S Coppola

INO - Istituto Nazionale di Ottica, Florens, Tuscany, Italy

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Publications (73)204.89 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Stable chains of carbon-based nanoparticles were formed directly in polymer matrixes through an electrode-free approach. Spontaneous surface charges were generated pyroelectrically onto functionalized ferroelectric crystals, enabling the formation of electric field gradients that triggered the dipole-dipole interactions responsible for the alignment of the particles, while embedded in the polymer solution. The phenomenon is similar to the dielectrophoretic alignment of carbon nanotubes reported in the literature. However, here the electric fields are generated spontaneously by a simple heat treatment that, simultaneously, aligns the particles and provides the energy necessary for curing the host polymer. The result is a polymer sheet reinforced with well-aligned chains of carbon-based particles, avoiding the invasive implementation of appropriate electrodes and circuits. Because polymers with anisotropic features are of great interest for enhancing the thermal and/or the electrical conductivity, the electrode-free nature of this technique would improve the scaling down and the versatility of those interconnections that find applications in many fields, such as electronics, sensors, and biomedicine. Theoretical simulations of the interactions between the particles and the charge templates were implemented and appear in good agreement with the experimental results. The chain formation was characterized by controlling different parameters, including surface charge configuration, particle concentration, and polymer viscosity, thus demonstrating the reliability of the technique. Moreover, micro-Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used for a thorough inspection of the assembled chains.
    Langmuir 12/2013; · 4.38 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In the present work, the pyro-electrohydrodynamic technique was used for the realization of tunable-size microlens arrays. Poly(methyl methacrylate) dissolved in different solvent mixtures was used as the polymeric material for the realization of the microstructures. By controlling the experimental parameters and in particular, the volume of the drop reservoir, graded-size square arrays of tens of microlenses with focal length in the range 1.5-3 mm were produced. Moreover, the optical quality and geometrical features were investigated by profilometric and interferometric analysis.
    Applied Optics 11/2013; 52(32):7699-705. · 1.69 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We present a laser-assisted system for dispensing liquid micro-droplets by near infrared illumination of a pyroelectric crystal functionalized with gold nanorods embedded into polyvinyl alcohol. The non-invasive near infrared source resonates with the plasmon oscillations of the gold nanorods, providing a controlled thermal stimulus able to generate the pyroelectric effect. The resulting electric field interacts electro-hydrodynamically with a liquid reservoir leading to precise drawing of micro-litre droplets. This laser-assisted electro-hydrodynamic technique may open the way to the development of more compact and non-invasive nano-dispensing devices. V C 2013 AIP Publishing LLC. [http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4825337] Lab-on-a-chip systems are of great interest in biotechno-logical and chemical applications, thanks to their possibility of producing the desired products faster and in greater yield and purity compared to conventional techniques. 1 Basically two main classes of microfluidic approaches have been developed during the last decades. The continuous flow microsystems 2 usually consist of a network of micrometre-sized channels, thus suffering from various drawbacks, including large dead volumes and obstruction of channels. Moreover, they make use of valves and pumps, which increases complexity, cost and fragility of the system. On the other hand, the so-called "digital microfluidics" (Ref. 3) con-fine the reactions into single droplets, even with high mono-dispersivity. 4 A significant advantage of droplet-based systems is that they are compatible with wall-free structures, so that the operations can conveniently performed on the sur-face of a planar substrate. Surface microfluidics are simpler to fabricate and assemble and, lacking fixed microchannels, they can be reconfigured more easily. A number of techni-ques have been proposed for the actuation of microfluidic droplets, including the use of thermocapillary effects, 5 elec-trochemical gradients, 6 photochemical effects, 7 and dielec-trophoresis. 