Ana Inés Ansaldo

Université de Montréal, Montréal, Quebec, Canada

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Publications (39)67.06 Total impact

  • Karine Marcotte, Ana Inés Ansaldo
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    ABSTRACT: This study aimed at investigating the neural basis of word learning as a function of age and word type. Ten young and ten elderly French-speaking participants were trained by means of a computerized Spanish word program. Both age groups reached a similar naming accuracy, but the elderly required significantly more time. Despite equivalent performance, distinct neural networks characterized the ceiling. While the young cohort showed subcortical activations, the elderly recruited the left inferior frontal gyrus, the left lingual gyrus and the precuneus. The learning trajectory of the elderly, the neuroimaging findings together with their performance on the Stroop suggest that the young adults relied on control processing areas whereas the elderly relied on episodic memory circuits, which may reflect resorting to better preserved cognitive resources. Finally, the recruitment of visual processing areas by the elderly may reflect the impact of the language training method used.
    Brain and Language 05/2014; 135C:9-19. · 3.39 Impact Factor
  • Karine Marcotte, Ana Inés Ansaldo
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    ABSTRACT: This study aimed at investigating the neural basis of word learning as a function of age and word type. Ten young and ten elderly French-speaking participants were trained by means of a computerized Spanish word program. Both age groups reached a similar naming accuracy, but the elderly required significantly more time. Despite equivalent performance, distinct neural networks characterized the ceiling. While the young cohort showed subcortical activations, the elderly recruited the left inferior frontal gyrus, the left lingual gyrus and the precuneus. The learning trajectory of the elderly, the neuroimaging findings together with their performance on the Stroop suggest that the young adults relied on control processing areas whereas the elderly relied on episodic memory circuits, which may reflect resorting to better preserved cognitive resources. Finally, the recruitment of visual processing areas by the elderly may reflect the impact of the language training method used.
    Brain and Language 01/2014; 135:9–19. · 3.39 Impact Factor
  • Carole Anglade, Alexander Thiel, Ana Inès Ansaldo
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract Objectives: To review the literature on the specific role of the right cerebral hemisphere during recovery from aphasia in order to address the lack of consensus among authors. To derive a theoretical model reconciling the controversial findings in the literature. Methods: Initial PubMed, MEDLINE (1946 to 5 May 2012) and PsycINFO (1806 to first week June 2012) searches on recovery mechanisms from aphasia, whether treatment-related or not, retrieved a total of 35 English language articles. Articles, cross-referenced in this initial set were also reviewed if they met the inclusion criteria, thus resulting in a total of 42 articles included in this review. Main outcomes: Recruitment of the right hemisphere during recovery from aphasia can be effective if it occurs during a critical time window post-stroke. The recruitment's effectiveness will depend on the lesion's location, extent and permanence. Preservation of core language processing areas will generate minimal right hemisphere recruitment and vice versa. Some experimental studies seem to suggest that the improvement linked to a particular hemisphere can be modulated by specific therapy methods. Conclusion: The specific conditions in which effective right recruitment takes place may have important implications for rehabilitation treatment. These findings could lead to improved recovery in people suffering from aphasia. However, more research with non-invasive brain stimulation is needed.
