M P A Mayer

University of São Paulo, San Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil

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Publications (31)81.06 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease that results from an interaction between dental biofilm agents and the host immune-inflammatory response. Periodontopathogenic organisms, such as Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, and Treponema denticola, as well as the host's susceptibility, represented by the host's genetic makeup, are the key factors that influence this complex disease. Recently, we identified haplotypes in the IL4 gene that were associated with chronic periodontitis (CP). This study aimed to evaluate whether subjects with different IL4 haplotypes (TCI/CCI and TTD/CTI) would be differentially colonized by periodontopathogens and whether they would respond differently to non-surgical periodontal therapy. Thirty-nine patients carrying the IL4 haplotype of genetic susceptibility to CP (IL4+) or protection against CP (IL4-) were evaluated. Those groups were further subdivided into individuals with CP (CP IL4+ or CP IL4-) and those that were periodontally healthy (H) (H IL4+ or H IL4-). CP patients were submitted to non-surgical periodontal therapy. Clinical and microbiological analyses were performed considering the data at baseline and 45 and 90 days after periodontal therapy. Periodontopathogens levels were evaluated by absolute quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The baseline data revealed that the total levels of periodontopathogens were higher in the CP IL4+ than in the CP IL4- groups. Clinical analyses revealed that the periodontal therapy was equally effective, independent of the subject's IL4 genetic load. The TCI/CCI IL4 haplotype, previously associated with genetic susceptibility to CP, was also associated with increased levels of periodontopathogenic bacteria, but this genetic background did not influence the response to non-surgical periodontal treatment.
    European Journal of Clinical Microbiology 06/2013; · 3.02 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Chronic periodontitis (CP) is considered to be a multifactorial disease influenced by microbial and genetic factors. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the genetic susceptibility to CP in individuals with the IL8 ATC/TTC haplotype is associated with subgingival levels of periodontopathogens. Sixty-five individuals, grouped according to the presence (n = 28) or absence (n = 37) of the IL8 haplotype, were evaluated. After clinical periodontal evaluation, each group was subdivided according to the presence (CP) or absence (H) of periodontitis. Four subgingival samples were obtained from CP and two samples per subject from H patients. The levels and proportions of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, and Treponema denticola were analyzed using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (q-PCR). No differences were found in the proportion of periodontopathogenic bacteria between groups with the presence or absence of the IL8 haplotype. However, in the CP groups, the levels of periodontopathogens were significantly higher in the individuals without the IL8 haplotype than in the individuals with the IL8 haplotype. These results suggest that periodontal destruction may occur in patients who are considered to be genetically susceptible to CP with a lower microbial challenge because of the presence of the IL8 ATC/TTC haplotype than in patients without this haplotype.
    European Journal of Clinical Microbiology 05/2013; · 3.02 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Periodontopathogens experience several challenges in the oral cavity that may influence their transcription profile and resulting phenotype. This study evaluated the effect of environmental changes on phenotype and gene expression in a serotype b Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans isolate. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Cultures in early exponential phase and at the start of stationary growth phase in microaerophilic and anaerobic atmospheres were evaluated. Cell hydrophobic properties were measured by adherence to n-hexadecane; in addition, adhesion to, and the ability to invade, KB cells was evaluated. Relative transcription of 12 virulence-associated genes was determined by real-time reverse transcritption quantitative PCR. RESULTS: The culture conditions tested in this study were found to influence the phenotypic and genotypic traits of A. actinomycetemcomitans. Cells cultured in microaerophilic conditions were the most hydrophobic, reached the highest adhesion efficiency and showed up-regulation of omp100 (which encodes an adhesion) and pga (related to polysaccharide synthesis). Cells grown anaerobically were more invasive to epithelial cells and showed up-regulation of genes involved in host-cell invasion or apoptosis induction (such as apaH, omp29, cagE and cdtB) and in adhesion to extracellular matrix protein (emaA). CONCLUSION: Environmental conditions of different oral habitats may influence the expression of factors involved in the binding of A. actinomycetemcomitans to host tissues and the damage resulting thereby, and thus should be considered in in-vitro studies assessing its pathogenic potential.
