L J van 't Veer

Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdamo, North Holland, Netherlands

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Publications (102)740.97 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: In this study, we evaluated the diagnostic value of the Dutch Clinical Genetic Center (CGC) referral guidelines for BRCA1/2 mutation testing in 903 early breast cancer patients, unselected for family history, diagnosed in a cancer hospital before the age of 50 years in 1974-2002; most prevalent Dutch pathogenic BRCA1/2 mutations had been analyzed on coded DNA in a research setting. Forty-nine (5.4%) of the patients were proven to be BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. We found that 78% and 69% of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers identified met the criteria for referral to the CGC based on age, family history and synchronous multiple tumors; reflected by a combined sensitivity of 75.5% and specificity of 63.2%. More than half of the BRCA1 mutation carriers, that is, 58% had a triple-negative tumor. The highest AUC was obtained by shifting the age at diagnosis threshold criterion from 40 to 35 years and by adding a 'triple-negative breast cancer' criterion with an age threshold of 45 years; the specificity increased to 71.2%, whereas the sensitivity remained the same; that is, a referral of fewer patients will lead to the identification of at least the same number of BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. Two-thirds of the BRCA1/2 mutation carriers identified in this research setting had been referred for counseling and testing. Our results indicate that, awaiting a possibly more extended mutation screening of all breast cancer patients, the triple-negative status of a breast cancer should be added to the CGC referral criteria.European Journal of Human Genetics advance online publication, 20 August 2014; doi:10.1038/ejhg.2014.161.
    European journal of human genetics: EJHG 08/2014; · 3.56 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We have previously shown that a tag single nucleotide polymorphism (rs10235235), which maps to the CYP3A locus (7q22.1), was associated with a reduction in premenopausal urinary estrone glucuronide levels and a modest reduction in risk of breast cancer in women age <=50 years.
    Breast cancer research: BCR 05/2014; 16(3):R51. · 5.87 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Breast cancer imaging phenotype is diverse and may relate to molecular alterations driving cancer behavior. We systematically reviewed and meta-analyzed relations between breast cancer imaging features and HER2 overexpression as a marker of breast cancer aggressiveness. MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched for mammography, breast ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and/or [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography studies through February 2013. Of 68 imaging features that could be pooled (85 papers, 23,255 cancers; random-effects meta-analysis), 11 significantly related to HER2 overexpression. Results based on ≥5 studies and robustness in subgroup analyses: presence of microcalcifications on mammography (pooled odds ratio (pOR) 3.14, 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.46-4.00) or ultrasound (mass-associated pOR 2.95, 95%CI: 2.34-3.71), branching or fine linear microcalcifications (pOR 2.11, 95%CI: 1.07-4.14) or extremely dense breasts on mammography (pOR 1.37, 95%CI: 1.07-1.76), and washout (pOR 1.57, 95%CI: 1.11-2.21) or fast initial kinetics (pOR 2.60, 95%CI: 1.43-4.73) on MRI. Maximum [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose standardized uptake value (SUVmax) was higher upon HER2 overexpression (pooled mean difference +0.76, 95%CI: 0.10-1.42). These results show that several imaging features relate to HER2 overexpression, lending credibility to the hypothesis that imaging phenotype reflects cancer behavior. This implies prognostic relevance, which is especially relevant as imaging is readily available during diagnostic work-up.
    Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers &amp Prevention 05/2014; · 4.56 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Cancer evolves by mutation, with somatic reactivation of retrotransposons being one such mutational process. Germline retrotransposition can cause processed pseudogenes, but whether this occurs somatically has not been evaluated. Here we screen sequencing data from 660 cancer samples for somatically acquired pseudogenes. We find 42 events in 17 samples, especially non-small cell lung cancer (5/27) and colorectal cancer (2/11). Genomic features mirror those of germline LINE element retrotranspositions, with frequent target-site duplications (67%), consensus TTTTAA sites at insertion points, inverted rearrangements (21%), 5 0 truncation (74%) and polyA tails (88%). Transcriptional consequences include expression of pseudogenes from UTRs or introns of target genes. In addition, a somatic pseudogene that integrated into the promoter and first exon of the tumour suppressor gene, MGA, abrogated expression from that allele. Thus, formation of processed pseudogenes represents a new class of mutation occurring during cancer development, with potentially diverse functional consequences depending on genomic context.
