Betsy Sleath

University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte, North Carolina, United States

Are you Betsy Sleath?

Claim your profile

Publications (83)173.84 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We applied the ecologic model of communication in medical consultations to examine how patient, physician, and situational/contextual factors are associated with whether patients ask one or more questions about glaucoma and glaucoma medications during visits to ophthalmologists. Patients with glaucoma who were newly prescribed or already on glaucoma medications were recruited at six ophthalmology clinics. Patients' visits with their doctors were video-recorded and patients were interviewed after visits. Generalized estimating equations were used to analyze the data. Two hundred and seventy-nine patients participated. Patients asked one or more questions about glaucoma during 59% of visits and about glaucoma medications during 48% of visits. Patients who were newly prescribed glaucoma medications were significantly more likely to ask one or more questions about glaucoma and glaucoma medications. Whether providers asked patients if they had questions was not significantly associated with patient question-asking. Patients were significantly more likely to ask older providers questions about glaucoma medications and female providers questions about glaucoma. Eye care providers should encourage glaucoma patients to ask questions during their medical visits.
    Health communication. 07/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES To describe the content of discussions between general pediatric providers and children and their caregivers about the benefits of asthma-control medication; describe the extent to which these discussions occur; and examine factors that are associated with medication benefit discussions. DESIGN Cross-sectional secondary analysis of audiotaped medical visits. SETTING Five primary care pediatric clinics in North Carolina. PARTICIPANTS 35 pediatric providers and 248 children with persistent asthma and their caregivers. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Presence of discussion about benefits associated with asthma-control medications. RESULTS Providers discussed benefits associated with asthma-control medications during 56% of medical visits. Benefits were more likely to be discussed when the child was younger and when medication adherence was discussed during the visit. When providers discussed benefits of asthma-control medications, they were most likely to ask questions and make statements regarding symptom control/prevention. CONCLUSION General pediatric medical providers often do not discuss the benefits of asthma-control medications. Pharmacists could fill this information gap by counseling both children and their caregivers about benefits that a child with asthma can expect as a result of treatment.
    Journal of the American Pharmacists Association 05/2014; 54(3):251-7.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this preliminary study was to describe the extent to which providers used collaborative goal setting and individualized assessment with patients who were newly prescribed glaucoma medications. English-speaking glaucoma suspect patients from six ophthalmology clinics who were newly prescribed glaucoma medications had their medical visits videotaped and were interviewed after the visits. The videotapes were transcribed and coded to examine provider use of collaborative goal setting and individualized assessment. Fifty-one patients seeing 12 ophthalmologists participated. Providers gave patients glaucoma treatment options during 37% of the visits; only five providers gave patients treatment options Providers asked for patient treatment preferences in less than 20% of the visits; only two providers asked for patient treatment preferences. Providers were significantly more likely to ask African American patients for their preferences or ideas concerning treatment than non-African American patients (Pearson χ = 4.1, p = 0.04). Providers were also significantly more likely to ask African American patients about their confidence in using glaucoma medication regularly than non-African American patients (Pearson χ = 8.2, p = 0.004). Providers asked about patient views about glaucoma in less than 20% of the visits; five providers asked patients their views on glaucoma and its treatment. Providers were significantly more likely to ask African American patients about their views on glaucoma than non-African American patients (Pearson χ = 5.62, p = 0.02). Eye care providers often did not use collaborative goal setting or conduct individualized assessments of patient views on glaucoma when prescribing treatment for the first time.
