Jin-Ho Shin

Konkuk University, Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea

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Publications (11)5.11 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to estimate the shelf life of butter and cheese products, with shelf life being a guide used to determine the storage period of food before deterioration. Butter and cheese samples stored at and had a shelf life of 221 d, while those stored at and had a shelf life of 109 d. Quality changes, including total cell count, coliform counts, Listeria monocytogenes counts, acid value, moisture content, pH, acidity and overall sensory evaluation, were monitored. In order to pass the overall sensory evaluation, a quality score of 5 points on a 9-point scale was required. For other quality criteria, legal quality limits were established based on the "Process Criteria and Ingredient Standard of Livestock Products" by the Animal, Plant and Fisheries Quarantine and Inspection Agency (Republic of Korea). The nonlegal quality limit was estimated by regression analysis between non-quality criteria (y) and overall sensory evaluation (x). The shelf life was estimated based on the number of days that the product passed the quality limit of the quality criteria. The shelf life of samples stored at , , and was 21.94, 17.18, 6.10 and 0.58 mon, respectively, for butter and 10.81, 9.47, 4.64 and 0.20 mon, respectively, for cheese.
    Hangug chugsan sigpum haghoeji = Korean journal for food science of animal resources 01/2014; 34(2). · 0.25 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To investigate the effect of starter isolated from kimchi, we selected the most effective strain among the 121 strains examined and identified the strain as Leuconostoc mesenteroides LK93 through 16S rDNA sequencing. This strain exhibited resistance to acid and bile salts with good survival capacity and showed antimicrobial and antifungal activity. We investigated the effects of starter on kimchi fermentation. The kimchi was fermented at 25°C for 25 d. Furthermore, the LK93 strain was examined for its ability to inhibit the growth of film-forming yeast. It was determined that the LK93 strain could be a potential starter in kimchi.
    Food science and biotechnology 01/2013; · 0.70 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study evaluated the antioxidant activities of kimchi at different fermentation times: short-term fermented kimchi (SK; less than 7days) and over-ripened kimchi (OK; greater than 2 years). In conclusion, antioxidant activity of the OK was significantly higher than the SK. The results of this study suggested that there was an increase in the antioxidant activity of fermented kimchi during the fermentation and ripening processes.
    Journal of Bioscience and Bioengineering 07/2011; 112(4):356-9. · 1.74 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study was conducted to investigate the dietary effects of germinated and fermented (with Monascus pupureus) soybean screenings (GFS) on growth performance and meat quality in broiler chicken. A total of 750 1-day-old Ross Ross male broiler chicks were randomly allocated into five groups (five replications with 30 birds each) and fed experimental diets for 5 wks as follows: Group 1, negative-control (antibiotics-free diet); Group 2, positive-control (negative-control with 10 ppm of Avilamycin); Group 3, negative-control with 0.3% GFS; Group 4, negative-control with 0.5% GFS; Group 5, negative-control with 1% GFS. The final body weight of each group fed a diet containing 1% GFS was significantly higher than that of the negative-control group. The feed conversion ratios of all groups fed diets containing GFS and the positivecontrol group were significantly improved compared to the negative-control group during the whole period (p
    Hangug chugsan sigpum haghoeji = Korean journal for food science of animal resources 01/2010; 30(6). · 0.25 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Changing health awareness has had an important effect on the functional food industry and is creating greater market opportunities. Unfortunately, there is no statement on functional dairy products in the Processing of Livestock Products Act. As a result, there is confusion in the market and legal difficulties with regard to the advertising of functional dairy products. This study was carried out to improve the current standardization of functional dairy products by comparing the domestic Health/Functional Food Act with the Japanese Health Promotion Law, and by investigating scientific data and articles from various literature and the Internet. In Japan, the Ministry of Health, Labor, and Welfare (MHLW) officially presented the Food with Health Claims (FHC) system that consists of Food with Nutrient Function Claims (FNFC), and innovated Food for Specified Health Uses (FOSHU). In 2005, the FOSHU system was changed to include several new subsystems: Current, Standardized, Reduction of disease risk, and Qualified FOSHU. Finally, to manufacture FOSHU, scientific evidence pertaining to such products must be examined by MHLW. Since FNFC was allowed, only 12 vitamins, , and five minerals were approved, though without scientific evidence of efficacy. The Korean Health/Functional Food Act requires that health/functional foods (HFFs) be marketed in measured doses. There are two types of HFFs: generic and product-specific. There are 67 ingredients listed in the act for generic HFFs, and if an HFF has a new active ingredient, it is considered a product-specific HFF. Product-specific HFFs must be approved by the Korean Food and Drug Administration (KFDA). With the present standards, it is impossible to label and advertise functional dairy products with health/functional claims. Government agencies must cooperate to solve this problem, and standardization should be carried out by considering existing health/functional products and claims/indications from other countries.
