Bénédicte Stengel

Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Nancy, Nancy, Lorraine, France

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Publications (86)351.79 Total impact

  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The emergence of new effective therapeutic strategies for the treatment of resistant hypertension such as renal sympathetic denervation technique has lead to a renewed interest in the screening and assessment of prognosis of this specific entity which constitutes a subset of uncontrolled hypertension. Its prevalence is unknown, but estimated between 12 and 15 % among hypertensive subjects from the general population. Several factors have been associated with the development of resistant hypertension, four of which are essential: age, diabetes, chronic kidney disease and vascular structural alteration. Excessive salt intake is also a risk factor for poorly controlled hypertension in patients with salt-dependent hypertension, and may participate to the genesis of resistant hypertension. Because of population ageing and increasing prevalence of diabetes, obesity and chronic kidney disease, the prevalence of resistant hypertension is expected to rise. A better understanding of its determinants and associated risks (such as chronic kidney disease) would identify high-risk groups that may benefit from extensive diagnosis work up and more specific treatments.
    Néphrologie & Thérapeutique 04/2014; · 0.50 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Aims/hypothesis The aim was to study geographic variations and recent trends in the incidence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) by diabetes status and type, and in patient condition and modalities of care at initiation of renal replacement therapy. Methods Data from the French population-based dialysis and transplantation registry of all ESRD patients were used to study geographic variations in 5,857 patients without diabetes mellitus, 227 with type 1 diabetes mellitus, and 3,410 with type 2. Trends in incidence and patient care from 2007 to 2011 were estimated. Results Age- and sex-adjusted incidence rates were higher in the overseas territories than in continental France for ESRD unrelated to diabetes and related to type 2 diabetes, but quite similar for type 1 diabetes-related ESRD. ESRD incidence decreased significantly over time for patients with type 1 diabetes (−10% annually) and not significantly for non-diabetic patients (0.2%), but increased significantly for patients with type 2 diabetes (+7% annually until 2009 and seemingly stabilised thereafter). In type 2 diabetes, the net change in the absolute number was +21%, of which +3% can be attributed to population ageing, +2% to population growth and +16% to the residual effect of the disease. Patients with type 2 diabetes more often started dialysis as an emergency (32%) than those with type 1 (20%) or no diabetes. Conclusions/interpretation The major impact of diabetes on ESRD incidence is due to type 2 diabetes mellitus. Our data demonstrate the need to reinforce strategies for optimal management of patients with diabetes to improve prevention, or delay the onset, of diabetic nephropathy, ESRD and cardiovascular comorbidities, and to reduce the rate of emergency dialysis.
    Diabetologia 04/2014; 57(4). · 6.49 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cystic kidney diseases and toxic interstitial nephritis may be complicated by renal tumors. Long-term lithium intake is associated with tubulointerstitial nephritis and renal cysts but to date such an association with tumors has not been determined. We evaluated this in a retrospective study to determine whether lithium-treated patients were at higher risk of renal tumors compared with lithium-free patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), and to the general population. Over a 16-year period, 14 of 170 lithium-treated patients had renal tumors, including seven malignant and seven benign tumors. The mean duration of lithium exposure at diagnosis was 21.4 years. The renal cancers included three clear-cell and two papillary renal cell carcinomas, one hybrid tumor with chromophobe and oncocytoma characteristics, and one clear-cell carcinoma with leiomyomatous stroma. The benign tumors included four oncocytomas, one mixed epithelial and stromal tumor, and two angiomyolipomas. The percentage of renal tumors, particularly cancers and oncocytomas, was significantly higher in lithium-treated patients compared with 340 gender-, age-, and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR)-matched lithium-free patients. Additionally, the Standardized Incidence Ratio of renal cancer was significantly higher in lithium-treated patients compared with the general population: 7.51 (95% confidence interval (CI) (1.51-21.95)) and 13.69 (95% CI (3.68-35.06)) in men and women, respectively. Thus, there is an increased risk of renal tumors in lithium-treated patients.Kidney International advance online publication, 22 January 2014; doi:10.1038/ki.2014.2.
