Daniel Dias Ribeiro

Leiden University Medical Centre, Leyden, South Holland, Netherlands

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Publications (33)84.96 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Thromboelastometry was used to evaluate blood coagulation in anesthetized rats after intravenous administration of Tityus serrulatus scorpion venom (Tx). Tracheostomy followed by catheterization of the left jugular vein and right carotid artery were performed for Tx or Ringer's lactate solution injection and blood sample harvesting, respectively. Blood samples were obtained at the beginning of the experiments (baseline) and at two, five, 15, 30, and 60 min after intoxication. The following coagulation parameters were analyzed: CT (Clotting Time), CFT (Clotting Formation Time), Alpha Angle (α), MCF (Maximum Clot Firmness) and TPI (Thrombodynamic Potential Index). Toxin-induced hypercoagulability was demonstrated at the 15 and 60 min. We hypothesize Tx-induced hypercoagulability and enhanced clot formation could be explained by catecholamine release, systemic inflammatory response, and complement system activation, at least in the first hour after envenomation. Further studies are needed to determine the molecular mechanism of Tx-induced coagulopathy.
    Toxicon 11/2014; · 2.92 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Recent studies have demonstrated association between ABO blood system and thrombosis, indicating that individuals belonging to non-O blood groups (A, B or AB) present an increased risk of venous thrombosis, heart disease, and ischemic stroke (IS) as compared to O blood group carriers. In this study, we investigated the frequency of ABO blood group polymorphisms and its association with IS and peripheral arterial disease. Significant differences were observed for O1 (OR 0.57, 95 % CI 0.35-0.95, p < 0.05) and O2 (OR 3.47, 95 % CI 1.15-10.28, p < 0.05) alleles among IS patients while significant differences were observed for B phenotype (26.3 vs 9.5 %, OR 3.42, 95 % CI 1.32-8.76, p = 0.01, patients vs controls, respectively) and alleles A1 (OR 0.31, 95 % CI 0.11-0.84, p < 0.05), O2 (OR 4.61, 95 % CI 1.59-13.23, p < 0.01) and B (OR 3.42, 95 % CI 1.62-7.13, p < 0.001) alleles for PAD patients. O1 allele was an independent variable (OR 0.27, 95 % CI 0.12-0.57, p < 0.001) for IS patients. These data suggest the relationship of non-O blood groups in pathogenesis of thrombosis events and a possible protective effect of O blood group.
    Molecular Biology Reports 01/2014; · 2.51 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In thrombophilic families, protein S deficiency is clearly associated with venous thrombosis. We aimed to determine whether the same holds true in a population-based case-control study (n=5317). Subjects were regarded protein S deficient when protein S levels were <2.5th percentile of the controls. Free- and total protein S deficiency was not associated with venous thrombosis: free protein S <53 U/dL, odds ratio [OR] 0.82 (95%CI, 0.56-1.21) and total protein S <68 U/dL, OR 0.90 (95%CI, 0.62-1.31). When lower cut-off values were applied, it appeared that subjects at risk of venous thrombosis could be identified at levels <0.10th percentile of free protein S (<33 U/dL, OR 5.4; 95% CI, 0.61-48.8). In contrast, even extremely low total protein S levels were not associated with venous thrombosis. PROS1 was sequenced in 48 subjects with free protein S level <1st percentile (<46 U/dL), and copy number variations were investigated in 2718 subjects, including all subjects with protein S (free or total) <2.5th percentile. Mutations in PROS1 were detected in five patients and five controls reinforcing the observation that inherited protein S deficiency is rare in the general population. Protein S testing and PROS1 testing should not be considered in unselected patients with venous thrombosis.
