Lindsey Yourman

University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, United States

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Publications (5)43.85 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Researchers often use the term "successful aging" to mean freedom from disability, yet the perspectives of elders living with late-life disability have not been well described. The purpose of this study was to explore the meaning of successful aging among a diverse sample of community-dwelling elders with late-life disability. DESIGN AND METHODS: Using qualitative grounded theory methodology, we interviewed 56 African American, White, Cantonese-speaking Chinese, and Spanish-speaking Latino disabled elders who participate in On Lok Lifeways, a Program of All-inclusive Care for the Elderly. Through semi-structured interviews with open-ended questions, we explored the elders' perceptions of what successful aging and being old meant to them. RESULTS: Despite experiencing late-life disability, most participants felt they had aged successfully. An overarching theme was that aging results in Living in a New Reality, with two subthemes: Acknowledging the New Reality and Rejecting the New Reality. Participants achieved successful aging by using adaptation and coping strategies to align their perception of successful aging with their experiences. Themes were common across race/ethnic groups but certain strategies were more prominent among different groups. IMPLICATIONS: Across race and ethnic groups, most of these participants with late-life disability felt they had aged successfully. Thus, successful aging involves subjective criteria and has a cultural context that is not captured in objective measurements. Understanding elders' perception will help establish common ground for communication between clinicians and elders and identify the most appropriate interventions to help elders achieve and maintain the experience of successful aging.
    The Gerontologist 12/2012; · 2.48 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To determine perceived quality of life in a diverse population of elderly adults with late-life disability. Qualitative cross-sectional study. Community-dwelling participants were recruited from San Francisco's On Lok Lifeways program, the first Program of All-inclusive Care for the Elderly. On Lok enrollees meet Medicaid criteria for nursing home placement. Sixty-two elderly adults with a mean age of 78 and a mean 2.4 activity of daily living dependencies and 6.6 instrumental activity of daily living dependencies were interviewed. Respondents were 63% female, 24% white, 19% black, 18% Latino, 32% Chinese American, and 6% other race. Elderly adults who scored higher than 17 points on the Mini-Mental State Examination were interviewed. Interviews were conducted in English, Spanish, and Cantonese. Respondents were asked to rate their overall quality of life on a 5-point scale. Open-ended questions explored positive and negative aspects of participants' daily experiences. Interviews were analyzed using modified grounded theory and digital coding software. Eighty-seven percent of respondents rated their quality of life in the middle range of the quality-of-life spectrum (fair to very good). Themes were similar across ethnic groups. Most themes could be grouped into four domains that dependent elderly adults considered important to their quality of life: physical (e.g., pain), psychological (e.g., depression), spiritual or religious (e.g., religious coping), and social (e.g., life-space). Dignity and a sense of control were identified as themes that are the most closely tied to overall quality of life. Factors that influence quality of life in late-life disability were similar across ethnic groups. As the number of elderly adults from diverse backgrounds with late life disability increases in the United States, interventions should be targeted to maximize daily sense of control and dignity.
    Journal of the American Geriatrics Society 01/2012; 60(3):569-76. · 3.98 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To better target services to those who may benefit, many guidelines recommend incorporating life expectancy into clinical decisions. To assess the quality and limitations of prognostic indices for mortality in older adults through systematic review. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane, and Google Scholar from their inception through November 2011. We included indices if they were validated and predicted absolute risk of mortality in patients whose average age was 60 years or older. We excluded indices that estimated intensive care unit, disease-specific, or in-hospital mortality. For each prognostic index, we extracted data on clinical setting, potential for bias, generalizability, and accuracy. We reviewed 21,593 titles to identify 16 indices that predict risk of mortality from 6 months to 5 years for older adults in a variety of clinical settings: the community (6 indices), nursing home (2 indices), and hospital (8 indices). At least 1 measure of transportability (the index is accurate in more than 1 population) was tested for all but 3 indices. By our measures, no study was free from potential bias. Although 13 indices had C statistics of 0.70 or greater, none of the indices had C statistics of 0.90 or greater. Only 2 indices were independently validated by investigators who were not involved in the index's development. We identified several indices for predicting overall mortality in different patient groups; future studies need to independently test their accuracy in heterogeneous populations and their ability to improve clinical outcomes before their widespread use can be recommended.
    JAMA The Journal of the American Medical Association 01/2012; 307(2):182-92. · 29.98 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Prognosis is critical in individualizing care for older adults with late life disability. Evidence suggests that preferences for prognostic information may be culturally determined. Yet little is known about the preferences of diverse elders for discussing prognosis. To determine the preferences for discussing prognosis of a diverse sample of older adults with late-life disability. We interviewed 60 older adults with mean age 78 and mean 2.5 Activities of Daily Living dependencies. Participants were recruited from San Francisco's On Lok program, the first Program of All-inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE). Participants were interviewed in English, Spanish, and Cantonese, and responded to scenarios in which their doctors estimated they had 5 years and 1 year left to live. Open-ended questions explored the reasons for their responses. Results were analyzed qualitatively using grounded theory. Sixty-five percent of participants wanted to discuss the prognosis if their doctor estimated they had <5 years to live and 75% if the estimate was <1 year. Three themes were prominent among patients who wanted to discuss prognosis: to prepare, to make the most of the life they had left, and to make medical or health-related decisions. Those who preferred not to discuss prognosis described emotional difficulty, the uncertainty of prognosis, or that it would not be useful. Nearly all participants said that doctors should not make assumptions based on race or ethnicity, though differences between ethnic groups emerged. Most patients in this diverse sample of disabled elders were interested in discussing prognosis, while a substantial minority was not. Among those participants who preferred to discuss prognosis, many said that prognostic information would be important as they made difficult medical and personal decisions in late-life. Clinicians should inquire about preferences for discussing prognosis before sharing prognostic estimates.
    Journal of General Internal Medicine 11/2011; 27(5):568-75. · 3.28 Impact Factor
  • Lindsey Yourman, John Concato, Joseph V Agostini
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    ABSTRACT: Older adults take multiple medications and are at high risk for adverse drug effects. This systematic review was conducted to describe the impact of computer decision support (CDS) interventions designed to improve the quality of medication prescribing in older adults. PubMed and EMBASE databases were searched from January 1980 through July 2007 (English-language only); studies were eligible if they described a CDS intervention intended to improve medication prescribing in adults aged > or =60 years. Studies were retained if they were observational or experimental in design and reported > or =1 process or clinical outcome measurement related to medication prescribing. In the main analysis, study characteristics and major outcome results were extracted. A combination of searches was performed using relevant medical subject headings: aged; drug therapy, computer-assisted; medication errors; medication errors/prevention and control; decision making, computer-assisted; decision support systems, clinical; and clinical pharmacy information systems. After review of study abstracts, 10 articles met the eligibility criteria. Of those 10 studies testing CDS interventions, 8 showed at least modest improvements (median number needed to treat, 33) in prescribing, as measured by minimizing drugs to avoid, optimizing drug dosage, or more generally improving prescribing choices in older adults (according to each study's intervention protocols). Findings for the impact of CDS interventions on clinical outcomes were mixed and were reported for only 2 studies. Various types of CDS interventions may be effective in improving medication prescribing in older adults, but few studies reported clinical outcomes related to changes in medication prescribing. Data from this study should help to guide refinement and testing of future CDS interventions that specifically target older adult populations that are taking multiple medications.
    The American Journal of Geriatric Pharmacotherapy 06/2008; 6(2):119-29. · 4.13 Impact Factor