A.D. Ruthven

The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Scotland, United Kingdom

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Publications (5)4.34 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: This paper details the first reported integration of two advanced digital microfluidic technologies where 100 mum silicon cubes are transported with electrowetting on dielectric (EWOD) and the droplet then held with EWOD while the silicon cubes are mixed with another liquid using a surface acoustic wave (SAW). Together these two technologies provide a comprehensive lab-on-a-chip combination with well developed functionalities. These include droplet generation, splitting and transportation offered by EWOD with transportation, mixing and biosensing being potentially available with SAW. The fabrication of both EWOD and SAW structures on LiNbO<sub>3</sub> substrates used low temperature Ta/Ta<sub>2</sub>O<sub>5</sub>/CYTOP layer deposition and patterning technologies, which enabled efficient transportation and mixing functions to be demonstrated.
    Solid State Device Research Conference, 2009. ESSDERC '09. Proceedings of the European; 10/2009
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    ABSTRACT: A silicon swimming robot or pond skating device has been demonstrated. It floats on liquid surfaces using surface tension and is capable of movement using electrowetting on dielectric (EWOD) based propulsion. Its dimensions are 6 × 9 mm and the driving mechanism involves first trapping air bubbles within the liquid onto the hydrophobic surface of the device. The air bubbles are then moved using EWOD, which provides the propulsion. The device employs a recently reported EWOD technology enabling a driving voltage of ≈15 V, which is low enough for RF power transmission, thus facilitating wire-free movement. A wired version has been measured to move 1.35 mm in 168 ms (a speed of 8 mm s−1). This low voltage-EWOD (<15 V) device, fabricated using a CMOS compatible process, is believed to be the world’s smallest swimming MEMS device that has no mechanical moving parts. The paper also reports results of EWOD droplet operation driven by wireless power transmission and demonstrates that such a wireless design can be successfully mounted on a floating EWOD device to produce movement.
    Solid-State Electronics 04/2009; DOI:10.1016/j.sse.2009.02.020 · 1.51 Impact Factor
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    Solid-State Electronics 01/2009; 53:798-802. · 1.51 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A silicon swimming robot or pond skating device has been demonstrated. it floats on liquid surfaces using surface tension and is capable of movement using electrowetting on dielectric (EWOD) based propulsion. Its dimensions are 6x9mm with a thickness of 380 mu m. The driving mechanism involves the trapping of air bubbles within the liquid onto the hydrophobic surface of the device with the subsequent ejection using a recently reported Ta(2)O(5) EWOD technology. The required driving voltage of similar to 15V is low enough for RF power transmission, thus providing wire-free movement. A wired version has been measured to move 1.35mm in 168ms (a speed of 8 mm s(-1)). This low-voltage EWOD device, fabricated using a CMOS compatible process, is believed to be the world's smallest swimming MEMS device that has no mechanical moving parts. The paper also reports results of EWOD droplet operation driven by wireless power transmission and demonstrates that such a wireless design can be successfully mounted on a floating EWOD device.
    38th European Solid-State Device Research Conference, 2008. ESSDERC 2008.; 01/2008
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    ABSTRACT: Submillimeter common user bolometer array (SCUBA)-2 is a wide field sub-mm bolometer camera designed to replace the existing SCUBA instrument on the JCMT in Hawaii. It will be many hundreds of times faster in large area mapping than SCUBA and will also go deeper in a single frame. It will enable the many discoveries of SCUBA to be followed up with deep systematic surveys and help act as a pathfinder for the ALMA interferometer. The key technologies for making the arrays have been demonstrated and will be put together to fabricate the first prototype later this year (2003). The wide field nature of the SCUBA-2 bolometer camera, combined with the diffraction limit at sub-mm wavelengths, leads to physically large focal planes where the issues of stray light control, magnetic shielding, and electrical, thermal and mechanical connection must be carefully addressed in order to realise a successful instrument. We describe the solutions we have adopted for these problem areas.
    Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section A Accelerators Spectrometers Detectors and Associated Equipment 03/2004; DOI:10.1016/j.nima.2003.11.355 · 1.32 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

29 Citations
4.34 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2009
    • The University of Edinburgh
      • Institute for Integrated Micro and Nano Systems (IMNS)
      Edinburgh, Scotland, United Kingdom
  • 2008
    • The University of Tokyo
      • Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering
      Edo, Tōkyō, Japan