Fernanda V Sidequersky

University of Milan, Milano, Lombardy, Italy

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Publications (11)10.65 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Purpose The purpose of this study was to assess the modifications in body center of mass (CoM), total mechanical work and walking characteristics during low-heeled and high-heeled gait performed in ecological conditions. Methods The 3D coordinates of 19 body landmarks were recorded by an optoelectronic motion analyzer in 13 women while walking overground at self-selected speed with either low-heeled or high-heeled shoes (minimum height, 70 mm). Using mean anthropometric data, the CoM was estimated, and its position evaluated during normalized gait cycles. Shoulders, pelvic and knee orientations were also assessed together with estimates of total mechanical work. Results High-heeled walking was performed with significantly lower horizontal speed (p < 0.05) but with the same cadence than low-heeled walking. During the whole gait cycle, the CoM (calculated from the malleolus landmarks) was 3 % lower during high-heeled walking (p < 0.05), had higher vertical displacements and vertical velocity modifications (p < 0.001), and it was significantly more anterior (p < 0.01). On average, walking with high heels at self-selected speed required a 16 % higher total mechanical work, but the difference was not significant. At heel strike with high heels, the shoulders were more inclined (p < 0.05), the support limb knee was significantly more flexed (p < 0.05), with a 12 % reduced total range of motion (p < 0.001), while the back limb knee was less flexed (p < 0.05). Conclusions Wearing high-heeled shoes significantly alters the normal displacement of human CoM; high-heeled gait exaggerated female walking characteristics with a more anterior CoM position, a wider vertical movement and a slower velocity.
    Sport Sciences for Health 08/2014; 10(2).
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    ABSTRACT: Facial paralysis is a severe pathological condition, negatively affecting patients' quality of life. The altered tone and mobility of the mimetic musculature provoke both functional and morphological deficits. In the present study, we longitudinally measured facial movements in 14 patients (21-69 years) affected by unilateral facial paralysis not lasting longer than 23 months. The patients were analyzed before and after surgical masseteric to facial nerve neurorrhaphy. Examinations were performed at least 3 months after they had clinically started to regain facial mimicry. The displacement of selected facial landmarks was measured using an optoelectronic three-dimensional motion analyzer during: maximum smile without clenching (pre- and postsurgery), maximum smile by clenching on their posterior teeth (only postsurgery), and spontaneous smile (recorded during the vision of a funny video in both examinations). Before facial surgery, in all smiles facial landmarks moved more in the healthy than in the paretic side; after surgery, the differences decreased for both reduction of the healthy-side motion, and increment of the paretic-side motion (motion ratio before 52%, after 87%, p < 0.05, Students' t-test). The ratio between the paretic and healthy-side total motion (asymmetry) did not modify for maximum and spontaneous smiles, but significantly increased for the maximum smiles made with teeth clenching (asymmetry before 32%, after 11%, p < 0.001). Spontaneous smiles were recorded only in a subset of patients, but their execution was modified by surgery, with more symmetrical movements of the rehabilitated-side landmarks (asymmetry before 33%, after 10%), and reduced motion of the healthy-side ones (motion ratio before 51%, after 83%). In conclusion, the significant asymmetry in the magnitude of facial movements that characterized the analyzed patients before surgery reduced after surgery, at least in those facial areas interested by the masseteric to facial nerve reanimation.
    Journal of plastic, reconstructive & aesthetic surgery : JPRAS. 06/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The objective of this study was to assess the accuracy of displacements of tracing landmarks in standardized facial movements. Forty healthy persons were evaluated in 2 different groups (20 men and 20 women, aged 18-30 years) with optoelectronic motion analyzer and surface laser scanning. The displacements of tracing landmarks in brow lift and smile were calculated, and the 2 methods (optoelectronic motion analyzer and surface laser scanning) were compared in healthy persons. Side-related differences were found in the tracing landmark (superciliare) during brow lift movements between both methods (the largest movements were found on the right side, P = 0.044), whereas in smile movements the tracing landmark cheilion did not show significant differences between the 2 sides.In both movements, the differences of the tracing landmark displacements between the 2 systems and sexes were on average less than 2 mm, without statistically significant differences (P > 0.05). In conclusion, normal young adult men and women had similar standardized facial movements. The 2 analyzed movements can be measured by both optical instruments with comparable results.