    Optometry and vision science: official publication of the American Academy of Optometry 04/2014; · 1.53 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Care continuity is considered a critical characteristic of high-performing health systems. Few studies have examined the continuity of medication management of complex patients, who often have multiple providers and complex medication regimens. The purpose of this study was to characterize patient factors associated with having more prescribers and the association between number of prescribers and acute care utilization. A retrospective cohort study was conducted of 7,933 Veterans with one to four cardiometabolic conditions (diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia or congestive heart failure) and prescribed medications for these conditions in 2008. The association between number of cardiometabolic conditions and prescribers was modeled using Poisson regression. The number of cardiometabolic conditions and number of prescribers were modeled to predict probability of inpatient admission, probability of emergency room (ER) visits, and number of ER visits among ER users. Demographic characteristics, number of cardiometabolic medications and comorbidities were included as covariates in all models. Patients had more prescribers if they had more cardiometabolic conditions (p < 0.001). The adjusted odds of an ER visit increased with the number of prescribers (two prescribers, Odds Ratio (OR) = 1.16; three prescribers, OR = 1.21; 4+ prescribers, OR = 1.39), but not with the number of conditions. Among ER users, the number of ER visits was neither associated with the number of prescribers nor the number of conditions. The adjusted odds of an inpatient admission increased with the number of prescribers (two prescribers, OR = 1.27; three prescribers, OR = 1.30; 4+ prescribers, OR = 1.34), but not with the number of conditions. Having more prescribers was associated with greater healthcare utilization for complex patients, despite adjustment for the number of conditions and medications. The number of prescribers may be an appropriate target for reducing acute care utilization by complex patients.
    Journal of General Internal Medicine 01/2014; · 3.28 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Objective. The purpose of this study was to examine how patient, physician, and situational factors are associated with the extent to which providers educate patients about glaucoma and glaucoma medications, and which patient and provider characteristics are associated with whether providers educate patients about glaucoma and glaucoma medications. Methods. Patients with glaucoma who were newly prescribed or on glaucoma medications were recruited and a cross-sectional study was conducted at six ophthalmology clinics. Patients' visits were videotape recorded and patients were interviewed after visits. Generalized estimating equations were used to analyze the data. Results. Two hundred and seventy-nine patients participated. Providers were significantly more likely to educate patients about glaucoma and glaucoma medications if they were newly prescribed glaucoma medications. Providers were significantly less likely to educate African American patients about glaucoma. Providers were significantly less likely to educate patients of lower health literacy about glaucoma medications. Conclusion. Eye care providers did not always educate patients about glaucoma or glaucoma medications. Practice Implications. Providers should consider educating more patients about what glaucoma is and how it is treated so that glaucoma patients can better understand their disease. Even if a patient has already been educated once, it is important to reinforce what has been taught before.
    Journal of ophthalmology. 01/2014; 2014:238939.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Objective To examine the association between socio-cultural factors and patient-provider communication and related racial differences Methods Data analysis included 1854 men with prostate cancer from a population-based study. Participants completed an assessment of communication variables, physician trust, perceived racism, religious beliefs, traditional health beliefs, and health literacy. A multi-group structural equation modeling approach was used to address the research aims. Results Compared with African Americans, Caucasian Americans had significantly greater mean scores of interpersonal treatment (p < 01), prostate cancer communication (p < .001), and physician trust (p < .001), but lower mean scores of religious beliefs, traditional health beliefs, and perceived racism (all p values < .001). For both African and Caucasian Americans, better patient-provider communication was associated with more physician trust, less perceived racism, greater religious beliefs (all p-values<.01), and at least high school education (p<.05). Conclusion(s) Socio-cultural factors are associated with patient-provider communication among men with cancer. No evidence supported associations differed by race. Practice implication To facilitate patient-provider communication during prostate cancer care, providers need to be aware of patient education levels, engage in behaviors that enhance trust, treat patients equally, respect religious beliefs, and reduce the difficulty level of the information.
    Patient Education and Counseling 01/2014; · 2.60 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The objectives of the study were to examine provider-family communication about attention deficit disorder during pediatric asthma visits. Children with asthma, aged 8 through 16 and their parents were recruited at five pediatric practices. All medical visits were audio-taped. There were 296 asthmatic children enrolled into the study and 67 of them also had attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). ADHD communication elements suggested by national guidelines were discussed infrequently. Providers were more likely to discuss, educate, and ask one or more questions about ADHD medications if the visit was non-asthma related. Providers included child input into the ADHD treatment regimen during 3 % of visits and they included parent input during 4.5 % of visits. Only one child and three parents asked questions about ADHD. Providers may neglect essential aspects of good ADHD management and communication in children who have ADHD plus another chronic condition such as asthma. Providers should set appropriate treatment expectations, establish target symptoms, and encourage children and parents to ask questions so mutual decision-making can occur.