    Hangug chugsan sigpum haghoeji = Korean journal for food science of animal resources 01/2009; 29(4). · 0.25 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study investigated the effects of fermented soybean (FS) on growth and meat quality in pigs. A total thirty-six pigs were divided into 2 groups (2 treatment18 pigs each) and fed the experimental diets for 4 wk as follows: control (FS free); and T1 (FS 1%). The pigs in T1 had a higher feed efficiency compared with pigs fed control diets. pH was also significantly higher in the T1 group (p
    Hangug chugsan sigpum haghoeji = Korean journal for food science of animal resources 01/2009; 29(3). · 0.25 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This paper describes the differentiation between native Korean cattle (Hanwoo) and Holsteins or imported cattle using the real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) by targeting the sequence of the melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) gene. A rapid and accurate method was developed to identify Hanwoo by genotyping the DNA extracted from 295 commercial beef samples (obtained from 5 provinces in South Korea) labeled as Hanwoo beef. The results of real-time PCR assays for the proportions of Hanwoo were 84, 85.7, 95, 91.4, and 90% in the areas of Seoul, Joongbu, Youngnam, Honam, and Chungcheong, respectively. Thus, the beef samples from 295 butcher shops, which asserted to only sell Hanwoo, showed that 259 of 295 samples were of the Hanwoo beef gene type (T-type) and 36 of 295 samples were Holsteins of imported dairy cattle gene types (C-type or C/T type). In conclusion, the proportion of Hanwoo beef was 87.8% and the proportion of Holstein or imported dairy cattle meat was 12.2% (C-type: 9.8%, C/T-type: 2.4%). Generally, most consumers can not differentiate imported meat from Hanwoo beef. Therefore, Hanwoo beef and imported dairy cattle meat that is sold in butcher shops should have mandatory identification by using MC1R genotyping based on real-time PCR.
    Hangug chugsan sigpum haghoeji = Korean journal for food science of animal resources 01/2009; 29(6). · 0.25 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The consumption of foods containing trans fatty acids (TFAs) is a matter of concern at present. According to many studies, trans fatty acids (TFAs) may cause illnesses such as the coronary heart disease, diabetes mellitus, large intestine cancer, and breast cancer. They can also raise low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and reduce high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol. TFAs can also inhibit the synthesis of phospholipids containing polyunsaturated fatty acids in arterial cells. As a consequence the Food and Drug Administration has deemed that saturated fatty acid, cholesterol and trans fatty acid levels be listed on food labels as of 2006. The Korea Food and Drug Administration also has required the listing of trans fatty acid content on food labels since 2007. The aim of this study was to determine the total lipid and trans fatty acid (TFA) contents in retort food, powdered milk, biscuit and pizza products. The number of samples examined were 2 retort food, 6 powdered milk, 7 biscuit and 3 pizza products. The extraction of total lipids in retort food and powdered milk followed the chloroform methanol method. The extraction of total lipids in biscuit and pizza was by the acid digestion method. All samples were analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) using a SP-2560 capillary column and a flame ionization detector. The TFA contents per 100g of sample were 1-2.8% (1.9%) in retort foods, 0.4-2.4% (1.37%) in powdered milk products, 0-2.9% (1.23%) in biscuits, and 2.8-3.45% (3.03%) in pizzas.
