Qian-Zhen Li

Fujian Medical University, Min-hou, Fujian, China

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Publications (8)13.76 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Background In total arch repair with open placement of a triple-branched stent graft for acute type A aortic dissection, the diameters of the native arch vessels and the distances between 2 neighboring arch vessels did not always match the available sizes of the triple-branched stent grafts, and insertion of the triple-branched stent graft through the distal ascending aortic incision was not easy in some cases. To reduce those two problems, we modified the triple-branched stent graft and developed the arch open technique.Methods and resultsTotal arch repair with open placement of a modified triple-branched stent graft and the arch open technique was performed in 25 consecutive patients with acute type A aortic dissection. There was 1 surgical death. Most survivors had an uneventful postoperative course. All implanted stents were in a good position and wide expansion, there was no space or blood flow surrounding the stent graft. Complete thrombus obliteration of the false lumen was found around the modified triple-branched stent graft in all survivors and at the diaphragmatic level in 20 of 24 patients.Conclusions The modified triple-branched stent graft could provide a good match with the different diameters of the native arch vessels and the various distances between 2 neighboring arch vessels, and it¿s placement could become much easier by the arch open technique. Consequently, placement of a modified triple-branched stent graft could be easily used in most patients with acute type A aortic dissection for effective total arch repair.
    Journal of Cardiothoracic Surgery 08/2014; 9(1):135. · 0.90 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: This was a study to evaluate the safety and feasibility of balloon valvuloplasty of the pulmonary valve through the right ventricle (RV) for the treatment of pulmonary atresia with intact ventricular septum (PA-IVS). METHODS: Ten neonates with PA-IVS, who underwent balloon valvuloplasty of the pulmonary valve through the RV at our institution from January 2008 to May 2010, were enrolled in this study. The oxygen saturation range was 60% to 83% (median 76%). The Z-value range of the tricuspid valve annulus was -2 to 2 (median 0.15), the diameter range of the pulmonary valve annulus was 4.6 to 8.6 mm (median 7.3), and the RV systolic pressure range was 88 to 124 mm Hg (median 106.5). A guidewire was used to perforate the pulmonary valve through the RV, followed by balloon dilation of the valve. The procedure was guided by transesophageal echocardiography. RESULTS: The procedure was carried out successfully in all patients. The procedure time ranged from 64 to 110 minutes (median 82.5). Mechanical ventilation time ranged from 8 to 36 hours (median 11), and hospital stay ranged from 7 to 13 days (median 9). After the procedure, the median oxygen saturation increased to 89.5%, the median RV systolic pressure decreased to 45 mm Hg, and the gradient across the pulmonary valve ranged from 20 to 45 mm Hg (median 27.5). Minor complications included transient supraventricular tachycardia (n = 1), blood loss requiring transfusion (n = 2), moderate pulmonary regurgitation (n = 1), and mild pulmonary regurgitation (n = 3). There were no cases of cardiac perforation, main pulmonary artery aneurysm, or low output syndrome. Follow-up of patients ranged from 8 to 15 months (median 12.3). All patients remained clinically well. CONCLUSIONS: Balloon valvuloplasty of the pulmonary valve through the RV is a safe and feasible alternative to surgical valvotomy or percutaneous balloon dilation. Early results are encouraging.