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    ABSTRACT: 10.1093/annonc/mdu026 High concordance of protein (by IHC), gene (by FISH; HER2 only), and microarray readout (by TargetPrint) of ER, PgR, and HER2: results from the EORTC 10041/BIG 03-04 MINDACT trial Background: To investigate the correlation of TargetPrint with local and central immunohistochemistry/fluorescence
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    ABSTRACT: Co-expression modules are groups of genes with highly correlated expression patterns. In cancer, differences in module activity potentially represent the heterogeneity of phenotypes important in carcinogenesis, progression, or treatment response. To find gene expression modules active in breast cancer subpopulations, we assembled 72 breast cancer-related gene expression datasets containing ∼5,700 samples altogether. Per dataset, we identified genes with bimodal expression and used mixture-model clustering to ultimately define 11 modules of genes that are consistently co-regulated across multiple datasets. Functionally, these modules reflected estrogen signaling, development/differentiation, immune signaling, histone modification, ERBB2 signaling, the extracellular matrix (ECM) and stroma, and cell proliferation. The Tcell/Bcell immune modules appeared tumor-extrinsic, with coherent expression in tumors but not cell lines; whereas most other modules, interferon and ECM included, appeared intrinsic. Only four of the eleven modules were represented in the PAM50 intrinsic subtype classifier and other well-established prognostic signatures; although the immune modules were highly correlated to previously published immune signatures. As expected, the proliferation module was highly associated with decreased recurrence-free survival (RFS). Interestingly, the immune modules appeared associated with RFS even after adjustment for receptor subtype and proliferation; and in a multivariate analysis, the combination of Tcell/Bcell immune module down-regulation and proliferation module upregulation strongly associated with decreased RFS. Immune modules are unusual in that their upregulation is associated with a good prognosis without chemotherapy and a good response to chemotherapy, suggesting the paradox of high immune patients who respond to chemotherapy but would do well without it. Other findings concern the ECM/stromal modules, which despite common themes were associated with different sites of metastasis, possibly relating to the "seed and soil" hypothesis of cancer dissemination. Overall, co-expression modules provide a high-level functional view of breast cancer that complements the "cancer hallmarks" and may form the basis for improved predictors and treatments.
    PLoS ONE 01/2014; 9(2):e88309. · 3.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Large population-based registry studies have shown that breast cancer prognosis is inherited. Here we analyse single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of genes implicated in human immunology and inflammation as candidates for prognostic markers of breast cancer survival involving 1,804 oestrogen receptor (ER)-negative patients treated with chemotherapy (279 events) from 14 European studies in a prior large-scale genotyping experiment, which is part of the Collaborative Oncological Gene-environment Study (COGS) initiative. We carry out replication using Asian COGS samples (n=522, 53 events) and the Prospective Study of Outcomes in Sporadic versus Hereditary breast cancer (POSH) study (n=315, 108 events). Rs4458204_A near CCL20 (2q36.3) is found to be associated with breast cancer-specific death at a genome-wide significant level (n=2,641, 440 events, combined allelic hazard ratio (HR)=1.81 (1.49-2.19); P for trend=1.90 × 10(-9)). Such survival-associated variants can represent ideal targets for tailored therapeutics, and may also enhance our current prognostic prediction capabilities.