    Community Mental Health Journal 12/2013; · 1.03 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Objective. To examine how often providers discussed asthma action plans with children and their caregivers and child, clinical, and provider characteristics that were associated with those discussions. Method. This was a cross-sectional analysis of audio-recorded visits between 35 general pediatric providers and 260 children (8-16 years old) with asthma and their caregivers. The visits were transcribed into text. The transcripts were coded for discussions about written asthma action plans. Results. Providers discussed written asthma action plans with 21.0% of children and caregivers. Providers were significantly more likely to discuss asthma action plans when the child was enrolled in Medicaid, the visit was asthma related, the visit was longer, the provider was not White, or more provider education. Conclusion. In our sample, providers rarely discussed action plans with children and their caregivers. Providers should discuss asthma action plans with every child with persistent asthma and their caregivers and revise them regularly.
    Clinical Pediatrics 10/2013; · 1.27 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The objectives of this study were to: (1) describe the extent to which general pediatric providers discuss risks associated with asthma control medications with families, and (2) examine factors that are associated with risk discussions. This study was a cross-sectional secondary analysis of audio taped medical visits involving 35 pediatric providers and 248 children with asthma with their caregivers. Transcripts of the visits were coded for discussions about asthma medication risks. Generalized estimating equations were used to analyze the data. Providers discussed asthma control medication risks during 23% of visits. Risks were more likely to be discussed when the visit was longer and when the provider prescribed a new asthma control medication. When providers discussed asthma control medication risks, they were most likely to ask the family general questions and make general statements. Across all of the visits, caregivers asked a total of 16 questions and made a total of 20 statements about risks associated with asthma medications; children asked a total of 3 questions and made two statements about risks associated with asthma control medications. Providers discussed risks associated with asthma control medications in less than one-quarter of medical visits. Providers should involve families in discussions about risks associated with medications during every visit to assess potential barriers to medication adherence. Pediatr Pulmonol. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Pediatric Pulmonology 09/2013; · 2.38 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Abstract Objective: This study examined whether provider, caregiver, and child communication predicted peak flow meter (PFM) use one month later. Methods: Five practices, 35 providers, and 296 children with persistent asthma and their caregivers comprised the study sample. Audio-recorded provider-caregiver-child communication during the baseline medical visit captured discussion of the PFM; and child and caregiver baseline interviews after the medical visit collected factors associated with PFM use. Child- and caregiver-reported PFM availability and use, and observed child use of PFM were collected one-month later in the family's home. Results: During the medical visit, provider communication about PFM use was infrequent (10% maximum) and child- or caregiver-initiated communication was nearly absent (0-2%). Despite this, children demonstrated good use of the PFM one month later. Children were significantly more likely to perform at least six PFM steps correctly one month later when there was more communication about PFM during the medical visit. Few other factors predicted availability and use. Conclusions: Few providers discussed use of a PFM; observed performance was predicted by having talked about it with the child's provider. Provider communication should be targeted in future interventions to improve asthma management skills.
    Journal of Asthma 09/2013; · 1.85 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Our objectives were to examine whether providers engage children with asthma in treatment-related discussions at the level children prefer (engagement concordance) and to determine whether engagement concordance is related to child, caregiver, and provider characteristics. Children with asthma (n = 296) aged 8-16 years were recruited at five pediatric practices in North Carolina. Using audiotaped medical visit transcripts, we documented the number of treatment-related questions the providers asked the children. Children reported their preferred level of provider engagement. A logistic generalized estimating equation was used to determine which variables predicted engagement concordance. Most children (96.6%) wanted to be involved in treatment-related discussions. One-third of the providers did not ask children any treatment-related questions. Only 36.1% of provider-child dyads were concordant. Most discordant dyads were under-engaged (83.1%). Better engagement concordance was observed among older children (odds ratio (OR) = 1.19, 95% confidence interval (CI) (1.07, 1.33)), male children (OR = 1.67, 95% CI (1.03, 2.70)), and among providers with fewer years in practice (OR = .97, 95% CI (.94, .99)). Providers engaged in treatment-related discussions with younger children and females less frequently than these children preferred. Providers should ask children how much they want to be involved in treatment-related discussions and then attempt to engage children at the level they prefer.