    Kidney International 01/2014; · 7.92 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The emergence of new effective therapeutic strategies for the treatment of resistant hypertension such as renal sympathetic denervation technique has lead to a renewed interest in the screening and assessment of prognosis of this specific entity which constitutes a subset of uncontrolled hypertension. Its prevalence is unknown, but estimated between 12 and 15 % among hypertensive subjects from the general population. Several factors have been associated with the development of resistant hypertension, four of which are essential: age, diabetes, chronic kidney disease and vascular structural alteration. Excessive salt intake is also a risk factor for poorly controlled hypertension in patients with salt-dependent hypertension, and may participate to the genesis of resistant hypertension. Because of population ageing and increasing prevalence of diabetes, obesity and chronic kidney disease, the prevalence of resistant hypertension is expected to rise. A better understanding of its determinants and associated risks (such as chronic kidney disease) would identify high-risk groups that may benefit from extensive diagnosis work up and more specific treatments.
    Néphrologie & Thérapeutique. 01/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) has been related to the use of gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) in patients undergoing dialysis. The Prospective Fibrose Nephrogénique Systémique study, a French prospective study supported by the French drug regulatory agency (Agence Nationale de Sécurité du Médicament) and the French Societies of Nephrology, Dermatology, and Radiology, aimed at determining the incidence of NSF in patients undergoing long-term dialysis. Adult patients undergoing long-term dialysis receiving a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination prescribed between January 15, 2009 and May 31, 2011, with or without GBCA were included. The methodology was based on a patient form intended to detect any dermatological event (DE) that may occur within 4 months after the examination. Further investigations were planned with their physicians if a DE was reported. A total of 571 patients were included. A total of 50.3% received GBCA. Among them, 93.4% received a macrocyclic GBCA, usually gadoteric acid (88.9%). All in all, 22 patients (3.9%) reported a DE. Dermatological diagnoses did not reveal any evidence of NSF. The incidence of NSF after a single dose of a macrocyclic GBCA is null in our sample of 268 patients undergoing dialysis (hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis). This incidence is just lower than 0.5%. When contrast-enhanced MRI can be essential, or even decisive, to the diagnosis, these results are important and reassuring if physicians need to perform contrast-enhanced MRI in patients undergoing dialysis.
    Investigative radiology 10/2013; · 4.85 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: While much has been learned about the epidemiology and treatment of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in the last 30 years, chronic kidney disease (CKD) before the end-stage has been less investigated. Not enough is known about factors associated with CKD progression and complications, as well as its transition to ESRD. We designed the CKD-renal epidemiology and information network (REIN) cohort to provide a research platform to address these key questions and to assess clinical practices and costs in patients with moderate or advanced CKD. A total of 46 clinic sites and 4 renal care networks participate in the cohort. A stratified selection of clinic sites yields a sample that represents a diversity of settings, e.g. geographic region, and public versus for-profit and non-for-profit private clinics. In each site, 60-90 patients with CKD are enrolled at a routine clinic visit during a 12-month enrolment phase: 3600 total, including 1800 with Stage 3 and 1800 with Stage 4 CKD. Follow-up will continue for 5 years, including after initiation of renal replacement therapy. Data will be collected from medical records at inclusion and at yearly intervals, as well as from self-administered patient questionnaires and provider-level questionnaires. Patients will also be interviewed at baseline, and at 1, 3 and 5 years. Healthcare costs will also be determined. Blood and urine samples will be collected and stored for future studies on all patients at enrolment and at study end, and at 1 and 3 years in a subsample of 1200. The CKD-REIN cohort will serve to improve our understanding of the biological, clinical and healthcare system determinants associated with CKD progression and adverse outcomes as well as of international variations in collaboration with the CKD Outcome and Practice Pattern Study (CKDopps). It will foster CKD epidemiology and outcomes research and provide evidence to improve the health and quality of life of patients with CKD and the performances of the healthcare system in this field.
    Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation 09/2013; · 3.37 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Many common genetic variants identified by genome-wide association studies for complex traits map to genes previously linked to rare inherited Mendelian disorders. A systematic analysis of common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes responsible for Mendelian diseases with kidney phenotypes has not been performed. We thus developed a comprehensive database of genes for Mendelian kidney conditions and evaluated the association between common genetic variants within these genes and kidney function in the general population. Using the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man database, we identified 731 unique disease entries related to specific renal search terms and confirmed a kidney phenotype in 218 of these entries, corresponding to mutations in 258 genes. We interrogated common SNPs (minor allele frequency >5%) within these genes for association with the estimated GFR in 74,354 European-ancestry participants from the CKDGen Consortium. However, the top four candidate SNPs (rs6433115 at LRP2, rs1050700 at TSC1, rs249942 at PALB2, and rs9827843 at ROBO2) did not achieve significance in a stage 2 meta-analysis performed in 56,246 additional independent individuals, indicating that these common SNPs are not associated with estimated GFR. The effect of less common or rare variants in these genes on kidney function in the general population and disease-specific cohorts requires further research.