    Nature Communications 01/2014; 5:4051. · 10.02 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: MammaPrint, a prognostic 70-gene profile for early-stage breast cancer, has been available for fresh tissue. Improvements in RNA processing have enabled microarray diagnostics for formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue. Here, we describe method optimization, validation, and performance of MammaPrint using analyte from FFPE tissue. Laboratory procedures for enabling the assay to be run on FFPE tissue were determined using 157 samples, and the assay was established using 125 matched FFPE and fresh tissues. Validation of MammaPrint-FFPE, compared with MammaPrint-fresh, was performed on an independent series of matched tissue from five hospitals (n = 211). Reproducibility, repeatability, and precision of the FFPE assay (n = 87) was established for duplicate analysis of the same tumor, interlaboratory performance, 20-day repeat experiments, and repeated analyses over 12 months. FFPE sample processing had a success rate of 97%. The MammaPrint assay using FFPE analyte demonstrated an overall equivalence of 91.5% (95% confidence interval, 86.9% to 94.5%) between the 211 independent matched FFPE and fresh tumor samples. Precision was 97.3%, and repeatability was 97.8%, with highly reproducible results between replicate samples of the same tumor and between two laboratories (concordance, 96%). Thus, with 580 tumor samples, MammaPrint was successfully translated to FFPE tissue. The assay has high precision and reproducibility, and FFPE results are substantially equivalent to results derived from fresh tissue.
    The Journal of molecular diagnostics: JMD 12/2013; · 3.48 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The 10q26 locus in the second intron of FGFR2 is the locus most strongly associated with estrogen-receptor-positive breast cancer in genome-wide association studies. We conducted fine-scale mapping in case-control studies genotyped with a custom chip (iCOGS), comprising 41 studies (n = 89,050) of European ancestry, 9 Asian ancestry studies (n = 13,983), and 2 African ancestry studies (n = 2,028) from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. We identified three statistically independent risk signals within the locus. Within risk signals 1 and 3, genetic analysis identified five and two variants, respectively, highly correlated with the most strongly associated SNPs. By using a combination of genetic fine mapping, data on DNase hypersensitivity, and electrophoretic mobility shift assays to study protein-DNA binding, we identified rs35054928, rs2981578, and rs45631563 as putative functional SNPs. Chromatin immunoprecipitation showed that FOXA1 preferentially bound to the risk-associated allele (C) of rs2981578 and was able to recruit ERα to this site in an allele-specific manner, whereas E2F1 preferentially bound the risk variant of rs35054928. The risk alleles were preferentially found in open chromatin and bound by Ser5 phosphorylated RNA polymerase II, suggesting that the risk alleles are associated with changes in transcription. Chromatin conformation capture demonstrated that the risk region was able to interact with the promoter of FGFR2, the likely target gene of this risk region. A role for FOXA1 in mediating breast cancer susceptibility at this locus is consistent with the finding that the FGFR2 risk locus primarily predisposes to estrogen-receptor-positive disease.
    The American Journal of Human Genetics 11/2013; · 11.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background: The analytical performance of multigene signatures depends on many parameters, including precision, repeatability, reproducibility and intratumor heterogeneity. Indicators such as sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value are typically used to define the clinical performance of a diagnostic test. Aim: Here we study these performance characteristics of the MammaPrint® (Agendia NV, Amsterdam, The Netherlands) 70-gene signature using the US FDA-recommended guidelines, as well as predetermined acceptance criteria. Results: The clinical and analytical performance characteristics show that MammaPrint is a robust, reproducible, precise test, with a maximum variation of 5% in multiple samplings of the same tissue. Conclusion: MammaPrint is a reliable indicator of distant metastasis in early- stage breast cancer patients of all ages and is well suited for personalized medical care.
    Personalized Medicine 11/2013; 10(8):801. · 1.51 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A handful of tumor-derived cell lines form the mainstay of cancer therapeutic development, yielding drugs with an impact typically measured as months to disease progression. To develop more effective breast cancer therapeutics and more readily understand their clinical impact, we constructed a functional metabolic portrait of 46 independently derived breast cell lines. Our analysis of glutamine uptake and dependence identified a subset of triple-negative samples that are glutamine auxotrophs. Ambient glutamine indirectly supports environmental cystine acquisition via the xCT antiporter, which is expressed on one-third of triple-negative tumors in vivo. xCT inhibition with the clinically approved anti-inflammatory sulfasalazine decreases tumor growth, revealing a therapeutic target in breast tumors of poorest prognosis and a lead compound for rapid, effective drug development.
