Virginia K Saba

Georgetown University, Washington, Washington, D.C., United States

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Publications (14)9.02 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: While nursing activities represent a significant proportion of inpatient care, there are no reliable methods for determining nursing costs based on the actual services provided by the nursing staff. Capture of data to support accurate measurement and reporting on the cost of nursing services is fundamental to effective resource utilization. Adopting standard terminologies that support tracking both the quality and the cost of care could reduce the data entry burden on direct care providers. This pilot study evaluated the feasibility of using a standardized nursing terminology, the Clinical Care Classification System (CCC), for developing a reliable costing method for nursing services. Two different approaches are explored; the Relative Value Unit RVU and the simple cost-to-time methods. We found that the simple cost-to-time method was more accurate and more transparent in its derivation than the RVU method and may support a more consistent and reliable approach for costing nursing services.
    AMIA ... Annual Symposium proceedings / AMIA Symposium. AMIA Symposium 01/2013; 2013:364-71.
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    ABSTRACT: As health care systems and providers move towards meaningful use of electronic health records, the once distant vision of collaborative patient-centric, interdisciplinary plans of care, generated and updated across organizations and levels of care, may soon become a reality. Effective care planning is included in the proposed Stages 2-3 Meaningful Use quality measures. To facilitate interoperability, standardization of plan of care messaging, content, information and terminology models are needed. This degree of standardization requires local and national coordination. The purpose of this paper is to review some existing standards that may be leveraged to support development of interdisciplinary patient-centric plans of care. Standards are then applied to a use case to demonstrate one method for achieving patient-centric and interoperable interdisciplinary plan of care documentation. Our pilot work suggests that existing standards provide a foundation for adoption and implementation of patient-centric plans of care that are consistent with federal requirements.
    AMIA ... Annual Symposium proceedings / AMIA Symposium. AMIA Symposium 01/2011; 2011:356-63.
  • Judy G Ozbolt · Virginia K Saba
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    ABSTRACT: From the beginning of modern nursing, data from standardized patient records were seen as a potentially powerful resource for assessing and improving the quality of care. As nursing informatics began to evolve in the second half of the 20th century, the lack of standards for language and data limited the functionality and usefulness of early applications. In response, nurses developed standardized languages, but until the turn of the century, neither they nor anyone else understood the attributes required to achieve computability and semantic interoperability. Collaboration across disciplines and national boundaries has led to the development of standards that meet these requirements, opening the way for powerful information tools. Many challenges remain, however. Realizing the potential of nurses to transform and improve health care and outcomes through informatics will require fundamental changes in individuals, organizations, and systems. Nurses are developing and applying informatics methods and tools to discover knowledge and improve health from the molecular to the global level and are seeking the collective wisdom of interdisciplinary and interorganizational collaboration to effect the necessary changes. NOTE: Although this article focuses on nursing informatics in the United States, nurses around the world have made substantial contributions to the field. This article alludes to a few of those advances, but a comprehensive description is beyond the scope of the present work.
    Nursing outlook 09/2008; 56(5):199-205.e2. DOI:10.1016/j.outlook.2008.06.008
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to translate and integrate nursing diagnosis concepts from the Clinical Care Classification (CCC) System Version 2.0 to DiagnosticPhenomenon or nursing diagnostic statements in the International Classification for Nursing Practice (ICNP) Version 1.0. Source concepts for CCC were mapped by the project team, where possible, to pre-coordinated ICNP terms. The manual decomposition of source concepts according to the ICNP 7-Axis Model served to validate the mappings. A total of 62% of the CCC Nursing Diagnoses were a pre-coordinated match to an ICNP concept, 35% were a post-coordinated match and only 3% had no match. During the mapping process, missing CCC concepts were submitted to the ICNP Programme, with a recommendation for inclusion in future releases.
    Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association 09/2008; 15(6):791-3. DOI:10.1197/jamia.M2801
  • Veronica D Feeg · Virginia K Saba · Alan N Feeg
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    ABSTRACT: This study tested a personal computer-based version of the Sabacare Clinical Care Classification System on students' performance of charting patient care plans. The application was designed as an inexpensive alternative to teach electronic charting for use on any laptop or personal computer with Windows and Microsoft Access. The data-based system was tested in a randomized trial with the control group using a type-in text-based-only system also mounted on a laptop at the bedside in the laboratory. Student care plans were more complete using the data-based system over the type-in text version. Students were more positive but not necessarily more efficient with the data-based system. The results demonstrate that the application is effective for improving student nursing care charting using the nursing process and capturing patient care information with a language that is standardized and ready for integration with other patient electronic health record data. It can be implemented on a bedside stand in the clinical laboratory or used to aggregate care planning over a student's clinical experience.
    Computers, informatics, nursing: CIN 01/2008; 26(6):339-49. DOI:10.1097/01.NCN.0000336465.17811.3c
  • Virginia K Saba · Sheryl L Taylor
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    ABSTRACT: This article provides an overview of the Clinical Care Classification System Version 2.0, a standardized coded nursing terminology designed to enhance nursing visibility. The article provides a background as to why a coded language is needed to describe the "essence of care" to validate patient outcomes. The article highlights the research that produced Clinical Care Classification System and describes how the two interrelated terminologies-the Clinical Care Classification System of Nursing Diagnoses and Outcomes and the Clinical Care Classification System of Nursing Interventions/Actions-are linked and mapped to each other using its coding structure. Examples of the two terminologies are presented with detailed explanations about the coding process. The article highlights the attributes of the Clinical Care Classification System and its place in electronic health record systems.