    Blood 09/2013; · 9.78 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Rifampicin remains one of the first-line drugs used in tuberculosis therapy. This drug s potential to induce the hepatic cytochrome P450 oxidative enzyme system increases the risk of drug-drug interactions. Thus, although the presence of comorbidities typically necessitates the use of multiple drugs, the co-administration of rifampicin and warfarin may lead to adverse drug events. We report a bleeding episode after termination of the co-administration of rifampicin and warfarin and detail the challenges related to international normalized ratio (INR) monitoring. CASE PRESENTATION: A 59-year-old Brazilian woman chronically treated with warfarin for atrial fibrillation (therapeutic INR range: 2.0-3.0) was referred to a multidisciplinary anticoagulation clinic at a university hospital. She showed anticoagulation resistance at the beginning of rifampicin therapy, as demonstrated by repeated subtherapeutic INR values. Three months of sequential increases in the warfarin dosage were necessary to reach a therapeutic INR, and frequent visits to the anticoagulation clinic were needed to educate the patient about her pharmacotherapy and to perform the warfarin dosage adjustments. The warfarin dosage also had to be doubled at the beginning of rifampicin therapy. However, four weeks after rifampicin discontinuation, an excessively high INR was observed (7.22), with three-day macroscopic hematuria and the need for an immediate reduction in the warfarin dosage. A therapeutic and stable INR was eventually attained at 50% of the warfarin dosage used by the patient during tuberculosis therapy. CONCLUSIONS: The present case exemplifies the influence of rifampicin therapy on warfarin dosage requirements and the increased risk of bleeding after rifampicin discontinuation. Additionally, this case highlights the need for warfarin weekly monitoring after stopping rifampicin until the maintenance dose of warfarin has decreased to the amount administered before rifampicin use. In particular, patients with cardiovascular diseases and active tuberculosis represent a group with a substantial risk of drug-drug interactions. Learning how to predict and monitor drug-drug interactions may help reduce the incidence of clinically significant adverse drug events.
    BMC pharmacology & toxicology. 05/2013; 14(1):27.
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    ABSTRACT: Strategies targeting at classifying the risk for recurrent venous thrombosis are needed. We previously hypothesized, by studying a cohort of patients, that those who had 'survived' risk situations for venous thrombosis without developing it would, after a first venous thrombosis, have a low recurrence risk. Therefore, we re-evaluated the same cohort, now with a longer follow-up. Patients, after a first confirmed venous thrombosis event, were followed for an average of 43 months after suspension of anticoagulation. Patients with indication for indefinite anticoagulation were not included. The primary endpoint was objective recurrent venous thrombosis. Recurrent venous thrombosis was recorded in 9% of 378 eligible patients. Patients with a provoked first event and positive past risk situations for venous thrombosis had an incidence rate of recurrence of 1.26 (95% CI, 0.60-2.31) per 100 patient-years. The incidence rate ratio (IRR) of this subgroup compared with patients with a provoked event without other past risk situations for venous thrombosis was 0.8 (95% CI 0.2-2.9). This IRR was 2.8 (95% CI, 1.2-6.5) in patients with an unprovoked event and positive past risk situations and 7.1 (95% CI, 3.0-17.1) in patients with an unprovoked event and no past risk situations. When only idiopathic first events were evaluated the IRR was 2.5 (95% CI, 1.1-5.9) for patients without past risk situation compared with those with these history. In this study, asking a patient about past exposure to risk factors for venous thrombosis long before the occurrence of a first venous thrombosis occurred, could be used to classify patients with a first unprovoked venous thrombosis at higher risk for recurrence of venous thrombosis.
    Blood coagulation & fibrinolysis: an international journal in haemostasis and thrombosis 03/2013; · 1.25 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Christensen et al question whether our recent study regarding seasonal variance to the occurrence of venous thrombotic events, and its conclusion, is valid [1,2]. We appreciate the authors' concern and would like to commend the authors' way of discussing our findings by contrasting these to findings from Denmark on seasonal variance and venous thrombosis risk. We studied 5,343 patients with thrombosis from Milan, Leiden and Tromsø, spanning a nearly 3000 km long north-south axis over Europe, and found a 2.3% lower incidence in Spring than in Summer. Christensen at al included 152,548 patients from Denmark, and found an incidence rate ratio of Winter over Summer of 1.19. We offer four points with which to contend Christensen claims on the origin of our different findings, and their clinical relevance. © 2013 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.
    Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis 03/2013; 11(3). · 6.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Rifampicin remains one of the first-line drugs used in tuberculosis therapy. This drug s potential to induce the hepatic cytochrome P450 oxidative enzyme system increases the risk of drug-drug interactions. Thus, although the presence of comorbidities typically necessitates the use of multiple drugs, the co-administration of rifampicin and warfarin may lead to adverse drug events. We report a bleeding episode after termination of the co-administration of rifampicin and warfarin and detail the challenges related to international normalized ratio (INR) monitoring. CASE PRESENTATION: A 59-year-old Brazilian woman chronically treated with warfarin for atrial fibrillation (therapeutic INR range: 2.0-3.0) was referred to a multidisciplinary anticoagulation clinic at a university hospital. She showed anticoagulation resistance at the beginning of rifampicin therapy, as demonstrated by repeated subtherapeutic INR values. Three months of sequential increases in the warfarin dosage were necessary to reach a therapeutic INR, and frequent visits to the anticoagulation clinic were needed to educate the patient about her pharmacotherapy and to perform the warfarin dosage adjustments. The warfarin dosage also had to be doubled at the beginning of rifampicin therapy. However, four weeks after rifampicin discontinuation, an excessively high INR was observed (7.22), with three-day macroscopic hematuria and the need for an immediate reduction in the warfarin dosage. A therapeutic and stable INR was eventually attained at 50% of the warfarin dosage used by the patient during tuberculosis therapy. CONCLUSIONS: The present case exemplifies the influence of rifampicin therapy on warfarin dosage requirements and the increased risk of bleeding after rifampicin discontinuation. Additionally, this case highlights the need for warfarin weekly monitoring after stopping rifampicin until the maintenance dose of warfarin has decreased to the amount administered before rifampicin use. In particular, patients with cardiovascular diseases and active tuberculosis represent a group with a substantial risk of drug-drug interactions. Learning how to predict and monitor drug-drug interactions may help reduce the incidence of clinically significant adverse drug events
    BMC.Pharmacol.Toxicol. 01/2013; 14:27-.
  • Thrombosis Research 10/2012; · 3.13 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to assess the agreement of four renowned interaction lists on potentially severe warfarin drug interactions (DI) in outpatients at a university hospital in Brazil, specifically in subgroups of Trypanosoma cruzi-infected and non-infected patients and those with previous bleeding episodes. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study in which adult outpatients with heart disease and indications for chronic warfarin use were enrolled. The occurrence of potentially severe warfarin DI was evaluated based on the lists provided by three compendia, i.e., Drug Interaction Facts (DIF), Drug Interactions: Analysis and Management (DIAM) and DRUG-REAX, and by the World Health Organization (WHO) Model Formulary. A kappa coefficient was used to calculate the agreement among the sources. RESULTS: A total of 280 patients were studied. Most patients were female (54.6 %) with an average age of 56.8 (standard deviation 13.1) years. The agreement among the four sources was fair (Fleiss' kappa coefficient = 0.295). T. cruzi-infected individuals were less likely to have severe warfarin DI than non-infected patients (p < 0.05 for DIAM, DRUG-REAX and the WHO Model Formulary). Potentially severe DI were more frequent in patients with previous bleeding episodes, based on the DIF compendia (p = 0.007). CONCLUSIONS: This evaluation of warfarin DI revealed that the disagreement between compendia is also observed in clinical practice. T. cruzi infection is associated with a lower prevalence of potentially severe warfarin DI, but with a wider variation in its detection. Our results suggest a wide spectrum of discrepancies in detecting heart disease patients at higher risk for severe warfarin DI and a possible heterogeneity in clinical guidance.
    European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology 09/2012; · 2.74 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Circannual variability of venous thrombosis has been reported since 1939, but there is no definitive determination of whether it really exists. Although a recent meta-analysis on this topic, including 35 000 patients with venous thrombosis, has recently been published [1], and showed a similar existence of a seasonal variability in venous thrombosis as for arterial cardiovascular disease [2], there are some issues that preclude whether this meta-analysis found a true association between seasonal variability in the incidence of venous thrombosis. © 2012 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.
    Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis 06/2012; 10(8):1704-7. · 6.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE:: to describe the prevalence of main hereditary thrombophilias, Janus Kinase 2 (JAK2) V617F mutation, antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS) and hyperhomocysteinemia in Brazilian children and adolescents diagnosed with portal vein thrombosis (PVT) without associated hepatic disease. METHODS:: a cross-sectional study was carried out with 32 children with PVT in accompaniment at Hospital das Clínicas of the Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais from January 1990 to July 2011. Laboratory evaluation of thrombophilias was performed from September 2010 to July 2011. RESULTS:: thirty-two patients were evaluated, 59% were male. Median age at diagnosis was 2.4yrs. Mean time of patients' accompaniment was between 4.7 and 5.2yrs. The presence of hereditary and/or acquired thrombophilias occurred in 34.4% of patients, and six of them also showed other risk factors in the previous history evaluation. Risk factors were absent in the previous history of 18 patients (56.3%). Two patients showed persistent high titres of anticardiolipin antibodies. Hyperhomocysteinemia was not observed. One patient was heterozygous for Factor V Leiden and prothrombin G20210A mutation (3,1%). Eleven patients (34.4%) showed heterozygous methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T and no patient had the JAK2V617F mutation. CONCLUSION:: Even after investigation of main hereditary and acquired thrombophilia, PVT remains without apparent cause in most patients. Nevertheless, association of local and systemic risk factors seems to be important also in the pediatric age group. Therefore, despite the low prevalence, a complete investigation, which includes both hereditary and acquired thrombophilias, may be necessary.