    Journal of Periodontal Research 04/2013; · 1.99 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Archaea present distinct features from bacteria and eukaryotes, and thus constitute one of the branches of the phylogenetic tree of life. Members of this domain colonize distinct niches in the human body, arranged in complex communities, especially in the intestines and the oral cavity. The diversity of archaea within these niches is limited to a few phylotypes, constituted in particular by methane-producing archaeal organisms. Although they are possibly symbionts, methanogens may play a role in the establishment of mucosal diseases by favouring the growth of certain bacterial groups.
    Clinical Microbiology and Infection 06/2012; 18(9):834-40. · 4.58 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Gonçalves LFH, Fermiano D, Feres M, Figueiredo LC, Teles FRP, Mayer MPA, Faveri M. Levels of Selenomonas species in generalized aggressive periodontitis. J Periodont Res 2012; 47: 711-718. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S Background and Objective:  To compare the levels of Selenomonas sputigena and uncultivated/unrecognized Selenomonas species in subgingival biofilms from periodontally healthy subjects and from subjects with generalized aggressive periodontitis. Material and Methods:  Fifteen periodontally healthy subjects and 15 subjects with generalized aggressive periodontitis were recruited and their clinical periodontal parameters were evaluated. Nine subgingival plaque samples were collected from each subject and all were individually analyzed for the levels of 10 bacterial taxa, including cultured and uncultivated/unrecognized microorganisms, using the RNA-oligonucleotide quantification technique. Between-group differences in the levels of the test taxa were determined using the Mann-Whitney U-test. Results:  Subjects with generalized aggressive periodontitis showed significantly higher mean counts of Porphyromonas gingivalis, S. sputigena and the Mitsuokella sp. Human Oral Taxon (HOT) 131 (previously described as Selenomonas sp. oral clone CS002), while higher mean counts of Actinomyces gerencseriae and Streptococcus sanguinis were found in periodontally healthy subjects (p < 0.01). Selenomonas sp. HOT 146 was only detected in the generalized aggressive periodontitis group. In the generalized aggressive periodontitis group, the levels of P. gingivalis and S. sputigena were higher in deep sites (probing depth ≥ 5 mm) than in shallow sites (probing depth ≤ 3 mm) (p < 0.01). Furthermore, in subjects with generalized aggressive periodontitis, sites with probing depth of ≤ 3 mm harbored higher levels of these two species than sites with the same probing depth in periodontally healthy subjects. There were positive correlations between probing depth and the levels of P. gingivalis (r = 0.77; p < 0.01), S. sputigena (r = 0.60; p < 0.01) and Selenomonas dianae (previously described as Selenomonas sp. oral clone EW076) (r = 0.42, p < 0.05). Conclusion:  S. sputigena and Mitsuokella sp. HOT 131 may be associated with the pathogenesis of generalized aggressive periodontitis, and their role in the onset and progression of this infection should be investigated further.