    Cancer cell 10/2013; · 25.29 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: All cancers are caused by somatic mutations; however, understanding of the biological processes generating these mutations is limited. The catalogue of somatic mutations from a cancer genome bears the signatures of the mutational processes that have been operative. Here we analysed 4,938,362 mutations from 7,042 cancers and extracted more than 20 distinct mutational signatures. Some are present in many cancer types, notably a signature attributed to the APOBEC family of cytidine deaminases, whereas others are confined to a single cancer class. Certain signatures are associated with age of the patient at cancer diagnosis, known mutagenic exposures or defects in DNA maintenance, but many are of cryptic origin. In addition to these genome-wide mutational signatures, hypermutation localized to small genomic regions, ‘kataegis’, is found in many cancer types. The results reveal the diversity of mutational processes underlying the development of cancer, with potential implications for understanding of cancer aetiology, prevention and therapy.
    Nature 08/2013; 500(7463):415-421. · 38.60 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The term breast cancer covers many different conditions, whose clinical course ranges from indolent to aggressive. However, current practice in breast cancer prevention and care, and in breast cancer epidemiology, does not take into account the heterogeneity of the disease. A comprehensive understanding of the etiology and progression of different breast cancer subtypes would enable a more patient-centered approach to breast health care: assessing an individual’s risk of getting specific subtypes of the disease, providing risk-based screening and prevention recommendations, and, for those diagnosed with the disease, tailored treatment options based on risk and timing of progression and mortality. The Athena Breast Health Network is an initiative of the five University of California medical and cancer centers to prototype this approach and to enable the development of a rapid learning system—connecting risk and outcome information from a heterogeneous patient population in real time and using new knowledge from research to continuously improve the quality of care. The Network is based on integrating clinical and research processes to create a comprehensive approach to accelerating patient-centered breast health care. Since its inception in 2009, the Network has developed a multi-site, transdisciplinary collaboration that enables the learning system. The five-campus collaboration has implemented a shared informatics platform, standardized electronic patient intake questionnaires, and common biospecimen protocols, as well as new clinical programs and multi-center research projects. The Athena Breast Health Network can serve as a model of a rapid learning system that integrates epidemiologic, behavioral, and clinical research with clinical care improvements.
    Breast Cancer Research and Treatment 07/2013; 140(2). · 4.47 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The 70-gene signature (MammaPrint™) has been developed on retrospective series of breast cancer patients to predict the risk of breast cancer distant metastases. The microarRAy-prognoSTics-in-breast-cancER (RASTER) study was the first study designed to prospectively evaluate the performance of the 70-gene signature, which result was available for 427 patients (cT1-3N0M0). Adjuvant systemic treatment decisions were based on the Dutch CBO 2004 guidelines, the 70-gene signature, and doctors' and patients' preferences. Five-year distant-recurrence-free-interval (DRFI) probabilities were compared between subgroups based on the 70-gene signature and Adjuvant! Online (AOL) (10-year survival probability <90% was defined as high-risk). Median follow-up was 61.6 months. Fifteen percent (33/219) of 70-gene signature low-risk patients received adjuvant chemotherapy (ACT) versus 81% (169/208) of 70-gene signature high-risk patients. The 5-year DRFI probabilities for 70-gene signature low-risk (n=219) and high-risk (n=208) patients were 97·0% and 91·7%. The 5-year DRFI probabilities for AOL low-risk (n=132) and high-risk (n=295) patients were 96·7% and 93·4%. For 70-gene signature low-risk - AOL high-risk patients (n=124), of whom 76% (n=94) had not received ACT, 5-year DRFI was 98.4%. In the AOL high-risk group, 32% (94/295) less patients would be eligible to receive ACT if the 70-gene signature was used. In this prospective community-based observational study, the 5-year DRFI probabilities confirmed the additional prognostic value of the 70-gene signature to clinic-pathological risk estimations such as AOL. Omission of adjuvant chemotherapy as judged appropriate by doctors and patients and instigated by a low-risk 70-gene signature result, appeared not to compromise outcome.