    Journal of pediatric gastroenterology and nutrition 06/2012; · 2.18 Impact Factor
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    Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis 04/2012; 10(6):1179-82. · 6.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Venous thrombosis, including deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, is a common disease that frequently recurs. Recurrence can be prevented by anticoagulants, but this comes at the risk of bleeding. Therefore, assessment of the risk of recurrence is important to balance the risks and benefits of anticoagulant treatment. This review briefly outlines what is currently known about the epidemiology of recurrent venous thrombosis, and focuses in more detail on potential new risk factors for venous recurrence. The general implications of these findings in patient management are discussed.
    Brazilian journal of medical and biological research = Revista brasileira de pesquisas medicas e biologicas / Sociedade Brasileira de Biofisica ... [et al.] 12/2011; 45(1):1-7. · 1.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Venous thrombosis results from the convergence of vessel wall injury and/or venous stasis, known as local triggering factors, and the occurrence of acquired and/or inherited thrombophilia, also known as systemic prothrombotic risk factors. Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) and Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS) are caused by thrombosis and/or obstruction of the extrahepatic portal veins and the hepatic venous outflow tract, respectively. Several divergent prothrombotic disorders may underlie these distinct forms of large vessel thrombosis. While cirrhotic PVT is relatively common, especially in advanced liver disease, noncirrhotic and nontumoral PVT is rare and BCS is of intermediate incidence. In this article, we review pathogenic mechanisms and current concepts of patient management.
    Hematology/oncology clinics of North America 10/2011; 25(5):1049-66, vi-vii. · 2.05 Impact Factor
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    Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis 07/2011; 9(10):2120-2. · 6.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Detecting potential drug interactions can lead to early interventions that protect patients from serious drug-related problems. The aim of this study was to evaluate the agreement among the lists of warfarin interactions provided by five information sources. The lists of warfarin interactions and the corresponding severity ratings and documentation levels presented by the three compendia and by the World Health Organization (WHO) Model Formulary were all compared, and each list was compared to that provided on the package insert of Marevan, a brand of warfarin. The compendia used were: Drug Interaction Facts, Drug Interactions: Analysis and Management and DRUG-REAX. A kappa coefficient was used to calculate the agreement among the sources. A total of 537 interactions were listed. Only 13 (2.4%) were common to the five sources. The global Fleiss' kappa coefficient was -0.0080, which indicated poor agreement. Eleven warfarin interactions appeared only in the Marevan package insert. Importantly, 243 interactions (45.3% of the total) were deemed significant in at least one compendium. Only two warfarin interactions were reported as critical by all three compendia and by WHO. The most critical interactions cited by the compendia were missing from the package insert. Poor agreement was found among five sources listing warfarin interactions. Potentially severe clinical consequences might occur due to these discrepant recommendations. Finally, the lack of standard terminology and clinical guidance, as well as the possible inaccuracy of severity ratings and documentation might contribute to heterogeneous procedures in clinical practice.
    European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology 06/2011; 67(12):1301-8. · 2.74 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Strategies that can classify the risk for recurrent venous thrombosis are needed. Some patients may have experienced many risk situations during their life time without developing venous thrombosis (VT), while others may have experienced few of such risk factors and then develop VT idiopathically or after a single provoked risk factor. We hypothesized that those who had 'survived' many risk situations without developing VT would, after a first VT, have a low recurrence risk. Brazilian tertiary hospital cohort was followed for an average of 30 months after anticoagulation withdrawal for a first VT. Patients with indication for indefinite anticoagulation were not included. The primary end point was objective recurrent VT. Recurrent VT was recorded in 7% of 378 eligible patients. Patients with a provoked first event and positive past risk situations for VT had an incidence rate of recurrence of 1.16 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.47-2.39) per 100 patient-years. The incidence rate ratio (IRR) of this subgroup compared to patients with a provoked event without other past risk situations for VT was 1.1 (95% CI, 0.3-4.4). This IRR was 3.3 (95% CI, 1.3-8.7) in patients with an unprovoked event and positive past risk situations and 5.1 (95% CI, 1.6-16.1) in patients with an unprovoked event and no past risk situations. Asking a patient about past exposure of venous thrombosis risk factors long before the occurrence of a first venous thrombosis occurred, does not provide information to classify patients at lower risk for recurrence of venous thrombosis.
