Tess Zappia

Australian Catholic University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

Are you Tess Zappia?

Claim your profile

Publications (5)6.61 Total impact

  • Source
    [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background: Few studies have examined the issues faced by lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT)-parented families in relation to their access to and satisfaction with healthcare services for their children. It is thought that LGBT individuals have experienced negative interactions with the healthcare environment. Aims: To systematically review the literature investigating the experience of LGBT parents seeking health care for their children. Methods: A search of the following databases: Cochrane Library, CINAHL, Embase, Google Scholar, Medline, PsychInfo, Science Direct, Sociological Abstracts, Proquest, Scopus, and Web of Science was conducted. Using the PRISMA flow chart and processes of the United Kingdom Centre for Reviews and Dissemination, we selected and analysed relevant studies. Findings: Four studies that met the inclusion criteria were identified. Studies showed that while the experience of LGBT parents seeking health care was largely positive, strategies need to be implemented to improve the quality of healthcare services for LGBT families and ensure that their needs are met. Discussion: Although many LGBT parents have positive experiences of health care, some still experience discrimination and prejudice. Implications for practice: Specific educational interventions are needed to support LGBT parents seeking health care for their children. Conclusions: Further research is required to explore LGBT-parented families' experiences of healthcare services, and this should include children's experiences.
    Worldviews on Evidence-Based Nursing 05/2012; · 1.35 Impact Factor
  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To explore Australian lesbian mothers' experiences of becoming parents. Lesbians are becoming parents and, since legislative changes in Australia, their numbers are increasing. Prior to legislative changes, fertility and health services for women in Australia exclusively served the needs of the heterosexual community. Although lesbian experience of seeking health services has been studied in other contexts, little has been done to understand their experience of deciding, conceiving and birthing. Qualitative descriptive study. Seven interviews conducted with lesbian mothers in Australia. The following themes were identified: 'making the decision'; 'the search'; 'perseverance'; and 'problems of isolation'. Although legislation now affords lesbians access to reproductive technologies throughout most of Australia, their involvement with health professionals can result in homophobic interactions. One way to address the needs of lesbian families is to provide an environment where the disclosure of sexual identity is encouraged. Further larger scale research should identify changes to service provision required to address the inequalities between heterosexual and lesbian women and ensure health services are provided that are free from discrimination. Most health services have policies and procedures in place to prevent discrimination on all grounds, including sexual orientation. It is imperative that administrators and clinicians take steps to ensure that these guidelines are applied.
    Journal of Clinical Nursing 05/2012; 21(13-14):1878-85. · 1.32 Impact Factor
  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The aim of the study was to assess health professionals' knowledge, attitudes and beliefs regarding lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender parents accessing health care for their children. Lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender parents can be reluctant to reveal their sexual orientation to health professionals, and consequently, they may not receive adequate or timely provision of health care. Currently, there is little research in this area. Descriptive, comparative study of 86 health professionals using a cross-sectional survey design with a set of validated, anonymous questionnaires. Associations between variables were assessed using chi-squared tests of independence, and differences between groups were assessed using the Mann-Whitney U-test or the Kruskal-Wallis one-way analysis of variance test. Content analysis was used to examine responses to open-ended questions. Knowledge and attitude scores were significantly associated with race, religious beliefs, frequency of attendance at religious services and having a friend who is openly lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender. Information gained from this study will assist clinicians and hospital management to develop policies and practices that ensure lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender families receive equitable, high-quality and holistic health care. Properly implemented family-centred care is an ideal model to provide care for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender families. However, the benefits of family-centred care can only be realised fully if health professionals delivering that care are sensitive to the context, functions and constructs of all the families they encounter.
    Journal of Clinical Nursing 03/2012; 21(5-6):880-7. · 1.32 Impact Factor
  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To explore the experiences of lesbian, gay and transgender families accessing health care for their children. Although lesbian, gay and transgender families are becoming more common, little is known about their health-seeking experiences. These families may be fearful about disclosing their sexual orientation or gender identity to health professionals. As a result, lesbian, gay and transgender parents may not be receiving optimal care for their children. Descriptive qualitative study. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews with 11 lesbian, gay and transgender parents in Australia. Three themes were generated from the data: 'managing health care experiences', 'attitudes' and 'transforming bureaucracies'. Negative experiences included encountering homophobia or transphobia and being required to educate health professionals. Positive experiences occurred when both parents were acknowledged as having an equal say in their child's health care. Many health professionals lack the skill or knowledge to meet the needs of lesbian, gay and transgender families. Health services are required to ensure that all policies and procedures are inclusive of all family constellations and that staff receive relevant and up-to-date sensitivity training and create an environment that is respectful of all family groups. Adopting a philosophy of family centred care can enable health providers and health professionals to provide lesbian, gay and transgender families with inclusive non-discriminatory care.
    Journal of Clinical Nursing 01/2012; 21(7-8):1128-35. · 1.32 Impact Factor
  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Little research has been conducted to investigate students' attitudes, knowledge and beliefs regarding lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender parents seeking health care for their children. Descriptive, comparative study. Validated scales were used to assess students' attitudes, knowledge and beliefs and gay affirmative practice. Three open ended questions assessed beliefs regarding lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender parents accessing health care for their children. Nursing and medical students completed questionnaires about attitudes to homosexuality. Associations between variables were assessed using chi-square tests of independence, and differences between nursing and medical student groups were assessed using the Mann-Whitney U-test or the Kruskal-Wallis one-way analysis of variance test. Responses to the open ended questions were evaluated, coded and described. Knowledge and attitudes about homosexuality were significantly associated with students' race, political voting behaviour, religious beliefs and having a friend who is openly lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender. It is important to develop strategies to address the existence of prejudicial attitudes among student health professionals and prevent discriminatory practices towards lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender parents when seeking health care for their children. Educators can develop programs that provide students with knowledge and skills to ensure lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender families receive effective health care when they access services for their children.
    Journal of Clinical Nursing 10/2011; 21(7-8):938-45. · 1.32 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

4 Citations
41 Downloads
613 Views
6.61 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2012
    • Australian Catholic University
      • School of Nursing and Midwifery
      Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
  • 2011–2012
    • Curtin University Australia
      • School of Nursing and Midwifery
      Bentley, Western Australia, Australia