    Journal of the American Society of Nephrology 09/2013; · 8.99 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background. Incidence rates of renal replacement therapy (RRT) for end-stage renal disease vary consider-ably worldwide. This study examines the independent association between the general population, health care system and renal service characteristics and RRT inci-dence rates. Methods. RRT incidence data (2003–2005) were obtained from renal registries; general population age and health and macroeconomic indices were collected from secondary sources. Renal service organization and resource data were obtained through interviews and questionnaires. Linear regression models were built to establish the factors inde-pendently associated with RRT incidence, stratified by the Human Development Index where required. False discovery rate (FDR) correction was adjusted for multiple testing. Results. Across the 46 countries (population 1.25 billion), RRT incidence rates ranged from 12 to 455 (median 130) per million population. Gross domestic product (GDP) per cap-ita [incidence rate ratio (IRR): 1.02 per $1000 increase, P FDR ¼ 0.047], percentage of GDP spent on health care (IRR: 1.11 per % increase, P FDR ¼ 0.006) and dialysis facility reimbursement rate relative to GDP (IRR: 0.76 per GDP per capita-sized increase in reimbursement rate, P FDR ¼ 0.007) were independently associated with RRT incidence. In more developed countries, the private for-profit share of haemodialysis facilities was also associated with higher incidence (IRR: 1.009 per % increase, P FDR ¼ 0.003). Conclusions. Macroeconomic and renal service factors are more often associated with RRT incidence rates than measured demographic or general population health status factors.
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    ABSTRACT: This chapter provides a set of indicators on incident patients with renal replacement therapy. In 2011, in 25 French regions (99% population), 9 248 patients started a treatment by dialysis (incidence of dialysis: 149 per million inhabitants) and 334 patients with a pre-emptive graft without previous dialysis (incidence of pre-emptive graft: 5 per million inhabitants). One patient among two are over 70 years old at renal replacement therapy initiation. As in 2010, incidence rate seems to stabilize.
    Néphrologie & Thérapeutique 09/2013; 9S1:S19-S37. · 0.50 Impact Factor
  • American Journal of Kidney Diseases 07/2013; 62(1):182–184. · 5.29 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background An increase in the dialysis programme expenditure is expected in most countries given the continued rise in the number of people with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) globally. Since chronic peritoneal dialysis (PD) therapy is relatively less expensive compared with haemodialysis (HD) and because there is no survival difference between PD and HD, identifying factors associated with PD use is important.Methods Incidence counts for the years 2003-05 were available from 36 countries worldwide. We studied associations of population characteristics, macroeconomic factors and renal service indicators with the percentage of patients on PD at Day 91 after starting dialysis. With linear regression models, we obtained relative risks (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs).ResultsThe median percentage of incident patients on PD was 12% (interquartile range: 7-26%). Determinants independently associated with lower percentages of patients on PD were as follows: patients with diabetic kidney disease (per 5% increase) (RR 0.93; 95% CI 0.89-0.97), health expenditure as % gross domestic product (per 1% increase) (RR 0.93; 95% CI 0.87-0.98), private-for-profit share of HD facilities (per 1% increase) (RR 0.996; 95% CI 0.99-1.00; P = 0.04), costs of PD consumables relative to staffing (per 0.1 increase) (RR 0.97; 95% CI 0.95-0.99).Conclusions The factors associated with a lower percentage of patients on PD include higher diabetes prevalence, higher healthcare expenditures, larger share of private-for-profit centres and higher costs of PD consumables relative to staffing. Whether dialysis modality mix can be influenced by changing healthcare organization and funding requires additional studies.
    Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation 03/2013; · 3.37 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The M-type receptor for phospholipase A2 (PLA2R1) is the major target antigen in idiopathic membranous nephropathy (iMN). Our recent genome-wide association study showed that genetic variants in an HLA-DQA1 and phospholipase A2 receptor (PLA2R1) allele associate most significantly with biopsy-proven iMN, suggesting that rare genetic variants within the coding region of the PLA2R1 gene may contribute to antibody formation. Here, we sequenced PLA2R1 in a cohort of 95 white patients with biopsy-proven iMN and assessed all 30 exons of PLA2R1, including canonical (GT-AG) splice sites, by Sanger sequencing. Sixty patients had anti-PLA2R1 in serum or detectable PLA2R1 antigen in kidney tissue. We identified 18 sequence variants, comprising 2 not previously described, 7 reported as rare variants (<1%) in the Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Database or the 1000 Genomes project, and 9 known to be common polymorphisms. Although we confirmed significant associations among 6 of the identified common variants and iMN, only 9 patients had the private or rare variants, and only 4 of these patients were among the 60 who were PLA2R positive. In conclusion, rare variants in the coding sequence of PLA2R1, including splice sites, are unlikely to explain the pathogenesis of iMN.