    International Journal of Cancer 01/2013; · 6.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Recently, a locus on chromosome 6q22.33 (rs2180341) was reported to be associated with increased breast cancer risk in the Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) population, and this association was also observed in populations of non-AJ European ancestry. In the present study, we performed a large replication analysis of rs2180341 using data from 31,428 invasive breast cancer cases and 34,700 controls collected from 25 studies in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC). In addition, we evaluated whether rs2180341 modifies breast cancer risk in 3,361 BRCA1 and 2,020 BRCA2 carriers from 11 centers in the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA). Based on the BCAC data from women of European ancestry, we found evidence for a weak association with breast cancer risk for rs2180341 (per-allele odds ratio (OR) = 1.03, 95% CI 1.00–1.06, p = 0.023). There was evidence for heterogeneity in the ORs among studies (I2 = 49.3%; p =
    PLoS ONE 06/2012; 7(6). · 3.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Breast cancer patients with node positive disease can have an excellent outcome with tamoxifen only. It is unclear whether analysing both the 70-gene signature and hormone receptors provides superior prediction of outcome in tamoxifen-treated patients than either alone. METHODS: Three series were evaluated: 121 patients (81% node positive) received adjuvant tamoxifen, 151 patients did not receive tamoxifen (10% node positive) and 92 patients received tamoxifen for metastatic disease. The 70-gene signature was analysed using MammaPrint™. Oestrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) immunohistochemistry was evaluated following St. Gallen Consensus (Highly Endocrine Responsive: ER and PR ≥ 50%, Incompletely Endocrine Responsive: ER and/or PR low or either one absent). RESULTS: In patients treated with adjuvant tamoxifen, both the 70-gene signature (adjusted for Endocrine Response Categories HR 2.17, 95%CI 1.01-4.66) as well as the Endocrine Response Categories (adjusted for 70-gene signature HR 6.35, 95%CI 1.90-21.3) were associated with breast-cancer-specific-survival (BCSS). Also in patients treated with tamoxifen for metastatic disease, combined analysis of the 70-gene signature and ER/PR revealed additional value (multivariate Cox regression, p = 0.013). In patients who did not receive tamoxifen, only the 70-gene signature was associated with outcome. CONCLUSION: In the series analysed, the 70-gene signature was mainly a prognostic factor, while ER and PR levels were mainly associated with outcome after tamoxifen. Combination of these three factors may improve outcome prediction in tamoxifen-treated patients.
    Breast (Edinburgh, Scotland) 06/2012; · 2.09 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: All cancers carry somatic mutations in their genomes. A subset, known as driver mutations, confer clonal selective advantage on cancer cells and are causally implicated in oncogenesis, and the remainder are passenger mutations. The driver mutations and mutational processes operative in breast cancer have not yet been comprehensively explored. Here we examine the genomes of 100 tumours for somatic copy number changes and mutations in the coding exons of protein-coding genes. The number of somatic mutations varied markedly between individual tumours. We found strong correlations between mutation number, age at which cancer was diagnosed and cancer histological grade, and observed multiple mutational signatures, including one present in about ten per cent of tumours characterized by numerous mutations of cytosine at TpC dinucleotides. Driver mutations were identified in several new cancer genes including AKT2, ARID1B, CASP8, CDKN1B, MAP3K1, MAP3K13, NCOR1, SMARCD1 and TBX3. Among the 100 tumours, we found driver mutations in at least 40 cancer genes and 73 different combinations of mutated cancer genes. The results highlight the substantial genetic diversity underlying this common disease.
