Na Han

Sir Run Run Shaw Hospital, Hang-hsien, Zhejiang Sheng, China

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Publications (13)17.16 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Heterogeneity is one of the recognized characteristics of human tumors, and occurs on multiple levels in a wide range of tumors. A number of studies have focused on the heterogeneity found in primary tumors and related metastases with the consideration that the evaluation of metastatic rather than primary sites could be of clinical relevance. Numerous studies have demonstrated particularly high rates of heterogeneity between primary colorectal tumors and their paired lymphatic and hepatic metastases. It has also been proposed that the heterogeneity between primary colon carcinomas and their paired lymphatic and hepatic metastases may result in different responses to anticancer therapies. The heterogeneity in primary colon carcinoma and corresponding metastases by genome‑wide gene expression analysis has not been extensively studied. In the present study, we investigated the differentially expressed genes between a primary colon carcinoma specimen (obtained from a 40-year-old female colon carcinoma patient with lymphatic and hepatic metastases) and its paired lymphatic and hepatic metastases by genome-wide gene expression analysis using GeneChip HGU133Plus2.0 expression arrays. Our results demonstrate that genome-wide gene expression varies between primary colon carcinoma and its paired lymphatic and hepatic metastases.
    Molecular Medicine Reports 08/2012; 6(5):1057-68. · 1.17 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: FP3 is an engineered protein which contains the extracellular domain 2 of VEGF receptor 1 (Flt-1) and extracellular domain 3 and 4 of VEGF receptor 2 (Flk-1, KDR) fused to the Fc portion of human immunoglobulin G 1. Previous studies demonstrated its antiangiogenic effects in vitro and in vivo, and its antitumor activity in vivo. In this study, patient-derived tumor tissue (PDTT) xenograft models of primary colon carcinoma and lymphatic and hepatic metastases were established for assessment of the antitumor activity of FP3 in combination with capecitabine. Xenografts were treated with FP3, capecitabine, alone or in combination. After tumor growth was confirmed, volume and microvessel density in tumors were evaluated. Levels of VEGF, and PCNA in the tumor were examined by immunohistonchamical staining, level of thymidine phosphorylase (TP) was examined by ELISA, and levels of related cell signaling pathways proteins expression were examined by western blotting. FP3 in combination with capecitabine showed significant antitumor activity in three xenograft models (primary colon carcinoma, lymphatic metastasis, and hepatic metastasis). The microvessel density in tumor tissues treated with FP3 in combination with capecitabine was lower than that of the control. Antitumor activity of FP3 in combination with capecitabine was significantly higher than that of each agent alone in three xenograft models (primary colon carcinoma, lymphatic metastasis, and hepatic metastasis). This study indicated that addition of FP3 to capecitabine significantly improved tumor growth inhibition in the PDTT xenograft models of primary colon carcinoma and lymphatic and hepatic metastases.
    Cancer biology & therapy 07/2012; 13(9):737-44. · 3.29 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Heterogeneity in primary tumors and related metastases may result in failure of antitumor therapies, particularly in targeted therapies for the treatment of cancer. In this study, patient-derived tumor tissue (PDTT) xenograft models of colon carcinoma with lymphatic and hepatic metastases were used to evaluate the response to EGFR- and VEGF-targeted therapies. Our results showed that primary colon carcinoma and its corresponding lymphatic and hepatic metastases have a different response rate to anti-EGFR (cetuximab) and anti-VEGF (bevacizumab) therapies. However, the underlying mechanism of these types of phenomenon is still unclear. To investigate whether such phenomena may result from the heterogeneity in primary colon carcinoma and related metastases, we compared the expression levels of cell signaling pathway proteins using immunohistochemical staining and western blotting, and the gene status of KRAS using pyrosequencing in the same primary colon carcinoma and its corresponding lymphatic and hepatic metastatic tissues which were used for establishing the PDTT xenograft models. Our results showed that the expression levels of EGFR, VEGF, Akt/pAkt, ERK/pERK, MAPK/pMAPK, and mTOR/pmTOR were different in primary colon carcinoma and matched lymphatic and hepatic metastases although the KRAS gene status in all cases was wild-type. Our results indicate that the heterogeneity in primary colon carcinoma and its corresponding lymphatic and hepatic metastases may result in differences in the response to dual-inhibition of EGFR and VEGF.
