A Gupta

Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States

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Publications (9)47.62 Total impact

  • Source
    Journal of Neurology 12/2008; 255(11):1829-31. · 3.58 Impact Factor
  • Neuropediatrics 01/2008; 39(01). · 1.19 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To understand the role of epilepsy surgery in children with generalized or bilateral findings on preoperative scalp EEG. From our pediatric epilepsy surgery series, we identified 50 patients in whom 30 to 100% of preoperative epileptiform discharges (ictal, interictal, or both) were generalized or contralateral to the side of surgery. All patients had severe refractory epilepsy and an epileptogenic lesion on brain MRI. Ninety percent of the lesions were congenital, perinatal, or acquired during infancy, predominantly malformations of cortical development (44%) or cystic encephalomalacia (40%). Age at surgery was 0.2 to 24 (median 7.7) years. Surgeries were hemispherectomy (64%) or lobar or multilobar resection. At last follow-up (median 24.0 months), 72% of patients were seizure-free, 16% had marked improvement with only brief episodes of staring or tonic stiffening, and 12% were not improved. The rate of seizure-free outcome was not significantly associated with age at seizure onset or surgery, presence of hemiparesis or focal clinical features during seizures, type of lesion, or surgery type. Postoperative seizure-free rate did not differ from that in a comparison group of similar patients who matched the study group except for their high percentage (70 to 100%) of ipsilateral ictal and interictal epileptiform discharges on preoperative EEG. Epilepsy surgery may be successful for selected children and adolescents with a congenital or early-acquired brain lesion, despite abundant generalized or bilateral epileptiform discharges on EEG. The diffuse EEG expression may be due to an interaction between the early lesion and the developing brain.
    Neurology 08/2007; 69(4):389-97. · 8.25 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The recent proposal by the ILAE Task Force for Epilepsy Classification is a multiaxial, syndrome-oriented approach. Epilepsy syndromes--at least as defined by the ILAE Task Force--group patients according to multiple, usually poorly defined parameters. As a result, these syndromes frequently show significant overlap and may change with patient age. We propose a five-dimensional and patient-oriented approach to epilepsy classification. This approach shifts away from syndrome orientation, using independent criteria in each of the five dimensions similarly to the diagnostic process in general neurology. The main dimensions of this new classification consist of (1) localizing the epileptogenic zone, (2) semiology of the seizure, (3) etiology, (4) seizure frequency, and (5) related medical conditions. These dimensions characterize all information necessary for patient management, are independent parameters, and include information more pertinent than the ILAE axes with regard to patient management. All cases can be classified according to this five-dimensional system, even at initial encounter when no detailed test results are available. Information from clinical tests such as MRI and EEG are translated into the best possible working hypothesis at the time of classification, allowing increased precision of the classification as additional information becomes available.
    Der Nervenarzt 09/2006; 77(8):961-9. · 0.80 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Der krzlich erschienene Vorschlag der ILAE-Taskforce zur Epilepsieklassifikation ist ein multiaxialer, syndromorientierter Ansatz. Hierbei werden die Patienten unterschiedlichen und oftmals unzureichend definierten Kriterien zugeordnet. Die resultierenden Syndrome haben hufig keine tiologische oder pathophysiologische Relevanz, berlappen und wechseln je nach Alter des Patienten. Wir schlagen einen 5-dimensionalen, patientenorientierten Ansatz zur Klassifikation der Epilepsien vor. Dieser Ansatz wendet sich von der Orientierung an Syndromen ab und basiert stattdessen auf dem methodologischen Ansatz der allgemeinen Neurologie, in dem einerseits das klinische Bild des einzelnen Patienten im Mittelpunkt steht und andererseits in jeder Dimension voneinander unabhngige und mglichst operationalisierbare Kriterien angewandt und schlielich zusammengefhrt werden. Die Dimension dieser Klassifikation sind: (1) Lokalisation der epileptogenen Zone, (2) Semiologie der epileptischen Anflle, (3) tiologie, (4) Anfallshufigkeit und (5) sonstige relevante medizinische Faktoren. Diese Dimensionen enthalten alle fr das Management eines Patienten notwendige Information und sind voneinander unabhngige Parameter. Alle Patienten knnen selbst beim initialen Patientenkontakt sinnvoll in das System eingeordnet werden, auch wenn noch keine apparativen Untersuchungen durchgefhrt wurden. Die Information aller Untersuchungen (z. B. MRT, EEG) fliet zum jeweiligen Zeitpunkt der Klassifikation in die Zuordnung des Patienten ein und erlaubt mit jeder neu verfgbaren Information eine Zunahme der Przision und Validitt der Klassifikation.The recent proposal by the ILAE Task Force for Epilepsy Classification is a multiaxial, syndrome-oriented approach. Epilepsy syndromes – at