    Nature 06/2012; 486(7403):400-4. · 38.60 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: AM), 9 Gene Environment Interaction and Breast Cancer in Germany (GENICA): Dr. Margarete Fischer-Bosch-Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, Stuttgart, and University Tü bingen, Stuttgart and Tü bingen, Germany (HB, Christina Justenhoven); Molecular Genetics of Breast Cancer, Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Heidelberg, Germany (UH); Department of Internal Medicine, Evangelische Kliniken Bonn gGmbH, Johanniter Krankenhaus, Bonn, Germany (YDK,); Institute of Pathology, Medical Faculty of the University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany (Hans-Peter Fischer); Institute for Prevention and Occupational Medicine of the German Social Accident Insurance, Bochum, Germany (Thomas Brü ning, Beate Pesch, Volker Harth, Sylvia Rabstein), 10 Amsterdam Breast Cancer Study (ABCS): Netherlands Cancer Institute, Departments of Experimental Therapy, Epidemiology and Molecular Pathology, Amsterdam, The Netherlands (AB, MKS, LJVV, LMB), 11 British Breast Cancer Study (BBCS):
    PLoS ONE 06/2012; 6(7). · 3.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: PURPOSE Neoadjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer provides critical information about tumor response; how best to leverage this for predicting recurrence-free survival (RFS) is not established. The I-SPY 1 TRIAL (Investigation of Serial Studies to Predict Your Therapeutic Response With Imaging and Molecular Analysis) was a multicenter breast cancer study integrating clinical, imaging, and genomic data to evaluate pathologic response, RFS, and their relationship and predictability based on tumor biomarkers. PATIENTS AND METHODS Eligible patients had tumors ≥ 3 cm and received neoadjuvant chemotherapy. We determined associations between pathologic complete response (pCR; defined as the absence of invasive cancer in breast and nodes) and RFS, overall and within receptor subsets. Results In 221 evaluable patients (median tumor size, 6.0 cm; median age, 49 years; 91% classified as poor risk on the basis of the 70-gene prognosis profile), 41% were hormone receptor (HR) negative, and 31% were human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) positive. For 190 patients treated without neoadjuvant trastuzumab, pCR was highest for HR-negative/HER2-positive patients (45%) and lowest for HR-positive/HER2-negative patients (9%). Achieving pCR predicted favorable RFS. For 172 patients treated without trastuzumab, the hazard ratio for RFS of pCR versus no pCR was 0.29 (95% CI, 0.07 to 0.82). pCR was more predictive of RFS by multivariate analysis when subtype was taken into account, and point estimates of hazard ratios within the HR-positive/HER2-negative (hazard ratio, 0.00; 95% CI, 0.00 to 0.93), HR-negative/HER2-negative (hazard ratio, 0.25; 95% CI, 0.04 to 0.97), and HER2-positive (hazard ratio, 0.14; 95% CI, 0.01 to 1.0) subtypes are lower. Ki67 further improved the prediction of pCR within subsets. CONCLUSION In this biologically high-risk group, pCR differs by receptor subset. pCR is more highly predictive of RFS within every established receptor subset than overall, demonstrating that the extent of outcome advantage conferred by pCR is specific to tumor biology.
    Journal of Clinical Oncology 05/2012; 30(26):3242-9. · 18.04 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

7k Citations
740.97 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1995–2014
    • Netherlands Cancer Institute
      • • Division of Molecular Pathology
      • • Division of Experimental Therapy
      • • Department of Pathology
      • • Division of Molecular Carcinogenesis
      Amsterdamo, North Holland, Netherlands
  • 2013
    • University of Cambridge
      Cambridge, England, United Kingdom
  • 2009–2013
    • Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute
      • Cancer Genome Project
      Cambridge, England, United Kingdom
  • 2011
    • University of California, San Francisco
      San Francisco, California, United States
    • Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Oncológicas
      • Human Cancer Genetics Programme
      Madrid, Madrid, Spain
  • 2005
    • Delft University of Technology
      Delft, South Holland, Netherlands
  • 1992–1993
    • Massachusetts General Hospital
      Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • 1988–1993
    • Leiden University Medical Centre
      • Department of Clinical Oncology
      Leiden, South Holland, Netherlands
  • 1990–1992
    • Harvard Medical School
      Boston, Massachusetts, United States