Gecilmara Salviato Pileggi

University of São Paulo, San Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil

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Publications (5)18.35 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To elaborate recommendations to the vaccination of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in Brazil. METHOD: Literature review and opinion of expert members of the Brazilian Society of Rheumatology Committee of Rheumatoid Arthritis and of an invited pediatric rheumatologist. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: The following 12 recommendations were established: 1) Before starting disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs, the vaccine card should be reviewed and updated; 2) Vaccines against seasonal influenza and against H1N1 are indicated annually for patients with RA; 3) The pneumococcal vaccine should be indicated for all patients with RA; 4) The vaccine against varicella should be indicated for patients with RA and a negative or dubious history for that disease; 5) The HPV vaccine should be considered for adolescent and young females with RA; 6) The meningococcal vaccine is indicated for patients with RA only in the presence of asplenia or complement deficiency; 7) Asplenic adults with RA should be immunized against Haemophilus influenzae type B; 8) An additional BCG vaccine is not indicated for patients diagnosed with RA; 9) Hepatitis B vaccine is indicated for patients with RA who are negative for antibodies against HBsAg; the combined hepatitis A and B vaccine should be considered; 10) Patients with RA and at high risk for tetanus, who received rituximab in the preceding 24 weeks, should undergo passive immunization with tetanus immunoglobulin in case of exposure; 11) The YF vaccine is contraindicated to patients with RA on immunosuppressive drugs; 12) The above described recommendations should be reviewed over the course of RA.
    Revista Brasileira de Reumatologia 02/2013; 53(1):13-23. DOI:10.1590/S0482-50042013000100002 · 0.99 Impact Factor
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    Claiton Viegas Brenol, Gecilmara Salviato Pileggi
    Revista Brasileira de Reumatologia 02/2013; 53(1):2-3. DOI:10.1590/S0482-50042013000100001 · 0.99 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To analyze available evidence on vaccinations in paediatric patients with rheumatic and autoinflammatory diseases. This evidence formed the basis of the recently constructed European League against Rheumatism (EULAR) recommendations for vaccination of these patients. A systematic literature review in the MEDLINE and EMBASE databases was conducted using various terms for vaccinations, paediatric rheumatic and autoinflammatory diseases and immunosuppressive drugs. Only papers on paediatric patients (<18 years of age) were selected. A panel of 13 experts in the field graded methodological quality and extracted data using predefined criteria. 27 papers were available. No studies were found on autoinflammatory diseases. 14 studies considered live-attenuated vaccines. Evidence so far supports the safety and immunogenicity of non-live composite vaccines, although studies were underpowered to accurately assess safety. Live-attenuated vaccines did not cause disease flares or severe adverse events, not even in patients on methotrexate and low dose glucocorticosteroids. Seven patients on anti-TNFalpha therapy were described receiving the live-attenuated measles, mumps, rubella (n=5) or varicella (n=2) booster without severe adverse events. Data on safety and efficacy of vaccinations in paediatric patients with rheumatic diseases is reassuring, but too limited to draw definite conclusions. More research is needed on the safety and efficacy of especially live-attenuated vaccines in patients with rheumatic and autoinflammatory diseases using high dose immunosuppressive drugs.
    Autoimmunity reviews 08/2011; 11(2):112-22. DOI:10.1016/j.autrev.2011.08.010 · 7.10 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Evidence-based recommendations for vaccination of paediatric patients with rheumatic diseases (PaedRD) were developed by following the EULAR standardised procedures for guideline development. The EULAR task force consisted of (paediatric) rheumatologists/immunologists, one expert in vaccine evaluation, one expert in public health and infectious disease control, and one epidemiologist. A systematic literature review was conducted in MEDLINE, EMBASE, and abstracts of the EULAR and American College of Rheumatology meetings of 2008/9. The level of evidence and strength of recommendation were based on customary scoring systems. Delphi voting was applied to assess the level of agreement between task force members. 107 papers and eight abstracts were used. The majority of papers considered seasonal influenza (41) or pneumococcal (23) vaccination. 26 studies were performed specifically in paediatric patients, and the majority in adult rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus patients. Fifteen recommendations were developed with an overall agreement of 91.7%. More research is needed on the safety and immunogenicity of (live-attenuated) vaccination in PaedRD, particularly in those using biologicals, and the effect of vaccination on prevention of infections.
    Annals of the rheumatic diseases 08/2011; 70(10):1704-12. DOI:10.1136/ard.2011.150193 · 9.27 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the safety and immunogenicity of varicella vaccine (VV) in susceptible patients with juvenile rheumatic diseases receiving methotrexate and corticosteroids. Twenty-five patients with juvenile rheumatic diseases (ages 2-19 years) and 18 healthy children and adolescents (ages 3-18 years) received a single dose of VV. All 25 patients were receiving methotrexate; 13 were also receiving prednisone and 5 were also receiving other disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs. None of the vaccinated patients or controls had a previous history of varicella. Anti-varicella-zoster virus IgG antibody (anti-VZV-IgG) titers were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay immediately before, 4-6 weeks after, and 1 year after vaccination. The patients were monitored prospectively for adverse reactions related to the vaccine, exposure, and occurrence of varicella. Disease activity was assessed 3 months before and 3 months after VV. Twenty patients and all of the controls had negative preimmunization titers of VZV-IgG, and 5 patients had equivocal levels. Positive VZV-IgG titers were detected in 10 (50%) of 20 seronegative patients and 13 (72.2%) of 18 controls 4-6 weeks after VV (P = 0.2). One year after vaccination, 8 of 10 patients maintained positive VZV-IgG titers. No overt varicella episodes and no severe adverse reactions were observed during the followup period. No worsening of clinical parameters and no flares of juvenile rheumatic diseases or changes in doses of medications used were detected after vaccination. In fact, the number of active joints in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis was significantly lower after VV (P = 0.009). VV appears to be safe in patients with juvenile rheumatic diseases receiving methotrexate, as long as continuous prospective vigilance for side effects is performed.
    07/2010; 62(7):1034-9. DOI:10.1002/acr.20183