    The Journal of craniofacial surgery 01/2014; 25(1):e65-70. · 0.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Facial paralysis is a severe pathological condition, negatively affecting patients’ quality of life. The altered tone and mobility of the mimetic musculature provoke both functional and morphological deficits. In the present study, we longitudinally measured facial movements in 14 patients (21-69 years) affected by unilateral facial paralysis not lasting longer than 23 months. The patients were analyzed before and after surgical masseteric to facial nerve neurorrhaphy. Examinations were performed at least three months after they had clinically started to regain facial mimicry. The displacement of selected facial landmarks was measured using an optoelectronic three-dimensional motion analyzer during: maximum smile without clenching (pre- and post-surgery); maximum smile by clenching on their posterior teeth (only post-surgery); spontaneous smile (recorded during the vision of a funny video in both examinations). Before facial surgery, in all smiles facial landmarks moved more in the healthy than in the paretic side; after surgery, the differences decreased for both reduction of the healthy side motion, and increment of the paretic side motion (motion ratio before 52%, after 87%, p < 0.05, Students’ t). The ratio between the paretic and healthy side total motion (asymmetry) did not modify for maximum and spontaneous smiles, but significantly increased for the maximum smiles made with teeth clenching (asymmetry before 32%, after 11%, p < 0.001). Spontaneous smiles were recorded only in a subset of patients, but their execution was modified by surgery, with more symmetrical movements of the rehabilitated side landmarks (asymmetry before 33%, after 10%), and reduced motion of the healthy side ones (motion ratio before 51%, after 83%). In conclusion, the significant asymmetry in the magnitude of facial movements that characterized the analyzed patients before surgery reduced after surgery, at least in those facial areas interested by the masseteric to facial nerve reanimation.
    Journal of Plastic Reconstructive & Aesthetic Surgery 01/2014; · 1.44 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Walking is a natural activity that is almost always performed wearing some kind of shoes. Among the various kinds of shoes, high heeled shoes induce increased ankle plantar flexion, greater knee flexion, anterior pelvic tilt, and trunk extension (1). The modifications in the arrangement of body segments cause an altered position of the body centre of mass (CoM). In the current study, we quantitatively compared the 3D displacement of the CoM during flat-heeled and high-heeled gait. Eleven volunteer women (mean age, 24 ys) walked wearing either low-heel and high-heel shoes (minimum height, 70 mm). On each subject, the 3D coordinates of 14 body landmarks were recorded by an optoelectronic motion analyzer. The body was segmented in 10 independent masses: head, torso, 2 upper arms and 2 lower arms (upper body); 2 upper legs and 2 lower legs (lower body). Using mean anthropometric data, the whole body CoM was computed, as well as its superior (uCoM) and inferior (lCoM) components (2). The body CoM was evaluated during normalized stride cycles. High-heeled gait, compared to flat-heeled gait, had a significantly lower CoM at Right heel strike (p=0.024) and Left heel strike (p=0.030). The same findings were also observed for uCoM and lCoM. No significant differences were found at Right toe off. In addition, a significant forward displacement of the lCoM in high-heeled gait was observed at each of the three stages (R heel strike, p=0.017; L heel strike, p=0.034; R toe off, p=0.003). Similar results were found for the whole CoM (p=0.024, p=0.038, p=0.004). The uCoM in high-heeled gait, instead, was significantly more anterior than in flat-heeled gait only at R toe off (p=0.024). Our findings confirm that wearing high-heeled shoes significantly alters the normal displacement of both components of the human CoM.
    67 National Congress SIAI, Brescia; 09/2013
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    67th Meeting of the Italian Society of Anatomy and Histology, Brescia; 09/2013
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    ABSTRACT: Using an optoelectronic motion capture system, we quantitatively assessed the arrangement of body segments and the displacement of the horizontal projection of the center of mass (CM) in seven skaters performing off-ice back spins on a rotating device (spinner). The position of the CM at the beginning of the spins was not a determining factor, but its rapid stabilization towards the center of the spinner, together with the achievement of a stable arrangement of trunk and limbs, was crucial to get the dynamic equilibrium, necessary for a lasting performance. At full spinning, however, there was an indicative variety of individual body postures. A final deceleration, associable with the loss of body equilibrium, was detected in the last spin of most of skaters. In conclusion, the current investigation demonstrated that the off-ice execution of back spin, a critical movement of ice skating, can be measured in laboratory, thus providing quantitative information to both the skaters and the coaches. The analysis is not invasive, and it may be proposed also for longitudinal evaluations of skating and postural training.
    Journal of electromyography and kinesiology: official journal of the International Society of Electrophysiological Kinesiology 05/2013; · 2.00 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Mandibular kinematic and standardized surface electromyography (sEMG) characteristics of masticatory muscles of subjects with short lasting TMD of mild-moderate severity were examined. Volunteers were submitted to clinical examination and questionnaire of severity. Ten subjects with TMD (age 27.3years, SD 7.8) and 10 control subjects without TMD, matched by age, were selected. Mandibular movements were recorded during free maximum mouth opening and closing (O-C) and unilateral, left and right, gum chewing. sEMG of the masseter and temporal muscles was performed during maximum teeth clenching either on cotton rolls or in intercuspal position, and during gum chewing. sEMG indices were obtained. Subjects with TMD, relative to control subjects, had lower relative mandibular rotation at the end of mouth opening, larger mean number of intersection between interincisal O-C paths during mastication and smaller asymmetry between working and balancing side, with participation beyond the expected of the contralateral muscles (P<0.05, t-test). Overall, TMD subjects showed similarities with the control subjects in several kinematic parameters and the EMG indices of the static test, although some changes in the mastication were observed.