8 More recently, the same authors developed an innovative platform for actuating microdroplets through pyroelectric activation of the dielectrophoresis, with addi-tional advantages in terms of versatility. 9,10 In this frame-work, precise and reliable droplet dispensers are highly desirable and different techniques have been presented in lit-erature. Some of these rely on fluid interface instabilities, 11 or on atomic force probes. 12 Other approaches involve elec-trohydrodynamic jetting through appropriate nozzles. 13 These electric field based methods provide droplets with rel-atively high resolution but require the arrangement of appro-priate electrodes and high voltage circuits and the fabrication of micrometric nozzles. Recently, the same authors have developed a pyro-electrohydrodynamic (P-EHD) approach for different applications, including liquid printing in the attolitre volume range, 14 fabrication of solid photonic micro-structures, 15 manipulation of dielectric micro-targets. 16 In those works, the electric field, responsible for the electrode-free and nozzle-free manipulation of liquids, polymers, and solids, was activated onto lithium niobate (LN) and lithium tantalate (LT) crystals by resistive sources (e.g., hot tip of a soldering iron) that were contact-dependent, or by CO 2 lasers that avoided contact thanks to the absorption of those crys-tals in the far infrared (IR) region but sacrificing the com-pactness and making difficult the beam alignment due to invisibility to the naked eye. Here, we propose a laser-assisted EHD (LA-EHD) tech-nique based on the successful combination of a near infrared (NIR) source with the plasmon resonance of gold nanorods (GNRs) patterned onto the surface of a LN crystal. This sys-tem exhibits additional advantages compared to the elec-trode-and nozzle-free pyro-EHD configuration developed previously by the same authors. 14 The stimulation of the pyro-EHD effect is performed optically by a compact laser source launched in fibre. Such fibre-based setup favours the integrability and makes the light addressing easier thanks to its visibility to the naked eye when the light hits the target. In this context, a portable system could be fabricated for bio-sensing applications where on site drawing of very little amounts of liquids is needed. More versatile dispensing modes (serial and multiple) are possible by simply modulat-ing the distance between fibre and crystal and therefore by lens-free manipulation of the beam expansion. Moreover, additional versatility and precision are provided here by the possibility of patterning the heat source onto the pyroelectric crystal. In fact, the thermal gradient is ensured by the effi-cient photothermal conversion of the GNRs during the plas-mon resonance induced by laser illumination, so that the pyroelectric effect can be generated with high precision and selectivity by near field excitation through an appropriately addressed small beam or alternatively by a largely expanded beam illuminating a pattern of GNRs. The selectivity offered by the patterning approach reduces the stress induced to the crystal and provides, at the same time, better control over the
    Applied Physics Letters 10/2013; 103(16). · 3.79 Impact Factor
  • The European Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics; 05/2013
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    ABSTRACT: The investigation of a method for fabricating microlenses by a nozzle-free inkjet printing approach is reported. The new method, based on a pyroelectrohydrodynamic mechanism, is also able to dispense viscous liquids and to draw liquid phase drops directly from the reservoir. Specifically, by dispensing optical grade polymer dissolved in different solvent mixtures, microlenses were printed with a pattern defined directly through this deposition method. The reliability of the microlenses and the tunability of their focal properties were demonstrated through profilometric and inteferometric analyses.
    Optics Letters 07/2012; 37(13):2460-2. · 3.39 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Here the pyroelectric functionality of a Lithium Niobate (LN) substrate is used for non-contact manipulation of liquids. In this work we introduced the use of a pyro-electrohydrodynamc (PEHD) dispenser for the manipulation of high viscous polymer materials leading to the fabrication of arrays of microlenses. The set-up used for the experiment is described and the fabricated microlenses are analyzed by means of the Digital Holography (DH) set-up in transmission mode and through profilometric analysis. PMMA based ink was employed for the realization of optical quality microsctructures whose geometrical properties and, hence, the focal lengths were controlled by modifying the printing configuration of the PEHD method. The profilometric results are in agreement with those calculated using the digital holography technique.
    Proc SPIE 01/2012; 8428.