    International Journal of Oncology 05/2012; 41(2):583-8. · 2.66 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: FP3 (KH902/KH903) is a novel vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) blocker with antiangiogenic properties. Previous studies revealed that FP3, a humanized fusion protein that combines ligand binding elements from the extracellular domains of VEGF receptors 1 and 2 and the Fc portion of IgG1, has an inhibitory effect on the VEGF-mediated proliferation and migration of human umbilical vein endothelial cells, and VEGF-mediated vessel sprouting of rat aortic rings in vitro. Thus, FP3 was considered as a new promising agent in treating human choroidal neovascularization (CNV) caused by age-related macular degeneration (AMD). FP3 also has an antitumor effect in a non-small cell lung cancer cell line (A549) xenograft model in nude mice. However, little is known of the direct effects of FP3 on tumor vessels. In this study, we investigated the effects of FP3 on blood vessels in a patient-derived tumor tissue (PDTT) xenograft model of gastric carcinoma, using large tumors with established vasculature. Treatment with FP3 caused robust and early changes in endothelial cells and pericytes of vessels in the PDTT xenograft model. Vascular density decreased and vascular sprouting was suppressed by treatment with FP3. Pericytes did not degenerate to the same extent as endothelial cells, and those on surviving tumor vessels achieved a more normal phenotype. Our results revealed that FP3 has a direct and rapid antiangiogenic effect on tumor vessels, which was achieved mainly via regression of tumor vasculature, inhibition of new and recurrent vessel growth, and normalization of existing tumor vasculature.
    Oncology letters 05/2012; 3(5):1052-1058. · 0.24 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background/Aims: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) serves as a logical target for antiangiogenic cancer therapy. This study is to investigate the inhibitory effects of FP3, a novel VEGF blocker, on angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo as well as anti-tumor effects on a liver cancer xenograft model in vivo. Methodology: The inhibitory effects of FP3 on angiogenesis were assessed by using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in vitro and the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) in vivo. The inhibitory effect of FP3 on tumor growth in vivo were evaluated in a human liver cancer cell line Hep-3B xenograft model in nude mice with the methods of tumor growth regression assay. Results: In experiments with HUVECs, FP3 inhibited cell survival and tube formation. In CAM assay, FP3 suppressed MCF-7 human breast cancer cell-induced angiogenesis. In tumor growth regression assay, FP3 significantly blocked the growth of Hep-3B tumor cell in subcutaneous tumor xenograft model in nude mice. Conclusions: FP3 has excellent inhibitory effects on angiogenesis both in vitro and in vivo and antitumor effect on liver cancer xenograft model; therefore, it might be used as an effective antiangiogenic agent in treatment of liver cancer.
    Hepato-gastroenterology 04/2012; 59(120). · 0.77 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: FP3 is an engineered protein which contains the extracellular domain 2 of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor 1 (Flt-1) and the extracellular domain 3 and 4 of VEGF receptor 2 (Flk-1, KDR) fused to the Fc portion of human immunoglobulin G1. Previous studies have demonstrated its antiangiogenic effects in vitro and in vivo, and its antitumor activity in vivo. Cetuximab is a monoclonal antibody against epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor. Combined inhibition of VEGF and EGF signaling may act additively or synergistically. In this study, patient-derived tumor tissue (PDTT) xenograft models of primary colon carcinoma and lymphatic and hepatic metastases were established for assessment of the antitumor activity of FP3 in combination with cetuximab. Xenografts were treated with FP3 and cetuximab, alone or in combination. After tumor growth was confirmed, volume and microvessel density in tumors were evaluated. Levels of VEGF, EGFR and PCNA in the tumor were examined by immunohistochemical staining, and levels of related cell signaling pathway proteins were examined by western blotting. FP3 in combination with cetuximab showed significant antitumor activity in three xenograft models (primary colon carcinoma, lymphatic metastasis and hepatic metastasis). The microvessel density in tumor tissues treated with FP3 in combination with cetuximab was lower compared to that of the control. Antitumor activity of FP3 in combination with cetuximab was significantly higher than that of each agent alone in two xenograft models (colon carcinoma lymphatic metastasis and hepatic metastasis). This study indicated that addition of FP3 to cetuximab significantly improved tumor growth inhibition in the PDTT xenograft models of colon carcinoma lymphatic and hepatic metastases. Combination anti-VEGF (FP3) and anti-EGFR (cetuximab) therapies may represent a novel therapeutic strategy for the management of metastatic colon carcinoma.