    Journal of electromyography and kinesiology: official journal of the International Society of Electrophysiological Kinesiology 03/2013; · 2.00 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The objective of the current study was to assess a low-cost, noninvasive facial morphometric digitizer to assist the practitioner in three-dimensional soft-tissue changes before and after oral rehabilitation. Twenty-two patients aged 45 to 82 years, all with edentulous maxilla and mandible, were assessed both before and after receiving their definitive complete implant-supported prostheses (each received 4-11 implants in each dental arch; full-arch fixed prostheses were made). The three-dimensional coordinates of 50 soft-tissue facial landmarks were collected with a noninvasive digitizer; labial and facial areas, volumes, angles, and distances were compared without and with the prostheses. Dental prostheses induced significant reductions in the nasolabial, mentolabial, and interlabial angles, with increased labial prominence (P < 0.05, Wilcoxon test). Lip vermilion area and volume significantly increased; significant increments were found in the vertical and anteroposterior labial dimensions. The presence of the dental prostheses significantly (P < 0.001) modified the three-dimensional positions of several soft-tissue facial landmarks. In conclusion, the current approach enabled quantitative evaluation of the final soft-tissue results of oral rehabilitation with implant-supported prostheses, without submitting the patients to invasive procedures. The method could assess the three-dimensional appearance of the facial soft tissues of the patient while planning the provisional prosthetic restoration, providing quantitative information to prepare the best definitive prosthesis.
    The Journal of craniofacial surgery 11/2012; · 0.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To quantify the effects of facial palsy reanimation, 14 patients aged 17-66 years were analysed. All patients had unilateral facial paralysis, and were candidates for surgical masseteric to facial nerve anastomosis. Two patient groups were measured: seven patients were waiting for surgery, the other seven patients had already been submitted to surgery, and had regained facial mimicry. Each patient performed three facial animations: brow raise; free smile; lip purse. These were recorded using an optoelectronic motion analyser. The three-dimensional coordinates of facial landmarks were obtained, their movements were computed, and asymmetry indices calculated (differential movements between the two hemi-faces: healthy and paretic/rehabilitated). Before surgery, mobility was larger in the healthy than in the paretic side; after surgery, the differences were reduced (brow raise and lip purse), or even reversed (smile). Before surgery, lip purse was performed with significant labial asymmetry (p=0.042; larger healthy side movement). After surgery, asymmetry indices reduced. Total labial asymmetry during smiling was significantly different from 0 before surgery (p=0.018, larger healthy side movement). After surgery, all asymmetry indices became non-significant. Before surgery the lateral displacements of all labial landmarks were towards the healthy side, while they normalized after surgery.
    Journal of cranio-maxillo-facial surgery: official publication of the European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery 08/2011; 40(5):473-9. · 1.25 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The determination of normal parameters is an important procedure in the evaluation of the stomatognathic system. We used the surface electromyography standardization protocol described by Ferrario et al. (J Oral Rehabil. 2000;27:33-40, 2006;33:341) to determine reference values of the electromyographic standardized indices for the assessment of muscular symmetry (left and right side, percentage overlapping coefficient, POC), potential lateral displacing components (unbalanced contractile activities of contralateral masseter and temporalis muscles, TC), relative activity (most prevalent pair of masticatory muscles, ATTIV) and total activity (integrated areas of the electromyographic potentials over time, IMPACT) in healthy Brazilian young adults, and the relevant data reproducibility. Electromyography of the right and left masseter and temporalis muscles was performed during maximum teeth clenching in 20 healthy subjects (10 women and 10 men, mean age 23 years, s.d. 3), free from periodontal problems, temporomandibular disorders, oro-facial myofunctional disorder, and with full permanent dentition (28 teeth at least). Data reproducibility was computed for 75% of the sample. The values obtained were POC Temporal (88.11 +/- 1.45%), POC masseter (87.11 +/- 1.60%), TC (8.79 +/- 1.20%), ATTIV (-0.33 +/- 9.65%) and IMPACT (110.40 +/- 23.69 microV/microV.s %). There were no statistical differences between test and retest values (P > 0.05). The Technical Errors of Measurement (TEM) for 50% of subjects assessed during the same session were 1.5, 1.39, 1.06, 3.83 and 10.04. For 25% of the subjects assessed after a 6-month interval, the TEM were 0.80, 1.03, 0.73, 12.70 and 19.10. For all indices, there was good reproducibility. These electromyographic indices could be used in the assessment of patients with stomatognathic dysfunction.
    Journal of Oral Rehabilitation 06/2009; 36(8):577-83. · 2.34 Impact Factor
  • Gait & Posture. 35:S33–S34.

Publication Stats

19 Citations
10.65 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2011–2014
    • University of Milan
      • • Department of Biomedical Sciences for Health
      • • Department of Human Morphology and Biomedical Sciences "Cittá Studi"
      Milano, Lombardy, Italy
  • 2013
    • University of São Paulo
      • Faculty of Medicine (FM)
      Ribeirão Preto, Estado de Sao Paulo, Brazil