    Journal of Child Health Care 06/2013; · 0.77 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Abstract Objective: This study examined whether patient-provider communication is associated with asthma-related quality of life (QOL) and asthma outcomes among children with asthma and their caregivers. Methods: Children ages 8-16 with asthma and their caregivers (n=296) were recruited at five pediatric practices in North Carolina. Children and caregivers reported demographic and clinical characteristics immediately after an audiotaped medical visit with their health care provider. During a home visit that took place one month after the medical visit, children and caregivers reported asthma-related QOL, and caregivers reported child asthma outcomes, including asthma symptom days and missed school days. Generalized estimating equations were used to determine whether patient-provider communication during the medical visit was associated with child and caregiver QOL and child asthma outcomes one month later. Results: On average, providers asked caregivers 4.5 questions and children 3 questions per visit, whereas caregivers and children asked less than one question per visit. Providers asked children more asthma-related questions, caregivers reported better QOL and fewer asthma symptom days one month later. Children and caregivers with higher asthma-management self-efficacy at the office visit reported better quality of life one month later. Conclusions: Mirroring national guideline recommendations, our results suggest that providers should ask children about their asthma during medical visits. Future longitudinal studies should conduct mediation analyses to determine whether asking children asthma-related questions during medical visits increases children's asthma management self-efficacy and ultimately improve outcomes, such as quality of life, health care utilization, symptom days, and missed school days.
    Journal of Asthma 06/2013; · 1.85 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: The objectives of the study were to describe the extent to which lay caregivers and children who reported asthma medication problems asked medication questions during their medical visits. METHODS: Children with asthma ages 8 through 16 years and their caregivers were recruited at five paediatric practices and their medical visits were audiotape recorded. Children were interviewed after their medical visits and caregivers completed questionnaires. A home visit was conducted 1 month later. Generalized estimating equations were used to analyse the data. KEY FINDINGS: Two hundred and ninety six families participated. Among those caregivers who reported asthma medication problems, only 35% had asked at least one medication question during the visit. Among children who reported asthma medication problems, only 11% had asked at least one medication question during their consultation. Caregivers and children who reported a problem with their asthma medications were significantly more likely to have asked medication questions if providers had asked more questions about control medications. Children who reported higher asthma management self-efficacy were significantly more likely to have asked an asthma medication question. CONCLUSIONS: Only one in three caregivers and one in 10 children who reported an asthma medication problem asked a question during their medical visits and many still reported these problems 1 month later. Pharmacists should encourage caregivers and children to report problems they may be having using their asthma medications.
    The International journal of pharmacy practice. 05/2013;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To examine the multidimensional concept of patient-health care provider (HCP) communication, its effects on patient satisfaction with oncology care services, and related racial differences. METHODS: The current analysis draws from a population-based survey sample of 1011 African American and 1034 Caucasian American men with newly diagnosed prostate cancer. The variables of satisfaction with health care services, interpersonal treatment, contextual knowledge of the patient, and prostate cancer communication were analyzed using multiple-group structural equation modeling. RESULTS: Regardless of race, patient-HCP communication was related positively to interpersonal treatment by the HCP, HCP's contextual knowledge of the patient, and prostate cancer communication. More positive patient-HCP communication was related to more satisfaction with health care services. Racial differences were significant in the relationships between patient-HCP communication and prostate cancer communication. CONCLUSION: Content and interpersonal relationships are important aspects of patient-HCP communication and affect patient satisfaction with oncologic care for prostate cancer. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: HCPs need to integrate the transfer of information with emotional support and interpersonal connection when they communicate with men with newly diagnosed prostate cancer.
