Diane Hogan

Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, L, Ireland

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Publications (16)22.51 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The aim was to understand the factors influencing informal disclosure of child sexual abuse experiences, taking account of dynamics operating prior to, during, and following disclosure. In-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted with 22 young people who experienced child sexual abuse and 14 parents. Grounded theory methodology informed the study. The key factors identified as influencing the disclosure process included being believed, being asked, shame/self-blame, concern for self and others, and peer influence. Many young people both wanted to tell and did not want to tell. Fear of not being believed; being asked questions about their well-being; feeling ashamed of what happened and blaming themselves for the abuse, for not telling, and for the consequences of disclosure; concern for how both disclosure and nondisclosure would impact on themselves and others; and being supported by and yet pressurized by peers to tell an adult, all illustrate the complex intrapersonal and interpersonal dynamics reflecting the conflict inherent in the disclosure process. These findings build on previous studies that emphasize the dialogic and interpersonal dynamics in the disclosure process. Both intrapersonal and interpersonal influencing factors need to be taken account of in designing interventions aimed at helping children tell. The importance of asking young people about their psychological well-being and the role of peer relationships are highlighted as key to how we can help young people tell.
    Journal of Interpersonal Violence 11/2013; · 1.64 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In recent years the demography of the family in Ireland has undergone structural transformation and single-parent and step-parent families are now a common feature of our social landscape. Given the increasing diversity in children’s family experiences, it is important to explore how they construct their own ideas about their family lives. In this paper, findings are presented from a cross-sectional study of 99 children and adolescents living in Ireland (age range 9 to 16 years). The study adopted a focus group methodology to examine children’s and young people’s ideas about what constitutes a family, exploring the salience of concepts such as family structure, relationships, marriage, children, co-residence and biological relatedness for children’s developing concept of family. The findings suggest that children are accepting of a variety of diverse family forms and view supportive family relationships as the basis for defining ’ family’. For a small number of children, however, the traditional nuclear family remains a salient image. Children’s perspectives on roles within the family indicated the pivotal role that they themselves play in family life. These findings may have implications for how researchers and policymakers conceptualise contemporary family life and relationships.
    The Irish Journal of Psychology. 11/2012; 27(1):79-87.
  • Ellis Hennessy, Diane Hogan
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    ABSTRACT: The paper presents an overview of publications during the past twenty-five years in the area of child psychology and child and adult development by researchers based in Irish institutions or using an Irish sample. Papers were identified through searches of the PsycLit and ERIC electronic data bases. In the period since 1974 there were over 300 publications with the majority appearing in the last ten years. The paper identifies the changing trends over time in publications in the areas of social functioning, cognition, clinical issues, education, measurement and public policy. The leading area of research is children's social functioning and there is evidence of a growing interest in applied social issues. Almost all empirical research involved samples of school age children with very limited attention to infancy, adulthood and aging. While most authors clearly intended their focus on children to reflect an interest in developmental processes, very few of the studies used traditional developmental designs or nationally representative samples. The authors conclude that a nationally representative longitudinal study will contribute to our understanding of development in the context of rapid social change in Ireland.
    The Irish Journal of Psychology. 11/2012; 21(3):105-121.
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    ABSTRACT: Although previous research has highlighted the importance of the quality of nonresident father-child relationships for children's well-being, little is known about children's perspectives on what underpins feelings of closeness to their nonresident fathers. This qualitative study explored the processes that facilitate or constrain children's feelings of closeness to their nonresident fathers. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 27 children (ages 8 to 17) who had grown up in a single-mother household, where fathers were nonresident from early in the child's life. Findings revealed the fragility of children's ties with their nonresident fathers and the risk that nonresidence from the outset placed upon these relationships. Children's experiences of closeness to fathers were related to perceptions of their fathers' commitment to their relationship and his obligation to his parenting role, and to a sense of connection to and familiarity with their fathers. It was a challenge for children to feel connected to their fathers when contact arrangements were detached from caregiving activities and precluded immersion in each other's daily lives. Lack of effort on the part of fathers to maintain contact or failure to keep arrangements constrained children's feelings of closeness and gave rise to feelings of disappointment and anger. Children demonstrated their capacity to act as agents within their families as they made sense of these relationships for themselves and accepted or rejected their father as a person who could play a meaningful role in their lives. The implications of the findings for promoting positive relationships with nonresident fathers are discussed.
