Yongxiang Li

Donghua University, Shanghai, Shanghai Shi, China

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Publications (3)19.3 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Comprehensive discovery of genetic mechanisms of drug resistance and identification of in vivo drug targets represent significant challenges. Here we present a functional variomics technology in the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This tool analyzes numerous genetic variants and effectively tackles both problems simultaneously. Using this tool, we discovered almost all genes that, due to mutations or modest overexpression, confer resistance to rapamycin, cycloheximide, and amphotericin B. Most significant among the resistance genes were drug targets, including multiple targets of a given drug. With amphotericin B, we discovered the highly conserved membrane protein Pmp3 as a potent resistance factor and a possible target. Widespread application of this tool should allow rapid identification of conserved resistance mechanisms and targets of many more compounds. New genes and alleles that confer resistance to other stresses can also be discovered. Similar tools in other systems, such as human cell lines, will also be useful.
    Cell Reports 02/2013; 3(2):577-85. · 7.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Chloroquine (CQ) and other quinoline-containing antimalarials are important drugs with many therapeutic benefits as well as adverse effects. However, the molecular targets underlying most such effects are largely unknown. By taking a novel functional genomics strategy, which employs a unique combination of genome-wide drug-gene synthetic lethality (DGSL), gene-gene synthetic lethality (GGSL), and dosage suppression (DS) screens in the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae and is thus termed SL/DS for simplicity, we found that CQ inhibits the thiamine transporters Thi7, Nrt1, and Thi72 in yeast. We first discovered a thi3Δ mutant as hypersensitive to CQ using a genome-wide DGSL analysis. Using genome-wide GGSL and DS screens, we then found that a thi7Δ mutation confers severe growth defect in the thi3Δ mutant and that THI7 overexpression suppresses CQ-hypersensitivity of this mutant. We subsequently showed that CQ inhibits the functions of Thi7 and its homologues Nrt1 and Thi72. In particular, the transporter activity of wild-type Thi7 but not a CQ-resistant mutant (Thi7(T287N)) was completely inhibited by the drug. Similar effects were also observed with other quinoline-containing antimalarials. In addition, CQ completely inhibited a human thiamine transporter (SLC19A3) expressed in yeast and significantly inhibited thiamine uptake in cultured human cell lines. Therefore, inhibition of thiamine uptake is a conserved mechanism of action of CQ. This study also demonstrated SL/DS as a uniquely effective methodology for discovering drug targets.
    PLoS Genetics 11/2012; 8(11):e1003083. · 8.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The azaoxoaporphine alkaloid sampangine exhibits strong antiproliferation activity in various organisms. Previous studies suggested that it somehow affects heme metabolism and stimulates production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In this study, we show that inhibition of heme biosynthesis is the primary mechanism of action by sampangine and that increases in the levels of reactive oxygen species are secondary to heme deficiency. We directly demonstrate that sampangine inhibits heme synthesis in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It also causes accumulation of uroporphyrinogen and its decarboxylated derivatives, intermediate products of the heme biosynthesis pathway. Our results also suggest that sampangine likely works through an unusual mechanism-by hyperactivating uroporhyrinogen III synthase-to inhibit heme biosynthesis. We also show that the inhibitory effect of sampangine on heme synthesis is conserved in human cells. This study also reveals a surprising essential role for the interaction between the mitochondrial ATP synthase and the electron transport chain.
    Eukaryotic Cell 09/2011; 10(11):1536-44. · 3.59 Impact Factor