    Patient Education and Counseling 01/2013; · 2.60 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To estimate the treated prevalence of bipolar disorder in a privately insured population, describe the characteristics of children and adolescents receiving these diagnoses, and describe patterns of their psychotropic drug therapy. Retrospective, repeated cross-sectional study. MarketScan Commercial Claims and Encounters inpatient, outpatient, and pharmacy claims databases. A total of 22,360 children and adolescents (aged 0-17 yrs) with one inpatient or two or more outpatient claims for any bipolar spectrum disorder between January 1, 2005, and December 31, 2007. Annual cross-sections were used to estimate the treated prevalence of bipolar disorder diagnoses, patient characteristics, and psychotropic drugs used 30 days after a child's latest recorded bipolar disorder diagnosis within each year. The annual treated prevalence of any bipolar spectrum disorder in this privately insured population was 0.24% in 2005 and 0.26% in 2006 and 2007. Approximately 25% of diagnoses were for children younger than 13 years. Approximately 30% of children had coexisting attention-deficit-hyperactivity disorder during the year. In each year, 35% of patients used no psychotropic drug therapy in the 30-day period after their most recent diagnosis. Twenty-five percent used one psychotropic drug, and 40% used two or more drugs. The most common drug regimens were antipsychotic or mood stabilizer (lithium or anticonvulsant) monotherapy and the combination of mood stabilizers and antipsychotics. Drug therapy patterns suggest that children and adolescents with bipolar diagnoses receive complex treatment regimens, often involving multiple classes of psychotropic drugs. Research on treatment combinations, particularly antipsychotic and mood stabilizer combinations, should be prioritized to better understand the safety and effectiveness of commonly prescribed treatments.
    Pharmacotherapy 12/2012; 32(12):1085-94. · 2.31 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Injectable vitamin D agents are commonly used to manage secondary hyperparathyroidism in dialysis patients. Yet, there are few data documenting the trends and geographic variations in the use of these agents in large, representative samples. We sought to describe patterns and variations in the use of vitamin D formulations (calcitriol, paricalcitol, and doxercalciferol) in hemodialysis patients. We studied patients in the United States Renal Data System between January1999 and December 2008 with Medicare as a primary payer. Annual percentages of patients treated with each type of formulation were tabulated by race, sex, and age at dialysis initiation. The geographical distribution of vitamin D dose per patient was mapped at the state level. Intravenous vitamin D use has increased sharply from 1999 to 2008 with 83.9% of patients treated with any vitamin D formulation in 2008. The use of calcitriol has declined since 1999, going from being administered in 58.6% of patients in 1999 to 1.8% in 2008. Paricalcitol was found to be the overwhelmingly preferred formulation during the study years. In 2008, the average dose among black patients was 84% greater than among white patients (136 mcg vs. 73.6 mcg). Higher doses of vitamin D were administered to patients in the southern region of the country. Vitamin D use has increased and parallels the rise in use of paricalcitol and doxercalciferol. Given the variations in use and known pharmacologic differences in vitamin D formulations, future research should focus on whether the formulations differentially affect patient outcomes.
    Renal Failure 10/2012; · 0.94 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Objective. This study investigated how provider demonstration of and assessment of child use of asthma medication devices and certain aspects of provider-patient communication during medical visits is associated with device technique 1 month later. Methods. Two hundred and ninety-six children aged 8-16 years with persistent asthma and their caregivers were recruited at five North Carolina pediatric practices. All of the medical visits were audio-tape recorded. Children were interviewed 1 month later and their device technique was observed and rated. Results. If the provider asked the child to demonstrate metered dose inhaler technique during the medical visit, then the child was significantly more likely to perform a greater percentage of inhaler steps correctly 1 month later. Children with higher asthma management self-efficacy scores were significantly more likely to perform a greater percentage of diskus steps correctly. Additionally, children were significantly more likely to perform a greater percentage of diskus steps correctly if the provider discussed a written action plan during the visit. Children were significantly more likely to perform a greater percentage of turbuhaler steps correctly if they asked more medication questions. Conclusions. Providers should ask children to demonstrate their inhaler technique during medical visits so that they can educate children about proper technique and improve child asthma management self-efficacy. Providers should encourage children to ask questions about asthma medication devices during visits and they should discuss asthma action plans with families.
    Journal of Asthma 09/2012; 49(9):918-25. · 1.85 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Our objectives were to examine how certain aspects of provider-patient communication recommended by national asthma guidelines (ie, provider asking for child and caregiver input into the asthma treatment plan) were associated with child asthma medication adherence 1 month after an audio-taped medical visit. Children ages 8 through 16 with mild, moderate, or severe persistent asthma and their caregivers were recruited at 5 pediatric practices in nonurban areas of North Carolina. All medical visits were audio-tape recorded. Children were interviewed 1 month after their medical visits, and both children and caregivers reported the child's control medication adherence. Generalized estimating equations were used to determine if communication during the medical visit was associated with medication adherence 1 month later. Children (n = 259) completed a home visit interview ∼1 month after their audio-taped visit, and 216 of these children were taking an asthma control medication at the time of the home visit. Children reported an average control medication adherence for the past week of 72%, whereas caregivers reported the child's average control medication adherence for the past week was 85%. Child asthma management self-efficacy was significantly associated with both child- and caregiver-reported control medication adherence. When providers asked for caregiver input into the asthma treatment plan, caregivers reported significantly higher child medication adherence 1 month later. Providers should ask for caregiver input into their child's asthma treatment plan because it may lead to better control medication adherence.