    Brain Injury 01/2014; 28(2):138-45. · 1.51 Impact Factor
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    Ana Inés Ansaldo, Ladan Ghazi Saidi
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    ABSTRACT: Globalization imposes a number of challenges to the field of behavioural neurology. Among them, bilingual aphasia has become more frequent in the last decades,. Hence, as contemporary society is characterized by a multilingual mode of communication, aphasiologists have increasingly focused on bilingual aphasia therapy, and more recently, on the identification of the most efficient procedures for triggering language recovery in bilinguals with aphasia. Most of these studies are designed within the frame of neuropsychological and neurofunctional perspectives, with the purpose of unveiling the cognitive, and neural substrates of bilingual aphasia, its therapy and its recovery. On important issue regards the language in which therapy is provided. Hence, therapy in both languages is often not available, and thus, researchers have focused on the transfer of therapy effects from the treated language to the untreated one. The purpose of this article is to discuss the literature on bilingual aphasia therapy, with a focus on cross-linguistic therapy effects from the language in which therapy provided to the untreated language. The literature discussed in this paper was collected from the following databases: Medline, ASHA, Cochrane, Aphasiology Archive, Evidence-Based Medicine Guidelines, NHS Evidence, PsycBite et Speechbite, with the key words bilingual, aphasia, cross-language, generalization, cognates, naming treatment, and transfer, fifteen articles (two systematic reviews and 13~case studies). All of these article provide details on pre and post therapy bilingual aphasia profiles. They concern the adult population with post-stroke aphasia and anomia, and they describe therapy procedures in sufficient detail to allow discussing a number of variables that can influence the presence or absence of cross-linguistic transfer of therapy effects, RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: A number of factors that play a role on CLT of therapy effects are identified and discussed. Specifically, the evidence suggests that the word type the degree of structural overlap between languages, the type of therapy approach, the pre-and post morbid language proficiency profiles and the status of the cognitive control circuit play a role in the potential for CLT of therapy effects from the treated to the untreated language.
    Behavioural neurology 09/2013; · 1.25 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Previous research on participants with aphasia has mainly been based on standard functional neuroimaging analysis. Recent studies have shown that functional connectivity analysis can detect compensatory activity, not revealed by standard analysis. Little is known, however, about the default-mode network in aphasia. In the current study, we studied changes in the default-mode network in subjects with aphasia who underwent semantic feature analysis therapy. We studied nine participants with chronic aphasia and compared them to 10 control participants. For the first time, we identified the default-mode network using spatial independent component analysis, in participants with aphasia. Intensive therapy improved integration in the posterior areas of the default-mode network concurrent with language improvement. Correlations between integration and improvement did not reach significance, but the trend suggests that pre-therapy integration of the default-mode network may predict therapy outcomes. Functional connectivity allows a better understanding of the impact of semantic feature analysis in aphasia.
    Brain and Language 12/2012; 124(1):45-55. · 3.39 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The goal of this paper is to discuss experimental design options available for establishing the effects of treatment in studies that aim to examine the neural mechanisms associated with treatment-induced language recovery in aphasia, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). We present both group and single-subject experimental or case-series design options for doing this and address advantages and disadvantages of each. We also discuss general components of and requirements for treatment research studies, including operational definitions of variables, criteria for defining behavioral change and treatment efficacy, and reliability of measurement. Important considerations that are unique to neuroimaging-based treatment research are addressed, pertaining to the relation between the selected treatment approach and anticipated changes in language processes/functions and how such changes are hypothesized to map onto the brain.
    NeuroImage 10/2012; · 6.25 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: There is evidence that the explicit lexical-semantic processing deficits which characterize aphasia may be observed in the absence of implicit semantic impairment. The aim of this article was to critically review the international literature on lexical-semantic processing in aphasia, as tested through the semantic priming paradigm. Specifically, this review focused on aphasia and lexical-semantic processing, the methodological strengths and weaknesses of the semantic paradigms used, and recent evidence from neuroimaging studies on lexical-semantic processing. Furthermore, evidence on dissociations between implicit and explicit lexical-semantic processing reported in the literature will be discussed and interpreted by referring to functional neuroimaging evidence from healthy populations. There is evidence that semantic priming effects can be found both in fluent and in non-fluent aphasias, and that these effects are related to an extensive network which includes the temporal lobe, the pre-frontal cortex, the left frontal gyrus, the left temporal gyrus and the cingulated cortex.