    Journal of Family Psychology 05/2012; 26(3):381-90. · 1.89 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Little research has considered the nature of parent-child relationships in stable singleparent households that have not undergone transitions such as divorce and repartnering. This study explored how single mothers and their children negotiated their relationships in a context where the mother has been parenting alone continuously from early in the child's life. Thirtyeight children and adolescents and their mothers participated in qualitative semistructured interviews. Both mothers and children characterized their relationship as highly intense and exclusive. Perceived limitations in mothers' resources yielded opportunities for shifting dynamics of power and dependence where children adopted an ethic of care in their relationships with their mothers. In response to this, mothers worked to reaffirm clear distinctions between parent and child roles and protect against role boundaries becoming blurred by exercising their authority and managing children's exposure to household responsibilities. These findings provide insight into how mothers and children negotiated interdependence as they moved functionally between vertical and horizontal interactions in their relationship.
    Family Relations 02/2012; 61:142-156. · 0.68 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study reports a grounded theory study of the process of how children tell of their experiences of child sexual abuse from the perspectives of young people and their parents. Individual interviews were conducted with 22 young people aged 8 to 18, and 14 parents. A theoretical model was developed that conceptualises the process of disclosure as one of containing the secret of child sexual abuse. Three key dynamics were identified: the active withholding of the secret on the part of the child, the experience of a 'pressure cooker effect' reflecting a conflict between the wish to tell and the wish to keep the secret, and the confiding itself which often occurs in the context of an intimacy being shared. Children's experiences of disclosure were multidetermined and suggest the need for multifaceted and multisystemic approaches to prevention and intervention. The need for the secret to be contained, individually and interpersonally in appropriate safeguarding and therapeutic contexts needs to be respected in helping children tell.
    Journal of Interpersonal Violence 12/2011; 27(6):1155-75. · 1.64 Impact Factor
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    Diane M. Hogan
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    ABSTRACT: This article explores the processes through which dependence on opiates affects parenting capacity and family processes. The findings are based on in-depth interviews with 100 parents (50 drug-using [opiate dependent] and 50 non-drug using) living in Dublin. Qualitative analyses of semi-structured interviews suggest that opiate dependence has a specific impact on parenting processes and particularly on the physical and emotional availability of parents and on the capacity of parents to provide an emotionally consistent environment. Parenting behaviours were linked, based on parents’ perspectives, to elements of the culture surrounding illicit drugs and their supply and acquisition, to drug treatment regimes and to the physiological and psychological effects of drugs. The implications for children's development and well-being, and for support of affected families, are considered.
    07/2009; 15(6):617-635.
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    ABSTRACT: Increasingly, children experience ongoing change in family formation and structure and such fluctuation may threaten or diminish children’s feelings of security with regard to established family roles, relationships and routines. A number of studies have explored available support for children in the context of family transition, focusing in particular upon those organisations providing services to children and families. However, in order to gain more precise insight into the mechanisms through which children can best be supported, it is necessary to consult children themselves and to elicit their perspectives and responses to the changes in their family contexts. A primary aim of the present study, therefore, is to gain an understanding of children’s strategies for coping with parental separation, and the sources of support that they find most helpful in order to adjust to these changes. Sixty children, in two age groups (8-11 representing middle childhood and 14-17 representing adolescence) participated in the study. A qualitative approach was adopted with semi-structured interviews exploring children’s perspectives on the role played by different types of support, both informal (family, friends) and formal (counselling/peer support services, school). Key findings in the present study highlight the importance for children of being selective about whom they seek and accept support from, with the family being the preferred source of support for the majority of children. The study also highlights the need to provide a broad range of services in outside agencies in a non-stigmatising way and at various stages throughout the separation process.
    Child Care in Practice 01/2008; 14(3):311-325.
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    Diane M. Hogan
    Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry 10/2003; 39(5):609 - 620. · 5.42 Impact Factor
  • Diane M Hogan
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    ABSTRACT: The lifestyle associated with opiate dependence, including drug taking, the buying and selling of drugs, and contact with other drug users, carries potential risks for the safety and well-being of children of drug-using parents. Based on a qualitative interview study conducted with 50 opiate-dependent parents in Dublin, Ireland, the parenting beliefs and practices in relation to children's exposure to drugs and the associated lifestyle are described. Parents saw their lifestyle as potentially risky for their children and their families. The most common strategy adopted by parents was to conceal their drug-related activities and maintain a strict family taboo about these activities. Intervention programmes should be offered to support effective family communication about parental drug dependence.