    Journal of Periodontal Research 05/2012; 47(6):711-8. · 1.99 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Periodontal diseases result from the interaction of bacterial pathogens with the host's gingival tissue. Gingival epithelial cells are constantly challenged by microbial cells and respond by altering their transcription profiles, inducing the production of inflammatory mediators. Different transcription profiles are induced by oral bacteria and little is known about how the gingival epithelium responds after interaction with the periodontopathogenic organism Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. In the present study, we examined the transcription of genes involved in signaling transduction pathways in gingival epithelial cells exposed to viable A. actinomycetemcomitans. Immortalized gingival epithelial cells (OBA-9) were infected with A. actinomycetemcomitans JP2 for 24 h and the transcription profile of genes encoding human signal transduction pathways was determined. Functional analysis of inflammatory mediators positively transcribed was performed by ELISA in culture supernatant and in gingival tissues. Fifteen of 84 genes on the array were over-expressed (P < 0.01) after 24 h of infection with viable A. actinomycetemcomitans. Over-expressed genes included those implicated in tissue remodeling and bone resorption, such as CSF2, genes encoding components of the LDL pathway, nuclear factor-κB-dependent genes and other cytokines. The ELISA data confirmed that granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor/colony-stimulating factor 2, tumor necrosis factor-α and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 were highly expressed by infected gingival cells when compared with control non-infected cells, and presented higher concentrations in tissues from patients with aggressive and chronic periodontitis than in tissues from healthy controls. The induction in epithelial cells of factors such as the pro-inflammatory cytokine CSF2, which is involved in osteoclastogenesis, may help to explain the outcomes of A. actinomycetemcomitans infection.
    Molecular oral microbiology. 02/2012; 27(1):23-33.
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    ABSTRACT: This study evaluated the prevalence and the molecular diversity of Archaea in the subgingival biofilm samples of subjects with peri-implantitis. Fifty subjects were assigned into two groups: Control (n = 25), consisting of subjects with healthy implants; and Test (n = 25), consisting of subjects with peri-implantitis sites, as well as a healthy implant. In the Test group, subgingival biofilm samples were taken from the deepest sites of the diseased implant. In both groups, subgingival biofilm was collected from one site with a healthy implant and from one site with a periodontally healthy tooth. DNA was extracted and the 16S ribosomal RNA gene was amplified with universal primer pairs for Archaea. Amplified genes were cloned and sequenced, and the phylotypes were identified by comparison with known 16S ribosomal RNA sequences. In the Control group, Archaea were detected in two and three sites of the implant and the tooth, respectively. In the Test group, Archaea were detected in 12, 4 and 2 sites of diseased implants, healthy implants and teeth, respectively. Diseased implants presented a significantly higher prevalence of Archaea in comparison with healthy implants and natural teeth, irrespective of group. Over 90% of the clone libraries were formed by Methanobrevibacter oralis, which was detected in both groups. Methanobacterium congelense/curvum was detected in four subjects from the Test group and in two subjects from the Control group. Although M. oralis was the main species of Archaea associated with both healthy and diseased implant sites, the data indicated an increased prevalence of Archaea in peri-implantitis sites, and their role in pathogenesis should be further investigated.
    Journal of Periodontal Research 02/2011; 46(3):338-44. · 1.99 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Although certain serotypes of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans are associated more with aggressive periodontitis than are other serotypes, the correlation between distinct lineages and virulence traits in this species is poorly understood. This study aimed to evaluate the polymorphism of genes encoding putative virulence factors of clinical isolates, and to correlate these findings with A. actinomycetemcomitans serotypes, genotypes and periodontal status of the hosts. Twenty-six clinical isolates from diverse geographic populations with different periodontal conditions were evaluated. Genotyping was performed using pulse-field gel electrophoresis. Polymorphisms in the genes encoding leukotoxin, Aae, ApaH and determinants for serotype-specific O polysaccharide were investigated. The isolates were classified into serotypes a-f, and exhibited three apaH genotypes, five aae alleles and 25 macrorestriction profiles. Two serotype b isolates (7.7%), obtained from Brazilian patients with aggressive periodontitis, were associated with the highly leukotoxic genotype; these isolates showed identical fingerprint patterns and aae and apaH genotypes. Serotype c, obtained from various periodontal conditions, was the most prevalent among Brazilian isolates, and isolates were distributed in two aae alleles, but formed a genetically distinct group based on apaH analysis. Cluster analysis showed a close relationship between fingerprinting genotypes and serotypes/apaH genotypes, but not with aae genotypes. Apart from the deletion in the ltx promoter region, no disease-associated markers were identified. Non-JP2-like strains recovered from individuals with periodontal disease exhibited considerable genetic variation regarding aae/apaH genotypes, serotypes and XhoI DNA fingerprints.