    The Annals of thoracic surgery 03/2013; · 3.45 Impact Factor
  • Qian-Zhen Li, Xi-Jie Wu
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the effects of non-invasive ventilation in the treatment of infants with respiratory failure after cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) and extubation. Sixty-three infants who had undergone successful surgery with CPB, got respiratory failure after extubation. These infants were randomly divided into two groups: non-invasive (NV) group, treated with non-invasive ventilation and invasive (IV) group, treated with tracheal intubation. The alteration of clinical symptoms, heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR), pulse oxygen saturation (SpO2) and blood gas were measured. A comparison was conducted in the incidence of complication and hospital infection, mechanical ventilation time, length of stay in ICU and hospital stay. Among the 32 patients in NV group, 1 patient died of heart failure, the remaining 31 patients recovered. Of these 32, 26 patients had relief of respiratory failure, the HR 181 (19.7) bpm, RR 54 (16.7) bpm and PaCO2 55.5(6) mm Hg decreased to 157 (12) bpm, 35 (3.25) bpm, and 42 (10.5) mm Hg, meanwhile SpO2 87% (10.5%), pH 7.29 (0.24), PaO2 55.5(6) mm Hg increased to 96% (3%), 7.37(0.15), 82.5 (11) mm Hg after treatment with non-invasive ventilation (P < 0.01). Six patients underwent tracheal intubation because their condition was not improved. Tracheal hemorrhage or laryngeal edema did not occur in these patients. Among the 31 patients in IV group, 1 patient died of heart failure, the other patients were cured. Of these 30, one patient had tracheal hemorrhage and four patients had laryngeal edema. The incidence of hospital infection in NV group was lower compared with that in IV group. The mechanical ventilation time in NV group 42 (17.2) h was shorter compared with that in IV group 50 (20) h (P < 0.01). There was no significant difference in the length of ICU and hospital stay between the two groups. Non-invasive ventilation is a safe and effective method to treat infants with respiratory failure after CPB and extubation.
    Zhonghua er ke za zhi. Chinese journal of pediatrics 02/2013; 51(2):118-21.
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    ABSTRACT: We describe a modified valve-sparing aortic root replacement technique for acute type A aortic dissection. After the normal root geometry was restored by removing blood and clots in the proximal false lumen and the valve insufficiency was corrected by simple resuspension of the aortic commissures, three teardrop-shaped patches were sutured inside the sinuses as neointima and then in situ coronary buttons were connected to the small holes created in the corresponding patches. Our initial application showed that this modified valve-sparing aortic root replacement technique is an easy and effective way to restore the geometry of the aortic root and avoid bleeding during surgery for acute type A dissection.
    European journal of cardio-thoracic surgery: official journal of the European Association for Cardio-thoracic Surgery 06/2012; 42(4):731-3. · 2.40 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives This study aims at assessing the safety and feasibility of intraoperative device closure of the perimembranous ventricular septal defect (VSD).Methods Total 89 patients in group I with intraoperative device closure and 58 in group II with surgical repair were enrolled in our hospital to participate in the study from January 2009 to December 2010. In group I, the approach involved a minimal inferior median incision that was performed after full evaluation of the perimembranous VSD by real-time transesophageal echocardiographic guidance, and the insertion of an asymmetric or a symmetric domestically made device was used to occlude the perimembranous VSD.Results In group I, 83 patients were occluded successfully under this approach. The size of the occluder implanted ranged from 6 to 14 mm. Complete atrioventricular block occurred in one case and Mobitz type II atrioventricular block occurred in one case during the procedure. One patient presented complete atrioventricular block one week after the operation. Two patients converted to surgical repair because of severe intraoperative aortic valve regurgitation. One patient with significant residual shunt transformed to surgical treatment. In our comparative studies, patients in group II experienced significantly longer operative time, ICU stay, and hospital stay (p < 0.001). The cost of group I was less than that of group II (p < 0.001).Conclusions Minimally invasive transthoracic device closure of the perimembranous VSD with an asymmetric or a symmetric domestically made device without cardiopulmonary bypass is safe and feasible. It should be considered an acceptable alternative to surgery in selected subgroups. However, it is necessary to evaluate the long-term results.