    CIN Computers Informatics Nursing 01/2007; 25(6):324-31; quiz 32-3. DOI:10.1097/01.NCN.0000299654.13777.9f
  • Virginia K Saba · Veronica Feeg · Debra Konicek
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    ABSTRACT: This is a demonstration of the Clinical Care Classification (CCC) System Charting Model. The Model software is designed for any personal computer (PC) with Windows using Microsoft Office and Access. The program has been tested as efficient and effective for charting patient care plans using the CCC System's Standardized language following the nursing process. It is available for integration in any electronic health record (E.H.R) system.
    Studies in health technology and informatics 02/2006; 122:1011.
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    Virginia K Saba · Veronica D Feeg
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    ABSTRACT: This study tested a PC based version of the CCC System on students' performance of charting patient care plans. The application was designed for any PC with Windows and Microsoft Office(r) programs. The PC based system was tested in a randomized trial with the control group using a type-in text-based only system also mounted on the bedside computer. The results demonstrate that the application is efficient and effective for nursing care charting using the nursing process and capturing patient care information with a language that is standardized and ready for integration with other patient electronic health record (E.H.R) data.
    AMIA ... Annual Symposium proceedings / AMIA Symposium. AMIA Symposium 02/2005;
  • Virginia K Saba · Jean M Arnold
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    ABSTRACT: To provide a means for calculating the cost of nursing care using the Clinical Care Classification System (CCCS). Three CCCS indicators of care components, actions, and outcomes in conjunction with Clinical Care Pathways (CCPs). The cost of patient care is based on the type of action time multiplied by care components and nursing costs. The CCCM for the CCCS makes it possible to measure and cost out clinical practice. The CCCM may be used with CCPs in the electronic patient medical record. The CCPs make it easy to track the clinical nursing care across time, settings, population groups, and geographical locations. Collected data may be used many times, allowing for improved documentation, analysis, and costing out of care.
    International Journal of Nursing Terminologies and Classifications 07/2004; 15(3):69-77. DOI:10.1111/j.1744-618X.2004.tb00002.x
  • Virginia K Saba · Jean M Arnold
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    ABSTRACT: The Clinical Care Costing Method (CCCM for the Home Health Care Classification (HHCC) System provides an innovative way to determine the cost of clinical nursing practice. This costing methodology consists of three major nursing indicators--Care Components, Actions and Outcomes. These three indicators require Clinical Care Pathways (CCP) to document, track, and code clinical care using the HHCC System. The clinical care costs and/or resources are derived from the time and frequencies of the Action Types for the specific nursing interventions performed by the different type of health care providers to achieve the Outcomes and resolve the Care Component that are used to classify nursing diagnoses/patient problems. This method can also be used to deter-mine the reimbursement for nursing care services retrospectively and once validated prospectively. The Clinical Pathway data provide the evidence that the nursing interventions achieve the desired outcomes.
    Studies in health technology and informatics 02/2004; 107(Pt 2):1371-3.
  • Virginia K Saba · Diane J Skiba · Carol Bickford
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    ABSTRACT: This paper provides an overview and description of the processes that address the competencies and credentialing of nurses in the field of nursing informatics (NI). It provides the highlights of the informatics competencies that were proposed as the NI field advanced. It also provides an overview of the ANCC nursing informatics credentialing process. It will also present the credentialing process of the HIMSS organization which offers several different certifications. And finally it will address the new process for the international certification entitled Nursing Informatics Competency Recognition Certificate. The Nursing Informatics Special Interest Group of the International Medical Informatics Association (IMIA/NI-SIG) approved this certificate at the general assembly meeting during NI'2003 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The certification is based on a professional portfolio that demonstrates expertise in this field for nurses outside the USA and Canada.
    Studies in health technology and informatics 02/2004; 109:75-89.
  • Virginia K Saba
    Studies in health technology and informatics 02/2002; 65:21-44.
  • Virginia K Saba
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    ABSTRACT: This paper provides an overview of the Home Health Care Classification (HHCC) System focusing on its two interrelated taxonomies: HHCC of Nursing Diagnoses and HHCC of Nursing Interventions both of which are classified by 20 Care Components. It highlights the major events that influenced its development, current status, and future uses. The two HHCC taxonomies and their 20 Care Components are used as a standardized framework to code, index, and classify home health clinical nursing practice. Further, they are used to document, electronically track, evaluate outcomes and analyze home health care over time, across settings, population groups, and geographic locations.
    Online journal of issues in nursing 02/2002; 7(3):9.
  • V K Saba
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    ABSTRACT: Today, at the beginning of the 21st century, nursing informatics has become a part of our professional activities. Informatics has advanced the field of nursing by bridging the gap from nursing as an art to nursing as a science. This article discusses the major milestones that have influenced the growth of computer technology and the specific efforts that have influenced yesterday's creation of the nursing informatics movement. It also provides an overview of nursing informatics in today's health care industry, while highlighting the administrative, management, research and educational applications and initiatives. In addition, it provides an overview of Saba's Home Health Care Classification, a nursing language system that has influenced the field. Finally, it provides a prediction of how computer technology will impact the nursing profession in the 21st century.
    International Nursing Review 10/2001; 48(3):177-87. DOI:10.1046/j.1466-7657.2001.00064.x