    International Journal of Molecular Medicine 04/2012; 30(1):126-32. · 1.96 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background/Aims: Lack of appropriate tumor models that reliably predict response to anticancer agents remains a major deficiency in the clinical practice of personalized cancer therapy. The aim of our study was to establish a patient-derived tumor tissue (PDTT) xenograft model of gastric carcinoma for personalized cancer therapeutic regimen selection and testing of novel molecularly targeted agents. Methodology: Patient-derived tumor tissue of primary gastric carcinoma was used to create the xenograft model. After 11 weeks, xenografts were harvested for serial transplantation. H&E staining, immunohistochemical staining and Western blotting were used to determine biological stability of the xenograft during serial transplantation compared with the original tumor tissue. Drug sensitivities of the xenograft to bevacizumab (Avastin), FP3 and cetuximab were evaluated.
    Hepato-gastroenterology 07/2011; 58(110-111):1814-22. · 0.77 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The traditional view of the role of proteases in tumor growth, progression and metastasis has significantly changed. Apart from their contribution to cancer progression, it is evident that a subclass of proteases, such as thrombin, serves as signal molecules controlling cell functions through the protease-activated receptors (PARs). Among the four types of PAR (PAR1-4; cloned and named in order of their discovery), PAR1, PAR3 and PAR4 are activated by thrombin, unlike PAR2, which is activated by trypsin-like serine proteases. Thrombin has been proven to be a significant factor in both the behavior of cancer in its involvement in hemostasis and blood coagulation. Thrombin is a key supporter of various cellular effects relevant to tumor growth and metastasis, as well as a potent activator of angiogenesis, which is essential for the growth and development of all solid tumor types. This review presents an overview of the role of PAR-mediated thrombin in angiogenesis and cancer, focusing on the ability of PAR1- and PAR4-mediated thrombin to affect tumorigenesis and angiogenesis.
    Oncology letters 07/2011; 2(4):599-608. · 0.24 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To construct an inducible artificial microRNA expression vector targeting eIF3g gene and use it to inhibit the expression of eIF3g in K562 cells. The microRNA targeting human eIF3g was designed and obtained by PCR. After confirmed by sequencing, the microRNA was cloned into the pRevTRE2 plasmid. The Tet-off plasmids were transfected into K562 cells and selected for the stable tetracycline inducible K562/Tet-off transfectants. The pRevTRE2-eIF3g-miRNA plasmid was then transfected into stable K562/Tet-off transfectants and the expression of eIF3g was detected by Western blot. The microRNA targeting eIF3g was confirmed by sequencing. GFP fluorescence assay showed that the stable transfectants of Tet-off plasmids were under tetracycline control. Western blot results showed that the stable transfectants of pRevTRE2-eIF3g-microRNA inhibited eIF3g expression under the regulation of tetracycline. The tetracycline-inducible artificial microRNA expression vector targeting eIF3g gene has been successfully constructed and effectively inhibits eIF3g expression in K562 cells.
    Xi bao yu fen zi mian yi xue za zhi = Chinese journal of cellular and molecular immunology 02/2011; 27(2):135-8.
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    ABSTRACT: The lack of appropriate tumor models of primary tumors and corresponding metastases that can reliably predict for response to anticancer agents remains a major deficiency in the clinical practice of cancer therapy. It was the aim of our study to establish patient-derived tumor tissue (PDTT) xenograft models of colon carcinoma with lymphatic and hepatic metastases useful for testing of novel molecularly targeted agents. PDTT of primary colon carcinoma, lymphatic and hepatic metastases were used to create xenograft models. Hematoxylin and eosin staining, immunohistochemical staining, genome-wide gene expression analysis, pyrosequencing, qRT-PCR, and western blotting were used to determine the biological stability of the xenografts during serial transplantation compared with the original tumor tissues. Early passages of the PDTT xenograft models of primary colon carcinoma, lymphatic and hepatic metastases revealed a high degree of similarity with the original clinical tumor samples with regard to histology, immunohistochemistry, genes expression, and mutation status as well as mRNA expression. After we have ascertained that these xenografts models retained similar histopathological features and molecular signatures as the original tumors, drug sensitivities of the xenografts to a novel VEGF targeted agent, FP3 was evaluated. In this study, PDTT xenograft models of colon carcinoma with lymphatic and hepatic metastasis have been successfully established. They provide appropriate models for testing of novel molecularly targeted agents.
