Akiko Moriyama

Shin Nippon Biomedical Laboratories, Ltd., Kagosima, Kagoshima, Japan

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Publications (5)2.78 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Germinal center/lymphoid follicle area ratio and CD3/CD20-positive area ratio were calculated for the spleen, submandibular and mesenteric lymph nodes, and Peyer's patches in cynomolgus monkeys treated orally with cyclosporin A (CsA), an immunosuppressant which blocks Ca(2+)/NFAT signaling. A difference in hypocellularity between lymphoid organs was observed after CsA administration in a dose-dependent manner. Regarding drug efficacy, the highest susceptibility to CsA tended to be shown in the Peyer's patches, and susceptibility then descended in the order of the spleen, mesenteric lymph nodes, and submandibular lymph nodes. It was shown in the present study that decreases in germinal center area and CD3-positive area were sensitive indicators of the efficacy of CsA for lymphoid organs and tissue in cynomolgus monkeys.
    Journal of Veterinary Medical Science 06/2012; · 0.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We investigated chronological changes in immunohistochemical phenotyping in the thymus and spleen in Crl:CD rats up to the age of about one year. In the thymus, T cells increased markedly from 3 to 4 weeks of age. Proliferating cells also increased markedly at these points. B cells tended towards an increase with age. In the spleen, white pulp increased until 9 weeks of age and remained fairly stable thereafter. In the periarteriolar lymphoid sheath and marginal zone, T cells gradually increased until 9 weeks of age and became almost flat thereafter. In the lymph follicle, T cells increased with age. B cells tended towards an increase with age in all areas of the spleen. It was concluded that development of the thymus was most marked from 3 to 4 weeks of age and that both the thymus and spleen had matured by 9 weeks of age.
    Journal of Toxicologic Pathology 03/2012; 25(1):55-61. · 0.34 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate morphologic alterations in the thyroid gland in the second generation in cynomolgus monkeys, pregnant dams were exposed to high doses of thiamazole. In Experiment A, dams received thiamazole intragastrically via a nasogastric catheter from gestation day (GD) 50 to GD 150 or on the day before delivery. Initially, the dose level was 20 mg/kg/day (10 mg/kg twice daily); however, the dose level was subsequently decreased to 5 mg/kg/day (2.5 mg/kg twice daily), since deteriorated general conditions were observed in two dams. Six out of seven neonates died on the day of birth. The cause of neonatal death was tracheal compression and suffocation from goiter. The transplacental exposure to thiamazole affected the fetal thyroid glands and induced goiter in all neonates. The surviving neonate was necropsied 767 days after discontinuation of thiamazole exposure and showed reversibility of the induced changes. In Experiment B, dams were intragastrically administered thiamazole at 5 mg/kg/day (2.5 mg/kg twice daily) for treatment periods from GDs 51 to 70, 71 to 90, 91 to 110, 111 to 130 and 131 to 150. All fetuses showed enlarged thyroid glands but were viable. Histopathologically, hypertrophy and/or hyperplastic appearance of the follicular epithelium of the thyroid gland was observed at the end of each treatment period. The most active appearance of the follicular epithelium, consisting of crowded pedunculated structure, was demonstrated at end of the treatment period from GD 131 to 150. This is the first report on the morphology of fetal and neonatal goiter in the cynomolgus monkey.
    Journal of Toxicologic Pathology 12/2011; 24(4):215-22. · 0.34 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To clarify the morphological characteristics of the cynomolgus monkey immune system, we analyzed quantitative data on their lymphoid organs. Spleens, major lymph nodes and Peyer's patches were sampled from cynomolgus monkeys, and the lymphoid follicle and germinal center areas and percentages of CD3- and CD20-positive areas were calculated. All the organs analyzed showed large interindividual variations in the sizes of lymphoid follicles and germinal centers. Lymphoid follicle in the spleen, submandibular lymph nodes and Peyer's patches showed no marked difference in size. Germinal center size in the mesenteric lymph nodes and Peyer's patches were significantly smaller than those in the spleen. Areas containing T cells were largest in the lymph nodes, while those containing B cells were largest in the spleen and Peyer's patches. The mean size of the splenic lymphoid follicle in cynomolgus monkeys is larger than that in rats and similar to that in humans. Based on the large individual variation and the characteristics of lymphoid organs, it is important to use cynomolgus monkeys in standard toxicity studies. Taking advantage of the characteristics of each species enables reliable evaluation of the immunologic system in standard toxicity studies.
    Journal of Veterinary Medical Science 07/2011; 73(11):1459-64. · 0.88 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Two cases of spontaneous focal hepatic hyperplasia were observed in young female cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis). Grossly, a single raised nodule was observed in the left hepatic lobe. Histopathologically, the nodule compressed surrounding normal tissue; however, the hepatic cords within the nodule continued to those in the nor mal area except in part. Extensive fibrosis and absence of a normal hepatic triad were observed in the nodule. Thin fibrous septa radiating from the dense central stellate scarring and distended vessels were apparent in one animal. Hepatocytes in the nodule lacked cellular atypia, showed frequent PAS-positive eosinophilic inclusions in the cytoplasm and showed higher positive ratios for PCNA. The present cases resembled focal nodular hyperplasia reported in humans and a chimpanzee.
    Journal of Toxicologic Pathology 06/2011; 24(2):125-9. · 0.34 Impact Factor