    Journal of Periodontal Research 02/2011; 46(3):310-7. · 1.99 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cytolethal distending toxin (CDT) is a genotoxin produced by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. In spite of its association with pathogenesis, little is known about the humoral immune response against the CDT. This study aimed to test whether subgingival colonization and humoral response to A. actinomycetemcomitans would lead to a response against CDT. Sera from periodontally healthy, localized and generalized aggressive periodontitis and chronic periodontitis subjects (n = 80) were assessed for immunoglobulin G titers to A. actinomycetemcomitans serotypes a/b/c and to each CDT subunit (CdtA, CdtB and CdtC) by ELISA. A. actinomycetemcomitans subgingival levels and neutralization of CDT activity were also analyzed. Sera from 75.0% localized and 81.8% generalized aggressive periodontitis patients reacted to A. actinomycetemcomitans. A response to serotype b was detected in localized (66.7%) and generalized aggressive periodontitis (54.5%). Reactivity to A. actinomycetemcomitans correlated with subgingival colonization (R = 0.75, p < 0.05). There was no correlation between A. actinomycetemcomitans colonization or response to serotypes and the immunoglobulin G response to CDT subunits. Titers of immunoglobulin G to CdtA and CdtB did not differ among groups; however, sera of all generalized aggressive periodontitis patients reacted to CdtC. Neutralization of CDT was not correlated with levels of antibodies to CDT subunits. Response to CdtA and CdtB did not correlate with the periodontal status of the subject in the context of an A. actinomycetemcomitans infection. However, a response to CdtC was found in sera of generalized but not of localized aggressive periodontitis subjects. Differences in response to CdtC between generalized and localized aggressive periodontitis subjects indicate that CDT could be expressed differently by the infecting strains. Alternatively, the antibody response to CdtC could require the colonization of multiple sites.
    Journal of Periodontal Research 03/2010; 45(4):471-80. · 1.99 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study aimed to test the hypothesis that dentine alterations induced by 810 nm-diode laser may affect the interaction between root canal sealers and the dentin wall. Seventy-two single root human teeth were selected and root canals were enlarged with K-files. Dentine was treated with 0.5% NaOCl and 17% EDTA-T and irradiated (laser group) by diode laser (810 nm/P = 2.5W/I = 1989 W/cm2) or remained non-irradiated (control group). Six samples per group were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The remaining samples of each group were divided into three subgroups (n = 10) and sealed with one of the tested sealers (N-Rickert/AHPlus™/Apexit®). Apical leakage was estimated by evaluating penetration of 0.5% methylene-blue dye. SEM analysis revealed that dentine at the apical third in irradiated samples was melted and fusioned whereas non-irradiated samples exhibited opened dentinal tubules. Despite the morphological changes induced by irradiation, laser did not affect the sealing ability of N-Rickert and AHPlusTM sealers. However, the length of apical leakage in roots filled with Apexit® was lower in irradiated root canals than in non-irradiated samples (p < 0.05). Morphological changes of root canal walls promoted by diode laser irradiation may improve de sealing ability of Apexit®, a calcium hydroxide-based sealer, suggesting that improved sealing promoted by irradiation may represent an additional factor contributing to the endodontic clinical outcome.