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    ABSTRACT: The pyroelectric functionality of a Lithium Niobate (LN) substrate is used for non-contact manipulation of polymeric material. In this work we introduced a novel approach for fabricating a wide variety of soft solid-like microstructures, thus leading to a new concept in 3D lithography. A relatively easy to accomplish technique has been demonstrated for curing different transient stages of polymer fluids by rapid cross-linking of PDMS. The method is twofold innovative thanks to the electrode-less configuration and to the rapid formation of a wide variety of 3D solid-like structures by exploiting polymer instabilities. This new and unique technique is named "pyro-electrohydrodynamic (PEHD) lithography", meaning the generation of structures by using forces produced by electric fields generated by the pyroelectric effect. The fabrication of polymer wires, needles, pillars, cones, or microspheres is reported, and practical proofs of their use in photonics are presented.
    Proc SPIE 01/2012; 8428.
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    ABSTRACT: A digital holographic characterization of Bessel beams produced by polymeric microaxicons is reported. Both intensity and phase of the beam can be numerically reconstructed in whichever point starting from a single acquired hologram. Optical parameters such as the full width at half maximum, the focal length and the depth of focus of the axicon lens are experimentally measured. The Bessel beam exiting from the axicon, with a very large depth of focus with respect to that of a Gaussian beam, is successfully exploited for optical trapping of micrometric objects.
    Proc SPIE 01/2012; 8428.
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    ABSTRACT: The investigation of a method for fabricating microlenses by a nozzle-free inkjet printing approach is reported. The new method, based on a pyroelectrohydrodynamic mechanism, is also able to dispense viscous liquids and to draw liquid phase drops directly from the reservoir. Specifically, by dispensing optical grade polymer dissolved in dif-ferent solvent mixtures, microlenses were printed with a pattern defined directly through this deposition method. The reliability of the microlenses and the tunability of their focal properties were demonstrated through profilo-metric and inteferometric analyses. © 2012 Optical Society of America OCIS codes: 010.1080, 090.1995, 160.3730. Microlenses are key components for optical devices and are widely applied in several application fields, such as communications, three-dimensional (3D) displays, opti-cal data storage, and photodetectors, playing a fundamen-tal role in many optical systems. Numerous classes of microlenses exist, depending on the embedding technol-ogy and the specific applications. And now, microlenses with variable focusing have been obtained by actuation of liquid crystals or other liquids through electro-wetting, electrophoresis, or hydrodynamic pressure [1–4]. On the other hand, a large variety of fabrication processes have been developed for plastic/polymer-based micro-lenses [5,6], such as embossing [7], soft lithography [8], micromolding [9], photolithography [10], electron beam lithography [11], reactive ion etching [12], the laser as-sisted technique [6], and printing techniques [13–16]. In particular, these last techniques were advised as direct methods for high-quality and high-precision processes, making the fabrication less time consuming and more cost effective. The emerging application of these techni-ques in the micro-optical field was mainly promoted by the development of optical grade polymers with proper thermal and mechanical properties [17]. Among the differ-ent printing technologies, inkjet printing is attracting an increasing interest as a single-step process with wide versatility in the definition of patterns, employable sub-strates, and its capability for the rapid prototyping of optical structures [18]. The restrictions of this technology related to the ejection of high viscosity materials and the clogging troubles can be overcome by nozzlefree processes. Recently, a novel technique based on the pyroelectro-hydrodynamic (pyro-EHD) approach was proposed for dispensing liquids with high spatial resolution [19]. The main advantage of this approach consists in avoiding the nozzle because the liquid is drawn directly from the liquid reservoir (drops or layers). Being nozzlefree, it can be applied also for high viscosity liquids, greatly extending the fabrication capabilities of the conventional inkjet printing processes. A lithium niobate (LN) crystal wafer (z-cut, optically polished and 500 μm thick from Crystal Technology, Inc.) was thermally stimulated using the hot tip of a conventional soldering iron. According to the intrinsic properties of such crystals, a temperature gradient ΔT induces locally a pyroelectric effect. This temperature variation causes a modification in the polar-ization (ΔPs), which builds up an electric potential across the z surfaces. The subsequent electric field is able to exert a hydrodynamic pressure onto the reservoir liquid, leading to the formation of a bridge or a conical tip. It is possible to define a critical distance D between the two plates of the setup so that for distances d < D a stable liquid bridge can be formed, while for d > D, the dispensing process is activated [19]. In this study, we investigated the direct formation of microlenses by the spontaneous breakdown of an unstable polymer liquid bridge created through the pyro-EHD effect, as illu-strated in Fig. 1. The setup used for the experiment con-sists of a microscope glass slide, above which is placed the polymer drop reservoir, while a plate of LN crystal faces the base slide and drives the process. A computer controlled the translation of the target substrate, which is inserted between the facing plates and used to collect the microlenses produced in this nozzlefree process.