    Journal of the American Society of Nephrology 02/2013; · 8.99 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The European Renal Association-European Dialysis and Transplant Association (ERA-EDTA) Registry has produced a new set of primary renal diagnosis (PRD) codes that are intended for use by affiliated registries. It is designed specifically for use in renal centres and registries but is aligned with international coding standards supported by the WHO (International Classification of Diseases) and the International Health Terminology Standards Development Organization (SNOMED Clinical Terms). It is available as supplementary material to this paper and free on the internet for non-commercial, clinical, quality improvement and research use, and by agreement with the ERA-EDTA Registry for use by commercial organizations. Conversion between the old and the new PRD codes is possible. The new codes are very flexible and will be actively managed to keep them up-to-date and to ensure that renal medicine can remain at the forefront of the electronic revolution in medicine, epidemiology research and the use of decision support systems to improve the care of patients.
    Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation 11/2012; · 3.37 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Chronic kidney disease, even at moderate stages, is characterized by a high incidence of cardiovascular events. Subclinical damage to large arteries, such as increased arterial stiffness and outward remodeling, is a classical hallmark of patients with chronic kidney disease. Whether large artery stiffness and remodeling influence the occurrence of cardiovascular events and the mortality of patients with chronic kidney disease (stages 2-5) is still debated. This prospective study included 439 patients with chronic kidney disease (mean age, 59.8±14.5 years) with a mean measured glomerular filtration rate of 37 mL/min per 1.73 m(2). Baseline aortic stiffness was estimated through carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity measurements; carotid stiffness, diameter, and intima-media thickness were measured with a high-resolution echotracking system. For the overall group of patients, the 5-year estimated survival and cumulative incidence of cardiovascular events were 87% and 16%, respectively. In regression analyses adjusted on classical cardiovascular and renal risk factors, aortic stiffness remained significantly associated with all-cause mortality (for 1 SD, Cox model-derived relative risk [95% CI], 1.48 [1.09-2.02]) and with fatal and nonfatal cardiovascular events (for 1 SD, Fine and Gray competing risks model-derived relative risk [95% CI], 1.35 [1.05-1.75]). Net reclassification improvement index was significant (29.0% [2.3-42.0%]). Carotid internal diameter was also independently associated with all-cause mortality. This study shows that increased aortic stiffness and carotid internal diameter are independent predictors of mortality in patients with stages 2 to 5 chronic kidney disease and that aortic stiffness improves the prediction of the risk.
    Hypertension 10/2012; · 6.87 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: AIMS: The study aimed to assess the prevalence, quality of screening and treatment of chronic kidney disease (CKD), and their trends between 2001 and 2007, in French adults with type 2 diabetes (T2D). METHODS: The 2007 ENTRED survey randomly selected, from French medical insurance fund databases, 8926 adults treated for diabetes who had been reimbursed at least three times over the previous 12 months for oral hypoglycaemic agents or insulin. Medical reimbursement data were extracted and two sets of questionnaires were mailed, one to all patients (48% response rate) and the other to their doctors (62%). Analyses were restricted to the 3894 responders with T2D (2232 with data from their doctors). Trends between the 2001 and 2007 ENTRED surveys were studied. RESULTS: Participants' mean age was 66 years. The prevalence of CKD was estimated to be at least 29%, based on doctors' data (missing data included). Overall, only 17% had no claims for serum creatinine measurements during the year, and 71% had no claims for albuminuria tests; nonetheless, both figures had decreased from 2001. Older people, those who lived alone and those who felt poorly informed about diabetes were more likely to have made no claims for CKD screening. Assessment of quality of care (prescribing antihypertensive treatment when indicated) was possible for 66% of responders, of whom 25% did not receive such treatment. CONCLUSION: CKD is frequently seen in patients with T2D and is likely to be underestimated because albuminuria screening remains inadequate, despite significant improvements since 2001. Further efforts are needed to improve CKD screening, patient and doctor awareness, and adequate use of antihypertensive/nephroprotective medications.