    Hangug chugsan sigpum haghoeji = Korean journal for food science of animal resources 01/2008; 28(2). · 0.25 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study was conducted to investigate the effects of germinated and fermented unmarketable soybean (GFS) on laying performance and egg quality in laying hens. A total of two hundred laying hens were divided into 5 groups (5 treatment 4 replication 10 birds each) and fed with the experimental diets for 8 wk as follows: control, GFS free; T1, GFS 0.15%; T2, GFS 0.3%; T3, GFS 1%; T4, GFS 2%. The laying performance, egg quality, blood profiles, cecal microbial population, isoflavone content in egg yolk were investigated. There were no significant differences laying performance, relative liver and spleen weights, egg yolk color, eggshell color among groups. Eggshell strength in groups fed with diets containing GFS increased, but not significantly. Eggshell thickness significantly increased in the GFS-supplemented group. No significant differences were observed in the blood profiles and intestinal microflora after supplementation. The decrease of Haugh unit during storage was alleviated by feeding of GFS (p
    Hangug chugsan sigpum haghoeji = Korean journal for food science of animal resources 01/2008; 28(5). · 0.25 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Small amounts of trans fatty acids exist naturally in beef and dairy foods. Also, they can be produced in the process of partial hydrogenation to manufacture shortning or margarine. They can provide a better palatability and shelf life. According to the recently studies, trans fatty acids can raise health risk such as heart diseases and coronary artery diseases. They can also increase low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and decrease high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol in the blood plasma, therefore increasing the risk of atherosclerosis and diabetes. The aim of this study was to determine total lipids and trans fatty acids (TFAs) content in processed foods and meat products. The analysis of trans fatty acids was performed in 28 samples of donuts, 18 samples of bakeries, 4 samples of frozen doughs, 2 samples of popcorns, and 4 samples of meat products (ham, sausage, nuget, and bacon). Total lipids in processed foods and meat products were extracted by chloroform-Methanol method and acid digestion, respectively. They were analyzed by gas chromatography using a SP-2560 column and flame ionization detector. The amounts of TFAs per 100 g of foods were 0-3.3% (0.74% on average) in donuts, 0.2-5.8% (1.18% on average) in bakeries, 0.2-6.3% (1.93% on average) in frozen doughs, and 0-5.8% in popcorns. Meat products such as ham, sausage, and nuget analyzed 0.1% of TFAs, respectively and trans fatty acids in bacon were not detected. As a result, the distribution of TFAs in processed foods was widely ranged from O% to 6.3% according to manufacturers and types of products, whereas the content of TFAs in meat products ranged from 0% to 0.1%.
    Hangug chugsan sigpum haghoeji = Korean journal for food science of animal resources 01/2007; 27(4). · 0.25 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This paper aimed to identify the lactic acid bacteria species involved in kimchi fermentation at different fermentation periods by using culture-independent 16S rRNA gene clone libraries, and develop polymerase chain reaction for the detection of lactic acid bacteria (LAB). We investigated 6 commercially produced kimchi samples, including kimchi at an initial stage of fermentation and kimchi that was fermented to an over-ripened stage. The results of our study show that the analysis with cultureindependent 16S rRNA gene clone libraries could successfully identify 134 clones, 11 species, including Weissella, Lactobacillus, Pediococcus, and Leuconostoc from the 6 commercial kimchi samples. Weisella koreensis and Lactobacillus brevis were the predominant LAB in the initial stage of kimchi fermentation at 4°C (pH 4.96–5.27 and acidity 0.81–0.88), and Leuconostoc gelidum and Lactobacillus sakei subsp. sakei may play an important role in kimchi fermentation at the over-ripened stage (pH 3.61–3.91 and acidity 1.70–1.79). Keywordskimchi-16S rRNA sequence analysis-lactic acid bacteria-polymerase chain reaction
    Food science and biotechnology 19(2):541-546. · 0.70 Impact Factor