    Arquivos de neuro-psiquiatria 09/2012; 70(9):718-26. · 0.55 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Research on the neural substrate of aphasia recovery has consistently increased since the advent of functional neuroimaging. The evidence from therapy-induced aphasia recovery studies shows that better recovery results from the reactivation of left hemisphere function; still, the specific left hemisphere key areas that sign successful outcome with a specific therapy approach remain to be identified. Nine participants suffering from aphasia received brief and intensive therapy with Semantic Feature Analysis (SFA). Behavioural and neuroimaging data during overt picture naming were obtained prior to and after therapy. This paper reports on a group of participants having benefited from SFA, and two distinct patterns of improvement. Correlational analysis showed that differences in outcome were not related to lesion size, but were negatively correlated with damage to Broca's area (BA45). Moreover, a group analysis showed that therapy-induced recovery following SFA was characterized by (a) a significant correlation between improvement and activation in the left precentral gyrus (BA4/6) before therapy, and (b) the recruitment of the left inferior parietal lobule, an area known for its role in semantic integration, following therapy with SFA. Individual fMRI analyses showed that although adaptive brain plasticity appeared to operate differently in each patient, best responders to SFA therapy recruited less areas after training compared to participants having shown less recovery who showed a larger number of activated areas sustaining recovery. The results of the present study suggest that a significant activation of BA4/6 could indicate the use of SFA to achieve successful outcome. Also our results suggest that greater SFA improvement in chronic aphasia is associated with recruitment of areas in the left hemisphere.
    Neuropsychologia 04/2012; 50(8):1776-86. · 3.48 Impact Factor
  • Ana Inés Ansaldo, Karima Kahlaoui, Yves Joanette
    Brain and Language 03/2012; 121(2):77-8. · 3.39 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Semantic dementia (SD) is a neurodegenerative disease that occurs following the atrophy of the anterior temporal lobes (ATLs). It is characterised by the degradation of semantic knowledge and difficulties in reading exception words (surface dyslexia). This disease has highlighted the role of the ATLs in the process of exception word reading. However, imaging studies in healthy subjects have failed to detect activation of the ATLs during exception word reading. The aim of the present study was to test whether the functional brain regions that mediate exception word reading in normal readers overlap those brain regions atrophied in SD. In Study One, we map the brain regions of grey matter atrophy in AF, a patient with mild SD and surface dyslexia profile. In Study Two, we map the activation pattern associated with exception word compared to pseudoword reading in young, healthy participants using fMRI. The results revealed areas of significant activation in healthy subjects engaged in the exception word reading task in the left anterior middle temporal gyrus, in a region observed to be atrophic in the patient AF. These results reconcile neuropsychological and functional imaging data, revealing the critical role of the left ATL in exception word reading.
    NeuroImage 02/2012; 60(4):2000-7. · 6.25 Impact Factor
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    Aspects in multilingual aphasia, Edited by Martin Gitterman, Mira Goral, Lorraine K Obler, 02/2012: chapter Bilingual aphasia: neural plasticity and considerations for recovery: pages 16-35; Multilingual Matters., ISBN: 978-1-84769-754-7
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    ABSTRACT: The study of the neural basis of syntactic processing has greatly benefited from neuroimaging techniques. Research on syntactic processing in bilinguals has used a variety of techniques, including mainly functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and event-related potentials (ERP). This paper reports on a functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) study on syntactic processing in highly proficient young adult speakers of Portuguese (mother tongue) (L1) and French (second language) (L2). They made a syntactic judgment of visually presented sentences, which either did or did not contain noun-verb agreement violations. The results showed that syntactic processing in both languages resulted in significant activation in anterior frontal regions of the left hemisphere and in the temporal superior posterior areas of the right hemisphere, with a more prominent activation for L2 in some areas. These findings corroborate previously reported neuroimaging evidence, showing the suitability of fNIRS for the study of syntactic processing in the bilingual brain.