    The Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgeon 06/2012; · 0.93 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Atrioventricular block (AVB) is a well-reported complication after closure of perimembranous ventricular septal defects (VSDs). To report the occurrence of AVB either during or following closure of perimembranous VSDs using a novel "hybrid" method involving a minimal inferior median incision and of intraoperative device closure of the perimembranous VSDs. Between January 2009 and January 2011, patients diagnosed with perimembranous VSDs eligible for intraoperative device closure with a domestic occluder were identified. All patients were assessed by real-time transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) and electrocardiography. Of the 97 included patients, 94 were successfully occluded using this approach. Complete AVB occurred in only one case and one case of Mobitz type II AVB was diagnosed intraoperatively. In both patients, the procedure was aborted and the AVBs quickly resolved. Glucocorticosteroids were administered to another two patients who developed Mobitz type II AVB intraoperatively. Those two patients converted to Mobitz type I AVB 3 days and 5 days postsurgically. During the follow-up period (range, 6-24 months), one patient developed complete AVB 1 week following device insertion. Surgical device removal was followed by a rapid and complete recovery of atrioventricular conduction. Intraoperative device closure of perimembranous VSDs with a domestic occluder resulted in excellent closure rates; however, AVB is a serious complication that can occur either during or any time after device closure of perimembranous VSDs. The technique described herein may reduce the incidence of perioperative AVB complications. Surgeons are encouraged to closely monitor all patients postsurgically to ensure AVB does not occur in their patients. Additional long-term data to better identify the prevalence and risk factors for AVB in treated patients are needed.
    BMC Cardiovascular Disorders 03/2012; 12:21. · 1.46 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Atrioventricular block (AVB) is a infrequent and serious complication after percutaneous ASD closure. In this study, we report on the incidence of AVB associated with intraoperative device closure of the ASD with transthoracic minimal invasion, and the outcomes of this complication in our center. Between May 2006 and January 2011, a total of 213 secundum-type ASD patients were accepted in our hospital for intraoperative and transthoracic device closure with a domestic occluder. All patients were assessed by real-time transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) and electrocardiograph (ECG). All patients were occluded successfully under this approach. Immediate postprocedure third-degree AVB was observed in two patients. Since heart rates were in the range of about 50 to 55 beats per minute, no intervention was needed except for close observation for one patient. Another patient who recovered sinus rhythm intermittently during the operation was fitted with a temporary pacemaker. Approximately one week following glucocorticoid treatment, the AVB resolved spontaneously in these two patients. Mobitz type II AVB occurred in three patients during the procedure. Two patients developed post-operative cardiac arrest and were rescued successfully with cardiopulmonary resuscitation. One other patient changed to Mobitz type I AVB after three days. During the follow-up period, which ranged from six months to five years, no further occurrence of AVB was found. Intraoperative and transthoracic device closure of secundum ASDs with domestic occluder resulted in excellent closure rate. AVB is an infrequent but serious complication during and after device closure of a secundum ASD. AVB is a complication that warrants greater attention and long-term follow-up.
    PLoS ONE 01/2012; 7(12):e52726. · 3.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study aimed to assess the safety and feasibility of intraoperative device closure of perimembranous ventricular septal defects (VSD) in young children guided by transthoracic echocardiography (TTE). We enrolled 18 patients from our hospital to participate in the study from June 2011 to September 2011. A minimal inferior median incision was performed after full evaluation of the perimembranous VSD by real-time TTE, and a domestically made device was inserted to occlude the perimembranous VSD. The proper size of the device was determined by means of transthoracic echocardiographic analysis. Implantation was ultimately successful in 16 patients using TTE guidance. In these cases, the complete closure rate immediately following the operation and on subsequent follow-up was 100%. Symmetric devices were used in 14 patients, and asymmetric devices were used in two patients. Two patient were transformed to surgical treatment, one for significant residual shunting, and the other for unsuccessful wire penetration of the VSD. The follow-up periods were less than nine months, and only one patient had mild aortic regurgitation. There were no instances of residual shunt, noticeable aortic regurgitation, significant arrhythmia, thrombosis, or device failure. Minimally invasive transthoracic device closure of perimembranous VSDs is safe and feasible, using a domestically made device under transthoracic echocardiographic guidance, without the need for cardiopulmonary bypass. This technique should be considered an acceptable alternative to surgery or device closure guided by transesophageal echocardiography in selected young children. However, a long-term evaluation of outcomes is necessary.
    Journal of Cardiothoracic Surgery 12/2011; 6:166. · 0.90 Impact Factor