    Diabetes & Metabolism 10/2012; · 2.39 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Hypertension is the most prevalent comorbidity in individuals with chronic kidney disease. However, whether the association of the kidney disease measures, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and albuminuria, with mortality or end-stage renal disease (ESRD) differs by hypertensive status is unknown. METHODS: We did a meta-analysis of studies selected according to Chronic Kidney Disease Prognosis Consortium criteria. Data transfer and analyses were done between March, 2011, and June, 2012. We used Cox proportional hazards models to estimate the hazard ratios (HR) of mortality and ESRD associated with eGFR and albuminuria in individuals with and without hypertension. FINDINGS: We analysed data for 45 cohorts (25 general population, seven high-risk, and 13 chronic kidney disease) with 1 127 656 participants, 364 344 of whom had hypertension. Low eGFR and high albuminuria were associated with mortality irrespective of hypertensive status in the general population and high-risk cohorts. All-cause mortality risk was 1·1-1·2 times higher in individuals with hypertension than in those without hypertension at preserved eGFR. A steeper relative risk gradient in individuals without hypertension than in those with hypertension at eGFR range 45-75 mL/min per 1·73 m(2) led to much the same mortality risk at lower eGFR. With a reference eGFR of 95 mL/min per 1·73 m(2) in each group to explicitly assess interaction, adjusted HR for all-cause mortality at eGFR 45 mL/min per 1·73 m(2) was 1·77 (95% CI 1·57-1·99) in individuals without hypertension versus 1·24 (1·11-1·39) in those with hypertension (p for overall interaction=0·0003). Similarly, for albumin-creatinine ratio of 300 mg/g (vs 5 mg/g), HR was 2·30 (1·98-2·68) in individuals without hypertension versus 2·08 (1·84-2·35) in those with hypertension (p for overall interaction=0·019). We recorded much the same results for cardiovascular mortality. The associations of eGFR and albuminuria with ESRD, however, did not differ by hypertensive status. Results for chronic kidney disease cohorts were similar to those for general and high-risk population cohorts. INTERPRETATION: Chronic kidney disease should be regarded as at least an equally relevant risk factor for mortality and ESRD in individuals without hypertension as it is in those with hypertension. FUNDING: US National Kidney Foundation.
    The Lancet 09/2012; · 39.06 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In conducting genome-wide association studies (GWAS), analytical approaches leveraging biological information may further understanding of the pathophysiology of clinical traits. To discover novel associations with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), a measure of kidney function, we developed a strategy for integrating prior biological knowledge into the existing GWAS data for eGFR from the CKDGen Consortium. Our strategy focuses on single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs) in genes that are connected by functional evidence, determined by literature mining and gene ontology (GO) hierarchies, to genes near previously validated eGFR associations. It then requires association thresholds consistent with multiple testing, and finally evaluates novel candidates by independent replication. Among the samples of European ancestry, we identified a genome-wide significant SNP in FBXL20 (P = 5.6 × 10(-9)) in meta-analysis of all available data, and additional SNPs at the INHBC, LRP2, PLEKHA1, SLC3A2 and SLC7A6 genes meeting multiple-testing corrected significance for replication and overall P-values of 4.5 × 10(-4)-2.2 × 10(-7). Neither the novel PLEKHA1 nor FBXL20 associations, both further supported by association with eGFR among African Americans and with transcript abundance, would have been implicated by eGFR candidate gene approaches. LRP2, encoding the megalin receptor, was identified through connection with the previously known eGFR gene DAB2 and extends understanding of the megalin system in kidney function. These findings highlight integration of existing genome-wide association data with independent biological knowledge to uncover novel candidate eGFR associations, including candidates lacking known connections to kidney-specific pathways. The strategy may also be applicable to other clinical phenotypes, although more testing will be needed to assess its potential for discovery in general.
    Human Molecular Genetics 09/2012; · 7.69 Impact Factor
  • Néphrologie & Thérapeutique. 09/2012; 8(5):284–285.
  • Néphrologie & Thérapeutique. 09/2012; 8(5):270.

Publication Stats

1k Citations
351.79 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2013
    • Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Nancy
      Nancy, Lorraine, France
  • 2012
    • Unité Inserm U1077
      Caen, Lower Normandy, France
  • 2011
    • University of Bristol
      Bristol, England, United Kingdom
  • 1998–2011
    • French Institute of Health and Medical Research
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
  • 2008
    • Université Paris-Sud 11
      Orsay, Île-de-France, France
  • 2007
    • INRS
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
    • Academisch Medisch Centrum Universiteit van Amsterdam
      • Department of Medical Informatics
      Amsterdam, North Holland, Netherlands