    Laser Physics 01/2010; 20(6):1486-1490. · 2.55 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Very little is known of the diversity and expression of virulence factors of serotypes of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. Toxic activity on Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells and cdt and ltx genotyping were evaluated in A. actinomycetemcomitans serotypes. Forty-one A. actinomycetemcomitans isolates were analysed for CHO cell growth inhibition. Genotyping was performed by polymerase chain reactions specific to the ltx promoter region, serotype-specific and cdt region and by sequencing of cdtB. cdtABC was detected in 40 strains. Analysis of the cdtA upstream region revealed 10 cdt genotypes. Toxicity to CHO cells was detected for 92.7% of the isolates; however, no correlation between the toxic activity and the cdt genotype was detected. Serotype c was more prevalent among Brazilian samples (68.0%). Four serotype b isolates from subjects with aggressive periodontitis were associated with high leukotoxin production and exhibited moderate to strong toxic activity in CHO cells, but were classified in different cdt genotypes. High levels of toxicity in CHO cells were not associated with a particular serotype; 57.1% of serotype a isolates presented low toxicity to CHO cells whereas the highly toxic strains belonged to serotypes b and c. Sequencing of cdtB revealed a single nucleotide polymorphism of amino acid 281 but this was not related to the toxic activity in CHO cells. Differences in prevalence of the low and highly cytotoxic strains among serotypes reinforce the hypothesis that serotype b and c isolates of A. actinomycetemcomitans are more virulent than serotype a strains.
    Oral Microbiology and Immunology 12/2009; 24(6):493-501. · 2.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We report the use of optical coherence tomography (OCT) to detect and quantify demineralization process induced by S. mutans biofilm in third molars human teeth. Artificial lesions were induced by a S. mutans microbiological culture and the samples (N = 50) were divided into groups according to the demineralization time: 3, 5, 7, 9, and 11days. The OCT system was implemented using a light source delivering an average power of 96 mu W in the sample arm, and spectral characteristics allowing 23 mu m of axial resolution. The images were produced with lateral scans step of 10 pan and analyzed individually. As a result of the evaluation of theses images, lesion depth was calculated as function of demineralization time. The depth of the lesion in the root dentine increased from 70 pm to 230,urn (corrected by the enamel refraction index, 1.62 @ 856 nm), depending of exposure time. The lesion depth in root dentine was correlated to demineralization time, showing that it follows a geometrical progression like a bacteria growth law. [GRAPHICS] Progression of lesion depth in root dentine as function of exposure time, showing that it follows a geometrical progression like a bacteria growth law(C) 2009 by Astro Ltd. Published exclusively by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA
    Laser Physics Letters 01/2009; 6(12):896-900. · 7.71 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cytolethal distending toxin (CDT) is a DNA-targeting agent produced by certain pathogenic gram-negative bacteria such as the periodontopathogenic organism Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. CDT targets lymphocytes and other cells causing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, impairing the host immune response and contributing to the persistence of infections caused by this microorganism. In this study we explored the effects of CDT on the innate immune response, by investigating how it affects production of nitric oxide (NO) by macrophages. Murine peritoneal macrophages were stimulated with Escherichia coli sonicates and NO production was measured in the presence or not of active CDT. We observed that CDT promptly and significantly inhibited NO production by inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in a dose-dependent manner. This inhibition is directed towards interferon-gamma-dependent pathways and is not mediated by either interleukin-4 or interleukin-10. This mechanism may constitute an important aspect of the immunosuppression mediated by CDT and may have potential clinical implications in A. actinomycetemcomitans infections.
    Oral Microbiology and Immunology 11/2008; 23(5):360-6. · 2.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The present study established a PCR protocol in order to identify Parvimonas micra and to evaluate the intra-species diversity by PCR-RFLP of 16S rRNA partial sequence. The data indicated that the protocol was able to identify this species which could be clustered in five genotypes.
