Erin P Ferranti

Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, United States

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Publications (7)6.44 Total impact

  • The Journal of cardiovascular nursing. 11/2014; 29(6):479-481.
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to examine the association of intrapersonal influences of diet quality as defined by the Health Belief Model constructs in women with recent histories of gestational diabetes.
    The Diabetes Educator 06/2014; · 1.94 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Studies show 30% to 47% of people with heart failure (HF) have concomitant diabetes mellitus (DM). Self-care for persons with both of these chronic conditions is conflicting, complex, and often inadequate. This pilot study tested an integrated self-care program for its effects on HF and DM knowledge, self-care efficacy, self-care behaviors, and quality of life (QOL). Hospitalized HF-DM participants (N = 71) were randomized to usual care or intervention using a 1:2 allocation and followed at 30 and 90 days after intervention. Intervention was an integrated education and counseling program focused on HF-DM self-care. Variables included demographic and clinical data, knowledge about HF and DM, HF- and DM-specific self-efficacy, standard HF and DM QOL scales, and HF and DM self-care behaviors. Analysis included descriptive statistics, multilevel longitudinal models for group and time effects, post hoc testing, and effect size calculations. Sidak adjustments were used to control for type 1 error inflation. The integrated HF-DM self-care intervention conferred effects on improved HF knowledge (30 days, p = .05), HF self-care maintenance (30 and 90 days, p < .001), HF self-care management (90 days, p = .05), DM self-efficacy (30 days, p = .03; 90 days, p = .004), general diet (30 days, p = .05), HF physical QOL (p = .04), and emotional QOL scores (p = .05) at 90 days within the intervention group. The participants in the usual care group also reported increased total and physical QOL. Greater percentages of participants in the intervention group improved self reported exercise between 0 and 30 days (p = .005 and moderate effect size ES = .47) and foot care between 0 and 90 days (p = .03, small ES = .36). No group differences or improvements in DM-specific QOL were observed. An integrated HF-DM self-care intervention was effective in improving essential components of self-care and had sustained (90 day) effects on selected self-care behaviors. Future studies testing HF-DM integrated self-care interventions in larger samples with longer follow-up and on other outcomes such as hospitalization and clinical markers are warranted.
    Nursing outlook 10/2013; · 1.54 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The associations between specific intra- and inter-personal psychosocial factors and dietary patterns were explored in a healthy, working adult sample of university and health center employees (N = 640) who were enrolled in a prospective predictive health study. Participants had a mean age of 48 (SD = 11) years and were 67% women and 30% minority. Baseline psychosocial measures of perceived stress, depressive symptoms, social support, and family functioning were examined for their relationships with three diet quality indices-AHEI, DASH, and the Mediterranean. Dietary intake was of moderate quality in this high-income, well-educated, psychosocially healthy population. Social support was positively associated with better diet quality for all three indices (p < .01). Further research should focus on socio-environmental factors associated with diet quality. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Res Nurs Health.
    Research in Nursing & Health 02/2013; · 2.18 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Women with previous gestational diabetes (pGDM) are at risk for cardio-metabolic disease. However, there is no consensus regarding risk-counseling or dietary management for pGDM women. This study assessed perceived and actual cardio-metabolic risk of Atlanta-area pGDM women within three years of diagnosis. Methods: Women with pGDM (n=16) were assessed for perceived risk of diabetes (Risk Perception Survey for Developing Diabetes, including Personal Control, Worry, and Optimistic Bias subscales), knowledge of dietary guidelines (adapted 2010 US Dietary Guidelines knowledge questionnaire) and cardio-metabolic risk (hemoglobin A1C, blood pressure, lipids and anthropometric factors). Data were analyzed with descriptive and correlational statistics. Results: Participants mean age was 37.5 (5.3) years and BMI was 27.6 (6.0). They were 40% Black, 40% White, 27% Hispanic and 1.8 (1.1) years since diagnosis. Most (75%) reported receiving no post-partum lifestyle counseling and 58% believed they had no or slight chance in developing type 2 diabetes mellitus within the next ten years. Knowledge of diabetes risk factors (test score=57.8% (19.2) and dietary guidelines (mean test score=33.6% (18.6)) was low. Most women did not have metabolic syndrome (80%); however, 58% were overweight or obese and 50% were prediabetic. Greater worry of diabetes risk was associated with higher hemoglobin A1C levels (r=0.75, p=.005). Conclusions: This preliminary study reveals that women with pGDM in metropolitan Atlanta do not perceive themselves at risk for cardio-metabolic disease, despite multiple risk factors. Addressing risk reduction and health promotion strategies among this high-risk group of women is indicated.
    140st APHA Annual Meeting and Exposition 2012; 10/2012
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    ABSTRACT: Migrant farmworkers represent one of the most marginalized and underserved populations in the United States. Acculturation theory cannot be easily mapped onto the transnational experience of migrant farmworkers, who navigate multiple physical and cultural spaces yearly, and who are not recognized by the state they constitute, "the Citizen's Other" (Kerber, 2009). This paper utilizes narrative analysis of a case study to illustrate, through the relationship of the narrator to migrant farmworkers and years of participant observation by the coauthors, how isolation from family and community, as well as invisibility within institutions, affect the health and well-being of migrant farmworkers in southeastern Georgia. Invisibility of farmworkers within institutions, such as health care, the educational system, social services, domestic violence shelters, and churches contribute to illness among farmworkers. The dominant American discourse surrounding immigration policy addresses the strain immigrants put on the social systems, educational system, and the health care system. Nurses who work with farmworkers are well positioned to bring the subjective experience of farmworkers to light, especially for those engaged with socially just policies. Those who contribute to the abundant agricultural produce that feeds Americans deserve the recognition upon which social integration depends.
    Nursing research and practice. 01/2012; 2012:760418.
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    ABSTRACT: This is a report of an educational strategy to prepare nursing students to respond to disasters. The strategy includes an emergency preparedness disaster simulation (EPDS) implemented in a school of nursing simulation lab using patient simulators, task trainer mannequins, and live actors. The EPDS immerses student groups into a "tornado ravaged assisted-living facility" where the principles of emergency preparedness can be employed. A total of 90 B.S.N. students participated in the EPDS in the final semester of their senior year. Student post-simulation survey responses were overwhelmingly positive, with mean scores of 4.65 (on a 5-point Likert scale) reported for the EPDS "increasing understanding of emergency preparedness" and "well organized." Mean scores were over 4.40 for "scenario believability, increasing knowledge base, increasing confidence in working in teams, ability to handle emergency preparedness situations and to work more effectively in hospital or clinic." The lowest mean score of 4.04 was for "prompting realistic expectations." Owing to the effectiveness of this educational strategy, the EPDS has been incorporated into the undergraduate curriculum.
    Public Health Nursing 01/2012; 29(1):44-51. · 0.78 Impact Factor