least as defined by the ILAE Task Force – group patients according to multiple, usually poorly defined parameters. As a result, these syndromes frequently show significant overlap and may change with patient age. We propose a five-dimensional and patient-oriented approach to epilepsy classification. This approach shifts away from syndrome orientation, using independent criteria in each of the five dimensions similarly to the diagnostic process in general neurology. The main dimensions of this new classification consist of (1) localizing the epileptogenic zone, (2) semiology of the seizure, (3) etiology, (4) seizure frequency, and (5) related medical conditions. These dimensions characterize all information necessary for patient management, are independent parameters, and include information more pertinent than the ILAE axes with regard to patient management. All cases can be classified according to this five-dimensional system, even at initial encounter when no detailed test results are available. Information from clinical tests such as MRI and EEG are translated into the best possible working hypothesis at the time of classification, allowing increased precision of the classification as additional information becomes available.
    Der Nervenarzt 07/2006; 77(8):961-969. · 0.80 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To assess short- and long-term seizure freedom, the authors reviewed 371 patients who underwent anterior temporal lobectomy to treat pharmacoresistant epilepsy. The mean follow-up duration was 5.5 years (range 1 to 14.1 years). Fifty-three percent of patients were seizure free at 10 years. The authors identified multiple predictors of recurrence. Results of EEG performed 6 months postoperatively correlated with occurrence and severity of seizure recurrence, in addition to breakthrough seizures with discontinuation of antiepileptic drugs.
    Neurology 07/2006; 66(12):1938-40. · 8.25 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To estimate frequency and risk factors for acute postoperative seizures (APOS) within the first week after extratemporal cortical resection (ETR) and hemispherectomy (HS) in children and to assess the predictive value of APOS on long-term seizure outcome in this group. The authors conducted a retrospective analysis of children (< 18 years), who underwent ETR or HS for intractable epilepsy between 1995 and 2002. APOS features and seizure outcome after ETR or HS were obtained at 6, 12, and 24 months. Univariate logistic regression was used for risk factors of APOS and life table analysis and log rank tests for seizure outcome at 0 to 6, 6 to 12, and 12 to 24 months. Of 132 patients, 34 (26%) had APOS. APOS were more frequent after ETR (26/71) than HS (8/61) (p < 0.01). APOS, irrespective of their timing, number, semiology, or other perioperative complications, were an independent predictor of poor postoperative seizure outcome at 2 years (p < 0.001). The estimated odds of postoperative Engel class I outcome in the APOS vs non-APOS categories was 0.27 (73% less likely) for 0- to 6-month, 0.22 (78% less likely) for 6- to 12-month, and 0.13 (87% less likely) for the 12- to 24-month intervals. Acute postoperative seizures (APOS) occur in 26% children, and the risk is higher after extratemporal cortical resection than hemispherectomy. APOS predict a poor postoperative seizure outcome at 6, 12, and 24 months. This study is useful for counseling families after epilepsy surgery. It also suggests that APOS may not be discounted as "benign" in research studies that evaluate seizure outcomes after epilepsy surgery.
    Neurology 04/2006; 66(7):1038-43. · 8.25 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The authors reviewed preoperative MRI and EEG findings in relation to postsurgical outcome in 17 patients with refractory epilepsy due to tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). Resecting concordant MRI (main tuber) and EEG abnormalities offered seizure freedom (8/9, 89%; median follow-up 25 months) comparable to other focal etiologies. Patients with nonconcordant MRI and EEG findings did less well (3/8, 38%, seizure free; p = 0.027, OR = 13).
    Neurology 06/2005; 64(9):1651-4. · 8.25 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Prolonged high-dose suppressive therapy (HDST) is a mainstay in the management of refractory status epilepticus (RSE), albeit with high morbidity and mortality. The authors studied 10 patients who were carefully selected for epilepsy surgery after failing prolonged (>2 weeks) HDST. Status epilepticus was stopped acutely in all of them with no mortality and no substantial morbidity. At follow-up (median 7 months), 7 (70%) of 10 patients were seizure free, and 3 (30%) of 10 had significant improvement in their epilepsy.
    Neurology 02/2005; 64(3):567-70. · 8.25 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

205 Citations
47.62 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2008
    • Harvard Medical School
      Boston, Massachusetts, United States
    • Barrow Neurological Institute
      Phoenix, Arizona, United States
  • 2006
    • University of Münster
      • Department of Neurology
      Münster, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany
    • Cleveland Clinic
      • Neurological Institute
      Cleveland, OH, United States