    Thrombosis Research 05/2011; 128(3):227-32. · 3.13 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The 4G/5G polymorphism in the plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) gene, has been associated with arterial disease. In this study, we investigated the association of IS in young patients with CRP and PAI-1 levels and frequency of insertion-deletion polymorphism of PAI-1 gene. The plasma levels of PAI-1 and CRP and the frequency of 4G/5G polymorphism were analyzed in 127 Brazilian young patients that presented IS and in 201 healthy and unrelated control subjects. The levels of CRP (P < 0.001) and PAI-1 (P < 0.001) were significantly higher in patients when compared with control group. Only PAI-1 plasma levels were independently associated with risk of IS (OR 3.40; 95% CI 1.49-7.74; P = 0.001) after adjustments for lifestyles covariates. The 4G/4G genotype was significantly more frequent among control subjects as compared to patients (OR 0.41; 95% CI 0.24-0.68; P < 0.001). Although increased PAI-1 plasma levels are associated with development of IS in Brazilian young patients, they are not influenced by the 4G/5G PAI-1 polymorphism.
    Molecular Biology Reports 03/2011; 38(8):5355-60. · 2.51 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Liver transplant (LT) surgery is associated with significant bleeding in 20% of cases, and several authors have demonstrated the risks related to blood components. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the impact of using blood components during hospitalization in five-year survival of patients undergoing LT. One hundred and thirteen patients were evaluated retrospectively. Several variables, including the use of blood components intraoperatively and throughout hospitalization, were categorized and evaluated by univariate analysis using Fisher's test. A level of significance of 5% was adopted. Results with p < 0.2 underwent multivariate analysis using multinomial logistic regression. Parenchymal diseases, preoperative renal dysfunction, and longer stay in hospital and ICU are associated with greater five-year mortality after LT (p < 0.05). Unlike the intraoperative use of blood components, the accumulated transfusion of packed red blood cell, frozen fresh plasma, and platelets during the entire hospitalization was associated with greater five-year mortality after liver transplantation (p < 0.01). This study emphasizes the relationship between the use of blood components during hospitalization and increased mortality in five years after LT.
    Revista brasileira de anestesiologia 01/2011; 61(3):286-92.
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    ABSTRACT: Experimental studies of uncontrolled hemorrhage demonstrated that permissive hypotension (PH) reduces blood loss, but its effect on clot formation remains unexplored. Desmopressin (DDAVP) enhances platelet adhesion promoting stronger clots. We hypothesized PH and DDAVP have additive effects and reduce bleeding in uncontrolled hemorrhage. Rabbits (n = 42) randomized as follows: sham; normal blood pressure (NBP) resuscitation; PH resuscitation-60% baseline mean arterial pressure; NBP plus DDAVP 1 hour before (DDAVP NBP) or 15 minutes after beginning of shock (DDAVP T1 NBP); and PH plus DDAVP 1 hour before (DDAVP PH) or 15 minutes after beginning of shock (DDAVP T1 PH). Fluid resuscitation started 15 minutes after aortic injury and ended at 85 minutes. Intraabdominal blood loss was calculated, aortic clot sent for electron microscopy. Activated partial thromboplastin time, platelet count, thromboelastometry, arterial blood gases, and complete blood count were performed at baseline and 85 minutes. Analysis of variance was used for comparison. NBP received more fluid volume and had greater intraabdominal blood loss. DDAVP, when administered preshock, significantly reduced blood loss in NBP and fluid requirement when given postshock. Platelets, arterial blood gas, complete blood count, and activated partial thromboplastin time were similar at 85 minutes. NBP delayed clot formation and worsened thrombodynamic potential on thromboelastometry, whereas PH and DDAVP improved. Electron microscopy showed lack of fibrin on NBP clots, whereas DDAVP and PH clots displayed exuberant fibrin/platelet aggregates. DDAVP NBP presented intermediate clots. PH reduced bleeding and improved hemostasis compared with normotensive resuscitation. DDAVP given preshock exerted similar effects with normotensive resuscitation.
    The Journal of trauma 01/2010; 68(1):42-50; discussion 50-1. · 2.35 Impact Factor