    European Addiction Research 08/2003; 9(3):113-9. · 2.36 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This paper contributes to a growing literature that suggests that in order to understand the transition to school, one should employ an ecological approach. Such an approach involves simultaneous consideration of individual and contextual factors, studied over time. Much of the current literature on the transition focuses on the transition from the perspective of school, but we were interested in relations between what occurs prior to school and performance in school. We used Bronfenbrenner’s Process-Person-Context-Time (PPCT) ecological model to focus primarily on the relations between school-relevant activities of preschool-aged children and teachers’ subsequent perception of the children’s competence once they had entered school. At Time 1 we observed 20 3-year-olds’ engagement in everyday activities (Process) and their initiation of those activities (Person) over a 20-hour period covering the equivalent of an entire waking day. Children were drawn from two social classes (Context). The preschool observations were followed by 2 consecutive years of teacher reports of academic competence following entry into elementary school (Times 2 and 3). Middle-class preschoolers engaged in more school-relevant activities than did working-class children, and preschoolers who initiated and engaged in more conversations were subsequently perceived by their teachers as being more competent.
    Early Childhood Research Quarterly 01/2003; · 1.67 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This article presents findings from a qualitative, interview-based study of children aged 8-12, conducted in the Irish Republic, which focused on children's experiences of change in family life following parental separation. A good deal of continuity was evident in core aspects of children's lives, such as residence and caregiving, and there were high levels of contact with non-resident parents and extended families. Children adapted best when they felt confident of contact with non-resident parents and received reassurances from both parents of their commitment to their relationships with children.
    Childhood 01/2003; 10(2):163-180. · 1.10 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Parents' values for their children and their beliefs about appropriate child-rearing practices contribute to the ways in which they try to shape their children's development. This paper examines the values and beliefs of 71 parents (37 mothers and 34 fathers) from two cities in the United States and Russia. Half of the families were middle class (determined by education and occupation criteria) and half were working class. The results revealed no cross-societal differences in value for self-direction in the children; perhaps reflecting the recent economic and ideological changes in Russia. In contrast, significant social class differences, for both mothers and fathers, were found in child-rearing values and beliefs. Middle class parents in both societies were more likely to value self-direction and believe that children should have freedom in and around the home, whereas working class parents were more likely to believe that children should be expected to conform to rules. The results of this study underscore the role of within-society heterogeneity, as a function of social class, in parents' values and beliefs about child-rearing.
    Infant and Child Development 06/2000; 9(2):105 - 121. · 1.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The goal of this research was to assess the impact of feedback, partner, and shared understanding in the course of problem solving. A sample of 180 6- to 9-year-olds was pretested to discover the children's “rule” for predicting the movement of a mathematical balance beam. For the treatment they either worked alone or with a partner who was equally, less, or more competent, with two-thirds receiving feedback from the materials. They subsequently participated in 2 individual posttests. The results revealed that children receiving feedback improved significantly more than those who did not, but that the presence of a partner was only beneficial when children received no feedback. Irrespective of feedback, those children whose partner exhibited higher-level reasoning were far more likely to benefit from collaboration than those whose partner did not, provided that the pair achieved shared understanding.
    Child Development 11/1996; 67(6):2892 - 2909. · 4.92 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Divorce and parental separation typically involve possible loss of contact or diminished contact with one parent and the potential for reduced parental availability and responsiveness. The primary aim of the present paper is to explore whether and in what way children perceive the nature of their relationships with their non-resident parents to alter, in the context of a changed family environment following parental separation. Much of the emphasis provided by previous studies of relationships with non-resident parents has been on identifying and assessing frequency of contact with these parents. Strikingly absent from these studies is a focus upon close emotional ties and experiences of security in children's relationships with parents no longer living in the family home. Drawing on the perspectives of children themselves, this qualitative study explores experiences of closeness and security with non-resident parents post-separation. Children's narratives and perspectives on quality in their relationships with non-resident parents provide us with greater insight into factors which may facilitate or obstruct positive experiences of closeness and security with non-resident parents, within the changing family situation which parental separation brings about.
  • Source
    Diane M. Hogan

Publication Stats

84 Citations
22.51 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1996–2012
    • Trinity College Dublin
      • School of Psychology
      Dublin, L, Ireland
  • 2011
    • Dublin Institute of Technology
      Dublin, Leinster, Ireland
  • 2003
    • Dublin City University
      Dublin, Leinster, Ireland