprotein activity (P = 0.01). There was a lower rate of complete remission in MRP-positive patients versus MRP-negative patients (23% versus 81%; P = 0.001); overall survival was also better for MRP-negative patients (P = 0.004). These data indicate a probable role for MRP activity in the clinical outcome of AML.
    British Journal of Haematology 04/2002; 116(4):834-8. · 4.94 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The blastic variant (BV) form of mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is considered to be a very aggressive subtype of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). In order to determine its clinico-biological features and response to therapy we studied 33 patients (17%) out of 187 suffering from MCL who were diagnosed with a BV of MCL. Blastic variant was diagnosed according to histopathological patterns, immunophenotyping, and bcl1 gene rearrangement and/or cyclin D1 overexpression. Three patients initially diagnosed with large cell NHL were classified as BV. Patients received front-line therapy including CHOP-like regimen or CVP (n = 29), or chlorambucil (n = 4) and CHOP or ESAP as second-line therapy. High-dose intensification with stem cell transplantation (SCT) was performed in 11 cases (autoSCT, n = 8; alloSCT, n = 3). All but two patients were in complete remission (CR) at the time of transplant (CR1, n = 5; CR2, n = 4). Clinical and biological characteristics did not differ from those of the common form of MCL. The median age was 62 years (29-80), with a sex ratio (M/F) of 2.6:1. Of the 33 patients, 66% had extranodal site involvement, 85% had an Ann Arbor stage IV, and 82% had peripheral lymphadenopathy. Circulating lymphomatous cells were seen in 48% of cases. Twelve patients (36%) entered a CR1 with a median duration of 11 months. Fifteen patients (46%) failed to respond and rapidly died of progressive disease. Second-line therapy led to a 26% (6/23) CR2 rate. Nine patients relapsed after high-dose therapy. Twenty-two of the 33 patients (66%) died of refractory or progressive disease. Median overall survival (OS) time was 14.5 months for the 33 BV patients as compared to 53 months for the 154 patients with a common form of MCL, P <0.0001. In the univariate analysis, OS was influenced by age, extranodal site involvement, circulating lymphomatous cells, and international prognosis index (IPI). In the multivariate analysis, only IPI affected OS: patients with IPI > or =2 had 8 months median OS as compared to 36 months median OS for patients with IPI <2, P = 0.003. Blastic variant is one of the worst forms of NHL. An improved recognition of BV of MCL is required, particularly in high-grade CD5+ NHL using immunophenotyping and bcl1 molecular study. Standard therapy using anthracycline or even high-dose intensification produce poor results and an alternative treatment should be proposed to such patients.
    Leukemia 12/2001; 15(11):1785-91. · 10.16 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Relapsed or very aggressive high-grade NHL and refractory low-grade NHL have a poor clinical outcome. Autologous BMT may be used but is of limited efficacy in these cases. Allogeneic BMT offers the advantage of tumour-free bone marrow and a possible GVL effect. Between 1987 and 1996, 13 patients (median age 31 years) suffering from lymphoid malignancies underwent allo-BMT. Four patients had low-grade NHL, three intermediate-grade and six high-grade NHL. Three patients were grafted with evolutive disease, four were in partial remission after several courses of chemotherapy, two were in CR2 and four were in CR1 after initial therapy. The mean number of prior treatments was 2.7 (1-6). Median time from diagnosis to BMT was 25 months (4-90). The conditioning regimen consisted of cyclophosphamide (120 mg/kg/day for all, plus VP16 in one case) and total body irradiation. Five out of the seven patients who were not in CR at the time of transplantation entered CR after BMT. Eight patients developed acute GVHD grade > or = II and four had chronic GVHD. Nine patients are alive, eight in CR with a median follow-up of 49.8 months post BMT (2-125). Overall survival is 67.3% and the median time for EFS is 102 months. Two patients with low-grade NHL relapsed 61 and 102 months post BMT and were treated with DLI. One patient with a stage IV SLL had a partial remission and one with multiple cutaneous localisation of FL entered CR after grade IV acute GVHD. Allo-BMT is a highly effective treatment for advanced poor prognosis lymphoid malignancies with acceptable toxicity. Moreover, DLI can be effective in relapsing patients.
    Bone Marrow Transplantation 03/1999; 23(4):329-33. · 3.54 Impact Factor