    Optics Letters 01/2012; 37:2460. · 3.39 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We present a quick, simple and accurate digital holographic characterization of the Bessel beams produced by polymeric microaxicons. This technique allows the numerical reconstruction of both intensity and phase of the beam at whichever point starting from a single acquired hologram. From these data, it is possible to go back to the axicon structure, and to gather information about their characteristics. In particular, the focal length and the depth of focus of the axicon lens are experimentally measured, and the full width at half maximum of the beam is obtained too. The depth of focus, very large for a Bessel beam with respect to a Gaussian one, is successfully exploited for optical trapping of micrometric objects.
    Measurement Science and Technology 01/2012; 23(6). · 1.44 Impact Factor
  • Optics and Photonics News 12/2011; 22(12):46-.
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    ABSTRACT: A novel and interesting approach of an electrode-less microfluidic platform used to dispense liquid nanodroplet and to grip and transport micro objects driven by pyroelectric effect is demonstrated.
    2011 Ieee Photonics Conference (Pho). 01/2011;
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    ABSTRACT: We present a new approach for fabricating single or array of polymer optical microresonators based on a electrohydrodymanic 3D lithographic process. Passive as well as active spherical microresonators which emebedd semiconductor Quantum dots are demonstrated.
    2011 Ieee Photonics Conference (Pho). 01/2011;
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    ABSTRACT: Optical trapping is accomplished by means of polymeric micro-axicons, a sort of conical lenses with great depth of focus. A survey of several applications will be given.
    01/2011;
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    ABSTRACT: We report on the application of polymeric micro-axicons for optical trapping. Bessel beams with great depth of focus generated by these structures are interferometrically characterized and used as optical tweezers in different situations.
    2011 Ieee Photonics Conference (Pho). 01/2011;
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    ABSTRACT: Nano- and pico-droplets have been extracted and dispensed from sessile drop or liquid film reservoirs through pyroelectric effect activated by a hot tip or an IR laser source on polar dielectric substrates. The manipulation of liquids in 2D and 3D was demonstrated without the need of high-voltage power supplies and/or circuits.
    01/2011;
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    ABSTRACT: Manipulating and dispensing liquids on the micrometre- and nanoscale is important in biotechnology and combinatorial chemistry, and also for patterning inorganic, organic and biological inks. Several methods for dispensing liquids exist, but many require complicated electrodes and high-voltage circuits. Here, we show a simple way to draw attolitre liquid droplets from one or multiple sessile drops or liquid film reservoirs using a pyroelectrohydrodynamic dispenser. Local pyroelectric forces, which are activated by scanning a hot tip or an infrared laser beam over a lithium niobate substrate, draw liquid droplets from the reservoir below the substrate, and deposit them on the underside of the lithium niobate substrate. The shooting direction is altered by moving the hot tip or laser to form various patterns at different angles and locations. Our system does not require electrodes, nozzles or circuits, and is expected to have many applications in biochemical assays and various transport and mixing processes.
    Nature Nanotechnology 06/2010; 5(6):429-35. · 31.17 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

849 Citations
204.89 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2012–2013
    • INO - Istituto Nazionale di Ottica
      Florens, Tuscany, Italy
    • ENEA
      Roma, Latium, Italy
    • National Research Council
      Roma, Latium, Italy
  • 1991–2013
    • University of Naples Federico II
      • Department of Agriculture
      Napoli, Campania, Italy
  • 2001
    • Università degli Studi della Basilicata
      Potenza, Basilicate, Italy