    Brain and Language 12/2011; 121(2):144-51. · 3.39 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Recent studies have reported enhanced performance on language tasks induced by non-invasive brain stimulation, i.e., repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), or transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), in patients with aphasia due to stroke or Alzheimer's disease (AD). The first part of this article reviews brain stimulation studies related to language recovery in aphasic patients. The second part reports results from a pilot study with three chronic stroke patients who had non-fluent aphasia, where real or placebo rTMS was immediately followed by 25 minutes of individualised speech therapy. Real rTMS consisted of high-frequency rTMS over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (BA 8/9) for 25 minutes. Each patient underwent a total of four weeks of intervention. P1 underwent four weeks of real rTMS (5 days/week) where individualised speech therapy was provided for 25 minutes immediately following each rTMS session. P2 and P3 each underwent two weeks of placebo rTMS, followed immediately by individualised speech therapy; then two weeks of real rTMS, followed immediately by individualised speech therapy. Assessments took place at 2, 4, 12, 24 and 48 weeks post-entry/baseline testing. Relative to entry/baseline testing, a significant improvement in object naming was observed at all testing times, from two weeks post-intervention in real rTMS plus speech therapy, or placebo rTMS plus speech therapy. Our findings suggest beneficial effects of targeted behavioural training in combination with brain stimulation in chronic aphasic patients. However, further work is required in order to verify whether optimal combination parameters (rTMS alone or speech therapy alone) and length of rTMS treatment may be found.
    Neuropsychological Rehabilitation 10/2011; 21(5):717-41. · 2.01 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Bilinguals must focus their attention to control competing languages. In bilingual aphasia, damage to the fronto-subcortical loop may lead to pathological language switching and mixing and the attrition of the more automatic language (usually L1). We present the case of JZ, a bilingual Basque-Spanish 53-year-old man who, after haematoma in the left basal ganglia, presented with executive deficits and aphasia, characterised by more impaired language processing in Basque, his L1. Assessment with the Bilingual Aphasia Test revealed impaired spontaneous and automatic speech production and speech rate in L1, as well as impaired L2-to-L1 sentence translation. Later observation led to the assessment of verbal and non-verbal executive control, which allowed JZ's impaired performance on language tasks to be related to executive dysfunction. In line with previous research, we report the significant attrition of L1 following damage to the left basal ganglia, reported for the first time in a Basque-Spanish bilingual. Implications for models of declarative and procedural memory are discussed.
    Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics 03/2011; 25(6-7):480-98. · 0.78 Impact Factor
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    Procedia - Social and Behavioral Sciences 01/2011; 23:169-170.
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    Procedia - Social and Behavioral Sciences 01/2011; 23:33-34.
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    Procedia - Social and Behavioral Sciences 01/2011; 23:10-11.
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    Ana Inés Ansaldo, Ladan Ghazi-Saidi
    Procedia - Social and Behavioral Sciences 01/2011; 23:12-13.
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    Procedia - Social and Behavioral Sciences 06/2010; 6:39–40.
  • Karine Marcotte, Ana Inés Ansaldo
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    ABSTRACT: This event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study reports on the impact of semantic feature analysis (SFA) therapy on the neural substrate sustaining the recovery from severe anomia in two patients: one participant was diagnosed with primary progressive aphasia (PPA) 2 years before this study; the other participant acquired aphasia 8 years before this study. The participant with PPA showed severe progressive nonfluent aphasia (PNFA), the language profile being similar to a Broca's aphasia; the stroke patient presented with Broca's aphasia and a severe apraxia of speech (AOS). To examine the neural substrate allowing for recovery, both patients received brief and intensive therapy with SFA; behavioral and event-related (ER)-fMRI measures during oral picture naming were obtained pre- and post-therapy. Both patients benefitted from SFA to improve their naming performance. Functional MRI performances on trained and correct pretraining items were contrasted. Adaptive brain plasticity appeared to operate differently in each patient, despite the similarity of naming recovery profiles.
    Seminars in Speech and Language 02/2010; 31(1):52-63.

Publication Stats

137 Citations
67.06 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1999–2014
    • Université de Montréal
      • • Institute of Geriatrics of Montreal
      • • Faculty of Medicine
      • • Center for Mathematical Research
      Montréal, Quebec, Canada
  • 2012
    • Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul
      • Instituto de Psicologia
      Porto Alegre, Estado do Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil
  • 2010–2012
    • Centre jeunesse de Montréal-Institut universitaire
      Montréal, Quebec, Canada
  • 2008
    • Université du Québec à Montréal
      Montréal, Quebec, Canada