Antônia E A Oliveira

Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense, Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Are you Antônia E A Oliveira?

Claim your profile

Publications (10)24.88 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Multiplicity of protease inhibitors induced by predators may increase the understanding of a plant's intelligent behavior toward environmental challenges. Information about defense mechanisms of non-genomic model plant passion fruit (Passiflora edulis Sims) in response to predator attack is still limited. Here, via biochemical approaches, we showed its flexibility to build-up a broad repertoire of potent Kunitz-type trypsin inhibitors (KTIs) in response to methyl jasmonate. Seven inhibitors (20-25 kDa) were purified from exposed leaves by chromatographic techniques. Interestingly, the KTIs possessed truncated Kunitz motif in their N-terminus and some of them also presented non-consensus residues. Gelatin-Native-PAGE established multiple isoforms for each inhibitor. Significant differences regarding inhibitors' activity toward trypsin and chymotrypsin were observed, indicating functional polymorphism. Despite its rarity, two of them also inhibited papain, and such bifunctionality suggests a recruiting process onto another mechanistic class of target protease (cysteine-type). All inhibitors acted strongly on midgut proteases from sugarcane borer, Diatraea saccharalis (a lepidopteran insect) while in vivo assays supported their insecticide properties. Moreover, the bifunctional inhibitors displayed activity toward midgut proteases from cowpea weevil, Callosobruchus maculatus (a coleopteran insect). Unexpectedly, all inhibitors were highly effective against midgut proteases from Aedes aegypti a dipteran insect (vector of neglected tropical diseases) opening new avenues for plant-derived PIs for vector control-oriented research. Our results reflect the KTIs' complexities in passion fruit which could be wisely exploited by influencing plant defense conditions. Therefore, the potential of passion fruit as source of bioactive compounds with diversified biotechnological application was strengthened.
    Planta 05/2014; · 3.38 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In order to better understand the physiological functions of protease inhibitors (PIs) the PI activity in buds and flower organs of passion fruit (Passiflora edulis Sims) was investigated. Trypsin and papain inhibitory activities were analyzed in soluble protein extracts from buds at different developmental stages and floral tissues in anthesis. These analyses identified high levels of inhibitory activity against both types of enzymes at all bud stages. Intriguingly, the inhibitory activity against both proteases differed remarkably in some floral tissues. While all organs tested were very effective against trypsin, only sepal and petal tissues exhibited strong inhibitory activity against papain. The sexual reproductive tissues (ovary, stigma-style and stamen) showed either significantly lower activity against papain or practically none. Gelatin-SDS-PAGE assay established that various trypsin inhibitors (TIs) homogenously accumulated in developing buds, although some were differentially present in floral organs. The N-terminal sequence analysis of purified inhibitors from stamen demonstrated they had homology to the Kunitz family of serine PIs. Western-blot analysis established presence of a ∼60 kDa cystatin, whose levels progressively increased during bud development. A positive correlation between this protein and strong papain inhibitory activity was observed in buds and floral tissues, except for the stigma-style. Differences in temporal and spatial accumulation of both types of PIs in passion fruit flowers are thus discussed in light of their potential roles in defense and development.
    Phytochemistry 07/2011; 72(16):1955-61. · 3.35 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The fate of vicilins ingested by Callosobruchus maculatus and the physiological importance of these proteins in larvae and adults were investigated. Vicilins were quantified by ELISA in the haemolymph and fat body during larval development (2nd to 4th instars), in pupae and adults, as well as in ovaries and eggs. Western blot analysis demonstrated that the majority of absorbed vicilins were degraded in the fat body. Tracing the fate of vicilins using FITC revealed that the FITC-vicilin complex was present inside cells of the fat body of the larvae and in the fat bodies of both male and female adult C. maculatus. Labelled vicilin was also detected in ovocytes and eggs. Based on the results presented here, we propose that following absorption, vicilins accumulate in the fat body, where they are partially degraded. These peptides are retained throughout the development of the insects and eventually are sequestered by the eggs. It is possible that accumulation in the eggs is a defensive strategy against pathogen attack as these peptides are known to have antimicrobial activity. Quantifications performed on internal organs from larvae of C. maculatus exposed to extremely dry seeds demonstrated that the vicilin concentration in the haemolymph and fat body was significantly higher when compared to larvae fed on control seeds. These results suggest that absorbed vicilins may also be involved in the survival of larvae in dry environments.
    Journal of insect physiology 03/2010; 56(9):1130-8. · 2.24 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Polyphenol oxidases (PPO) are induced in cowpea plants by wounding. The highest activity levels were detected 48h after this stimulus in both wounded and neighbor-to-wounded unifoliates of cowpea seedlings; the increase of activity was in the order of 13 to 15-fold, respectively, in comparison to control unifoliates. Multiple molecular forms of active PPO (Mrs 58, 73 and congruent with220kDa) were detected by partially denaturing SDS-PAGE. Wounding-induced cowpea PPO were extracted and purified through (NH4)2SO4 precipitation and ion-exchange chromatography. The effects of substrate specificity, pH, thermal stability and sensitivity to various inhibitors - resorcinol, EDTA, sodium azide and tropolone - of partially purified soluble PPO were investigated. Purified wounding-induced cowpea PPO (wicPPO) showed the highest activities towards 4-methylcatechol (Km=9.86mM, Vmax=24.66 EU [DeltaAmin(-1)]) and catechol (Km=3.44mM, Vmax=6.64 EU [DeltaAmin(-1)]); no activity was observed towards l-tyrosine, under the assay conditions used. The optimum pH for wound-induced cowpea PPO was 6.0 with 4-methylcatechol as substrate. The enzyme was optimally activated by 10 mM SDS and was highly stable even after 5 min at 80 degrees C. The most effective inhibitor was tropolone, whereas addition of 10mM of resorcinol, EDTA and sodium azide were able to reduce PPO activities by 40%, 15% and 100%, respectively.