    PEDIATRICS 09/2012; 130(4):627-33. · 4.47 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE Recent evidence suggests that children are increasingly diagnosed as having bipolar disorder, yet no studies have quantified treatment costs for pediatric patients. The objectives of the study were to identify one-year health services utilization and treatment costs among youths newly diagnosed as having bipolar disorder. METHODS MarketScan administrative claims from 2005 to 2007 were used to construct a retrospective person-level cohort of children ages zero to 17 to identify one-year health services utilization and costs among privately insured youths with a bipolar diagnosis. Inpatient and outpatient services were categorized as mental health related or non-mental health related. Pharmacy costs were classified as psychotropic or nonpsychotropic. RESULTS In the sample (4,973 youths), one-year mean reimbursements for health services were $10,372, and patient out-of-pocket spending was $1,429 per child. Mental health services accounted for 71% of all health care spending, with psychotropic medications and inpatient care contributing the largest proportions of total spending (24% and 27%, respectively). CONCLUSIONS The costs of care among privately insured children with bipolar disorder are similar to those of adults. However, spending on children is concentrated on mental health-related services. Because private insurance plans have historically limited mental health service benefits, the concentration of spending on mental health services may place a greater burden on families for out-of-pocket payments. As mental health parity is adopted by private insurers, monitoring its impact on patient utilization and costs of health services will be important, particularly for children with serious mental illness.
    Psychiatric services (Washington, D.C.) 08/2012; · 2.81 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Objective. The objectives of the study were to (a) describe various factors potentially related to objectively measured adherence to glaucoma medications and self-reported glaucoma medication adherence self-efficacy and (b) examine the relationship between patient race, the number of patient reported-problems, and adherence in taking their glaucoma medication. This was a cross-sectional study conducted at two glaucoma subspecialist referral ophthalmology practices. Methods. We measured subjects' reported problems in using glaucoma medications, adherence to glaucoma medications utilizing the Medication Events Monitoring System (MEMS) devices, and general glaucoma medication adherence self-efficacy using a previously validated 10-item scale. Multivariable logistic and linear regression was used to analyze the data. Results. Seventy-one percent of patients self-reported at least one problem in using their glaucoma medications. White patients were more than 3 times more likely to be 80% adherent in using their glaucoma medications than non-White patients. Patients who had glaucoma longer reported significantly higher glaucoma medication adherence self-efficacy. Patients who reported more problems in using their medications had significantly lower glaucoma medication adherence self-efficacy. Conclusions. Eye care providers should assess patient reported problems and glaucoma medication adherence self-efficacy and work with patients to find ways to reduce the number of problems that patients experience to increase their self-efficacy in using glaucoma medications.
    ISRN ophthalmology. 01/2012; 2012:902819.

Publication Stats

847 Citations
173.84 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2014
    • University of North Carolina at Charlotte
      Charlotte, North Carolina, United States
  • 1997–2014
    • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
      • • Cecil G. Sheps Center for Health Services Research
      • • Division of Pharmaceutical Outcomes and Policy
      • • Department of Health Policy & Management
      North Carolina, United States
  • 2013
    • Marshall University
      • Department of Pharmacy Practice, Administration and Researc
      Huntington, West Virginia, United States
    • Huntington University
      Huntington, West Virginia, United States
  • 2011–2012
    • Harvard Medical School
      • Department of Health Care Policy
      Boston, MA, United States
  • 2005
    • University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center
      Houston, Texas, United States
  • 1996
    • University of Wisconsin, Madison
      • School of Pharmacy
      Madison, MS, United States
    • University of New Mexico
      • College of Pharmacy
      Albuquerque, New Mexico, United States