    PLoS ONE 01/2011; 6(12):e28384. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BackgroundVascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a critical promoter of blood vessel growth during embryonic development and neovascularisation in tumours. VEGF serves as a logical target for antiangiogenic cancer therapy because of its fundamental role in tumour angiogenesis. This study is to investigate the inhibitory effects of FP3, a novel VEGF blocker, on angiogenesis in vitro and tumour growth in vivo. MethodsThe inhibitory effects of FP3 on angiogenesis in vitro were evaluated by using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and rat aortic ring. The inhibitory effects of FP3 on tumour growth and angiogenesis in vivo were evaluated in a human non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell line A549 tumour xenograft model with the methods of tumour growth regression assay and immunohistochemical staining, respectively. ResultsIn experiments with HUVECs, FP3 inhibited cell proliferation and migration. In rat aortic ring assay, FP3 suppressed VEGF-induced vessel sprouting. In tumour growth regression assay, FP3 significantly blocked the growth of A549 tumour in the subcutaneous tumour xenograft model and dramatically decreased the vessel density of tumour. ConclusionsFP3 has excellent inhibitory effects on tumour angiogenesis both in vitro and in vivo, therefore it could be used as an effective antiangiogenic agent. KeywordsAngiogenesis–Antiangiogenic effect–Antitumour effect–FP3–Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)
    Clinical and Translational Oncology 01/2011; 13(12):878-884. · 1.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To construct artificial microRNA expression vector targeting PAR4 and suppress the expression of PAR4 in human colorectal cancer SW620 cells with the artificial microRNA. Artificial microRNA was designed and amplified by two rounds of PCR and cloned into pMD-19T vector. The sequence of the cloned artificial microRNA was verified by DNA sequencing. Eight tandemly-repeated artificial microRNAs were subcloned into mammalian expression vector pcDNA3.1(+) to make the artificial microRNA- expressing vector pcDNA3.1(+)-8xPAR4-microRNA. The vector was transfected into human colorectal cancer SW620 cells, and stable transfectants were selected by G418. The expression of PAR4 was examined by Western blot. DNA sequencing showed that the sequence of the cloned artificial microRNA targeting PAR4 was correct. Western blot result showed that the expression of PAR4 in SW620 cells stably transfected with pcDNA3.1(+)-8xPAR4-microRNA was markedly downregulated when compared to SW620 parental cells. Artificial microRNA expression vector targeting PAR4 is successfully constructed with significant suppression effect on PAR4 expression in SW620 cells. This provides the basis for future studies on the function of PAR4 and potential cancer gene therapy targeting PAR4.
    Xi bao yu fen zi mian yi xue za zhi = Chinese journal of cellular and molecular immunology 11/2010; 26(11):1105-7.
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    ABSTRACT: Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a minimally invasive surgical procedure which has widespread popularity in the treatment of hepatic and pancreatic cancers. Increased evidence indicates that RFA stimulates anti-tumor immunity, possibly through the induction heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) expression. HSP70 has the capacity to affect the immunogenicity of tumor cells, to chaperone antigenic peptides and deliver these into antigen presentation pathways within antigen-presenting cells, and to activate and regulate innate and adaptive immunity, which makes it useful in immunotherapeutic strategies for the treatment of cancers. An English-language literature search was conducted using MEDLINE (1991-2010) on anti-tumor immunity, heat shock protein 70, radiofrequency ablation, hepatic cancer, pancreatic cancer, and other related subjects. RFA has an increasing application in the surgical treatment of hepatic and pancreatic cancers. Increased evidence indicates that RFA can induce the expression of HSP70 which possesses properties that enable it to influence a variety of immunological processes. Tumor-derived HSP70 is regarded as a potent adjuvant facilitating presentation of tumor antigens and induction of anti-tumor immunity. This review addresses the potential association of RFA, HSP70, and anti-tumor immunity in treatment of hepatic and pancreatic cancers. To establish direct evidence of a potential association of RFA, HSP70, and anti-tumor immunity in hepatic and pancreatic cancers, further investigations should be conducted.
    Hepatobiliary & pancreatic diseases international: HBPD INT 08/2010; 9(4):361-5. · 1.26 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

32 Citations
17.16 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2011
    • Sir Run Run Shaw Hospital
      Hang-hsien, Zhejiang Sheng, China
    • Wenzhou Medical College
      Yung-chia, Zhejiang Sheng, China
    • Zhejiang Cancer Hospital
      Hang-hsien, Zhejiang Sheng, China
  • 2010–2011
    • Zhejiang University
      • School of Medicine
      Hangzhou, Zhejiang Sheng, China