    Phytochemistry 08/2008; 69(12):2297-302. · 3.35 Impact Factor
  • Source
    Entomologia Experimentalis et Applicata 01/2008; 129(1):11-17. · 1.71 Impact Factor
  • Source
    Journal of Stored Products Research 01/2008; 44(4):310-315. · 1.35 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Chitinases (EC 3.2.1.14) are hydrolytic enzymes found in different organisms. In plants, they have been described in different tissues and organs, including seeds. This study was triggered by the isolation of a 30-kDa thermostable chitinase from Adenanthera pavonina L. seeds. The enzyme was submitted to N-terminal amino acid sequencing, and the analysis revealed a high degree of homology with class III chitinases. Bidimensional electrophoresis of the 30-kDa band showed the presence of three isoforms with pIs of 5.2, 5.5 and 5.8. A chitinase was also found in exudates released from the same seeds, which was seen to be immunorelated to the above 30-kDa protein. It was also submitted to N-terminal amino acid sequencing and seen as highly homologous to class III chitinases. In addition, the expression of chitinases during A. pavonina L. seed germination and seedling development was investigated. Seeds were allowed to germinate in the absence of light for approximately 5 days and were grown, for different times, in the absence or presence of light. After each seedling developmental time, samples of exudates, roots and cotyledonary leaves were collected and submitted to protein extraction. The presence of proteins immunorelated to the 30-kDa chitinase was detected in all analyzed samples. Further analyses showed that light significantly interfered with the chitinase expression in some organs. The tissue and subcellular chitinase location in seedling roots was also investigated, and it was majorly localized in the cell wall and in the intercellular spaces of the root hair zone.
    Physiologia Plantarum 10/2007; 131(1):80-8. · 3.66 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Plant cystatins show great potential as tools to genetically engineer resistance of crop plants against pests. Two important potential targets are the bean weevils Acanthoscelides obtectus and Zabrotes subfasciatus, which display major activities of digestive cysteine proteinases in midguts. In this study a cowpea cystatin, a cysteine proteinase inhibitor found in cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) seeds, was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified with a Ni-NTA agarose column. It strongly inhibited papain and proteinases from midguts of both A. obtectus and Z. subfasciatus bruchids, as seen by in vitro assays. When the protein was incorporated into artificial seeds at concentrations as low as 0.025%, and seeds were consumed by the bruchids larva, dramatic reductions in larval weight, and increases in insect mortality were observed. Molecular modeling studies of cowpea cystatin in complex with papain revealed that five N-terminal residues responsible for a large proportion of the hydrophobic interactions involved in the stabilization of the enzyme-inhibitor complex are absent in the partial N-terminal amino acid sequencing of soybean cystatin. We suggest that this structural difference could be the reason for the much higher effectiveness of cowpea cystatin when compared to that previously tested phytocystatin. The application of this knowledge in plant protein mutation programs aiming at enhancement of plant defenses to pests is discussed.
    Proteins Structure Function and Bioinformatics 05/2006; 63(3):662-70. · 3.34 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Insulin is a 6 kDa peptide hormone that activates several metabolic processes and cellular growth. Germination studies showed that insulin, vanadyl sulphate (an insulin mimetic compound), tyrphostin (an inhibitor of insulin receptor kinase activity), pinitol (a chiro inositol analogue) and glucose were able to accelerate Canavalia ensiformis (Jack bean) seedling radicle and epicotyl development. Immunofluorescence microscopy analysis showed that proteins binding to insulin, insulin receptor and phosphoserine antibodies are localized in an internal layer of the C. ensiformis seed coat. These results and others previously reported from our laboratory suggest that insulin, insulin receptor and phosphoserine proteins could be components of signalling pathways akin to those present in animals.
    Plant Growth Regulation 04/2004; 43(1):57-62. · 1.67 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We have confirmed here that the seeds of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris, L.) do not support development of the bruchid Callosobruchus maculatus (F.), a pest of cowpea [Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp] seeds. Analysis of the testa (seed coat) of the bean suggested that neither thickness nor the levels of compounds such as tannic acid, tannins, or HCN are important for the resistance. On the other hand, we have found that phaseolin (vicilin-like 7S storage globulin), detected in the testa by Western blotting and N-terminal amino acid sequencing, is detrimental to the development of C. maculatus. As for the case of other previously studied legume seeds (Canavalia ensiformis and Phaseolus lunatus) we suggest that the presence of vicilin-like proteins in the testa of P. vulgaris may have had a significant role in the evolutionary adaptation of bruchids to the seeds of leguminous plants.
    Anais da Academia Brasileira de Ciências 04/2004; 76(1):57-65. · 0.85 Impact Factor