    Brazilian Journal of Microbiology 10/2008; 39(4):605-7. · 0.76 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to determine the bacterial diversity in the subgingival plaque of subjects with generalized aggressive periodontitis by using culture-independent molecular methods based on 16S ribosomal DNA cloning. Samples from 10 subjects with generalized aggressive periodontitis were selected. DNA was extracted and the 16S rRNA gene was amplified with the universal primer pairs 9F and 1525R. Amplified genes were cloned, sequenced, and identified by comparison with known 16S rRNA sequences. One hundred and ten species were identified from 10 subjects and 1007 clones were sequenced. Of these, 70 species were most prevalent. Fifty-seven percent of the clone (40 taxa) sequences represented phylotypes for which no cultivated isolates have been reported. Several species of Selenomonas and Streptococcus were found at high prevalence and proportion in all subjects. Overall, 50% of the clone libraries were formed by these two genera. Selenomonas sputigena, the species most commonly detected, was found in nine of 10 subjects. Other species of Selenomonas were often present at high levels, including S. noxia, Selenomonas sp. EW084, Selenomonas sp. EW076, Selenomonas FT050, Selenomonas sp. P2PA_80, and Selenomonas sp. strain GAA14. The classical putative periodontal pathogens, such as, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, was below the limit of detection and was not detected. These data suggest that other species, notably species of Selenomonas, may be associated with disease in generalized aggressive periodontitis subjects.
    Oral Microbiology and Immunology 05/2008; 23(2):112-8. · 2.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Streptococcus mutans exhibits extensive genotypic diversity, but the role of this variation is poorly understood. This study aimed to determine the number and distribution of genotypes of S. mutans isolated from caries-active and caries-free children and to evaluate some of their phenotypic traits. Stimulated saliva, tongue surface and biofilms over sound and carious teeth surfaces were sampled from 10 caries-free and 11 caries-active children aged 5-8 years. A total of 339 isolates of S. mutans were genotyped by arbitrarily primed polymerase chain reaction using OPA2 primer. One isolate from each genotype was tested for its acid susceptibility and its ability to form a biofilm. Fifty-one distinct genotypes were determined, one to three genotypes in each oral sample. A single genotype was detected in seven children, whereas the remaining 14 children exhibited two to seven genotypes. There were no significant differences in the number of genotypes detected in caries-free and caries-active children. No correlation was observed between the number of genotypes and the mutans streptococci salivary levels. Five of the six high biofilm-forming genotypes were obtained from caries-active children, although the differences in biofilm formation between isolates from caries-free and caries-active children were not statistically significant. Genotypes with low susceptibility to acid challenge were statistically more frequent among isolates from caries-active children than among those from caries-free children. The present data suggested that there were differences in the distribution of genotypes of S. mutans according to the oral site and that S. mutans populations differ in their acid susceptibility and ability to form biofilms, factors allowing their colonization of sucrose-rich environments.
    Oral Microbiology and Immunology 11/2007; 22(5):313-9. · 2.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Adhesion to and invasion of epithelial cells by the periodontopathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis is promoted by the major fimbriae, encoded by fimA. The microorganism can be classified in six genotypes, based on fimA sequence, and genotype II strains are more prevalent than others in periodontitis patients. This study aimed to determine the adhesive and invasive abilities on KB cells of different fimA allelic variants of P. gingivalis isolates. Twenty-two isolates and six reference strains representing the six fimA genotypes and non-typeable strains were screened for their adhesion and invasion abilities on KB cells, using standard methods. All strains were able to adhere and, except for one, to invade KB cells. However, these properties were not homogeneous among strains belonging to the same genotype. There was no correlation between adhesion and invasion efficiencies. Isolate KdII 865 (fimA genotype II) was the most invasive and the second most adhesive strain, whereas reference strain ATCC 33277 (fimA I) showed a low adhesion ability but was highly invasive. These data indicated that fimA genotypes of P. gingivalis are not related to the adhesion and invasion abilities on KB cells, suggesting that the increased prevalence and proportion of certain genotypes may be attributed to other characteristics besides FimA variation.
