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Publications (2)1.82 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Institutions in the education, research and industrial sectors in Ghana are quite few in comparison to the medical sector. Occupational exposure to radiation in the education, research and industrial sectors in Ghana have been analysed for a 10 y period between 2000 and 2009, by extracting dose data from the database of the Radiation Protection Institute, Ghana Atomic Energy Commission. Thirty-four institutions belonging to the three sectors were monitored out of which ∼65% were in the industrial sector. During the 10 y study period, monitored institutions ranged from 18 to 23 while the exposed workers ranged from 246 to 156 between 2000 and 2009. Annual collective doses received by all the exposed workers reduced by a factor of 2 between 2000 and 2009. This is seen as a reduction in annual collective doses in education/research and industrial sectors by ∼39 and ∼62%, respectively, for the 10 y period. Highest and least annual collective doses of 182.0 man mSv and 68.5 man mSv were all recorded in the industrial sector in 2000 and 2009, respectively. Annual average values for dose per institution and dose per exposed worker decreased by 49 and 42.9%, respectively, between 2000 and 2009. Average dose per exposed worker for the 10 y period was least in the industrial sector and highest in the education/research sector with values 0.6 and 3.7 mSv, respectively. The mean of the ratio of annual occupationally exposed worker (OEW) doses for the industrial sector to the annual OEW doses for the education/research sector was 0.67, a suggestion that radiation protection practices are better in the industrial sector than they are in the education/research sector. Range of institutional average effective doses within the education/research and industrial sectors were 0.059-6.029, and 0.110-2.945 mSv, respectively. An average dose per all three sectors of 11.87 mSv and an average dose per exposed worker of 1.12 mSv were realised for the entire study period. The entire study period had 187 instances in which exposed workers received individual annual doses >1 mSv, with exposed workers in the education/research sector primarily receiving most of this individual dose.
    Radiation Protection Dosimetry 10/2011; 150(3):350-8. · 0.91 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Occupational exposure to radiation in medical practice in Ghana has been analysed for a 10-y period between 2000 and 2009. Monitored dose data in the medical institution in Ghana from the Radiation Protection Institute's database were extracted and analysed in terms of three categories: diagnostic radiology, radiotherapy and nuclear medicine. One hundred and eighty medical facilities were monitored for the 10-y period, out of which ~98% were diagnostic radiology facilities. Only one nuclear medicine and two radiotherapy facilities have been operational in the country since 2000. During the 10-y study period, monitored medical facilities increased by 18.8%, while the exposed workers decreased by 23.0%. Average exposed worker per entire medical institution for the 10-y study period was 4.3. Annual collective dose received by all the exposed workers reduced by a factor of 4 between 2000 and 2009. This is seen as reduction in annual collective doses in diagnostic radiology, radiotherapy and nuclear medicine facilities by ~76, ~72 and ~55%, respectively, for the 10-y period. Highest annual collective dose of 601.2 man mSv was recorded in 2002 and the least of 142.6 man mSv was recorded in 2009. Annual average values for dose per institution and dose per exposed worker decreased by 79 and 67.6%, respectively between 2000 and 2009. Average dose per exposed worker for the 10-y period was least in radiotherapy and highest in diagnostic radiology with values 0.14 and 1.05 mSv, respectively. Nuclear medicine however recorded average dose per worker of 0.72 mSv. Correspondingly, range of average effective doses within the diagnostic radiology, radiotherapy and nuclear medicine facilities were 0.328-2.614, 0.383-0.728 and 0.448-0.695 mSv, respectively. Throughout the study period, an average dose per medical institution of 3 mSv and an average dose per exposed worker of 0.69 mSv were realised. Exposed workers in diagnostic radiology primarily received most of the individual annual doses >1 mSv. The entire study period had 705 instances in which exposed workers received individual annual doses >1 mSv. On thermoluminescent dosemeter (TLD) return rates, facilities in Volta and Eastern Regions recorded highest return rates of 94.3% each. Ashanti Region recorded the least TLD return rate with 76.7%.
    Radiation Protection Dosimetry 07/2011; 149(4):431-7. · 0.91 Impact Factor