    Oral Microbiology and Immunology 01/2007; 21(6):415-9. · 2.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The present study aimed to evaluate if the oral cavity of chronic periodontitis patients can harbor Helicobacter pylori after systemic eradication therapy. Samples of 30 patients (15 with gingivitis and 15 with chronic periodontitis) positive for H. pylori in the stomach were evaluated. Samples were collected 3 months after triple systemic antibiotic therapy from saliva, microbiota from the dorsum of the tongue, supra- and sub-gingival plaque as well as gastric biopsies. DNA of each sample was extracted by the boiling method and used as a template in polymerase chain reaction with the primers JW22/23. Eighteen patients (60%) harboured H. pylori in their mouths. Five patients (16.6%) were positive in saliva, two (6.6%) on the dorsum of the tongue, nine (30%) in supra-gingival plaque, 14 (46.6%) in sub-gingival plaque and three (10%) in the stomach. There was no statistically significant difference between study groups. Eradication of H. pylori after therapy was more effective for the stomach than for the mouth (p<0.001). Mouths of patients with gingivitis or with chronic periodontitis, who are positive for H. pylori in their stomachs, may be considered as reservoirs of these bacteria.
    Journal Of Clinical Periodontology 05/2006; 33(5):329-33. · 3.69 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Serratia marcescens is widely distributed in nature, and has emerged in the last years as an important nosocomial pathogen. The organism may also be found in subgingival biofilm in periodontitis patients. This study aimed to verify the subgingival prevalence of S. marcescens in different periodontal conditions and to evaluate whether the oral cavity would harbor strains similar to those causing infectious diseases. The subgingival occurrence of S. marcescens was determined in 334 subjects. The phenotypic and genotypic diversity of 23 isolates from subgingival biofilm, 22 from extra-oral infections and 10 environmental strains, was compared by prodigiosin production, O and H serotyping and genotyping using polymorphic GC-rich repetitive sequences-polymerase chain reaction. S. marcescens was found more frequently in severe periodontitis patients (4.1%) than in gingivitis (3.2%) and healthy subjects (2.5%), but these differences were not statistically significant. Analysis of serotype distribution, prodigiosin production, and genotyping revealed that environmental strains were markedly different from most human isolates, either oral or extraoral. These data suggest that S. marcescens isolates from subgingival biofilm are not just contaminants from the environment, but that the oral cavity may act as a reservoir of strains able to promote human infections. However, further studies are needed to elucidate the role of this bacterium in the pathogenesis of periodontal diseases.
    Oral Microbiology and Immunology 03/2006; 21(1):53-60. · 2.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Optical Coherence Tomography was used to monitor subsurface caries evolution process in vitro. Human tooth was used and bacteria were employed to induce caries lesions. Twenty-five human third molars, were used in this study. The teeth were cut longitudinally at mesio-distal direction; the surfaces were coated with nail varnish except for two squared windows (2x4 mm); at the cement-enamel junction. Artificial lesions were induced by a S. Mutans microbiological culture. The samples (N = 50) were divided into groups according to the demineralization time: 3, 5, 7, 9 and 11 days. The culture medium, was changed each 48 hours. After the demineralization process the samples were rinsed with double-delonized water and stored in a humid environment. The OCT system(1) was implemented with average power of 96 mu W in the sample arm, providing a 23 mu m of axial resolution. The images were produced with lateral scans step of 10 mu m. The detection system was composed by a detector, a demodulator and a computer. With the images generated by OCT it was possible to determine the lesion depth as function of sample exposition time to microbiological culture. We observed that the depth of the lesion in the root dentine increased from 70 gm to 230 pm, depending of exposure time, and follows the bacterial population growth law. This OCT system accurately depicts hard dental tissue and it was able to detect early caries in its structure, providing a powerful contactless high resolution image of lesions.
    LASERS IN DENTISTRY XII; 01/2006

Publication Stats

532 Citations
81.06 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1998–2013
    • University of São Paulo
      • • Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas (ICB)
      • • Department of Immunology (ICB)
      • • Faculdade de Odontologia (FO) (São Paulo)
      San Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
  • 2011
    • Universidade Guarulhos
      Guarulhos, São Paulo, Brazil
  • 2010
    • Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares
      • Center for Laser and Applications (CLA)
      San Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
  • 2001
    • The Forsyth Institute
      Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States