Sarah Rasheed

Université de Montréal, Montréal, Quebec, Canada

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Publications (4)19.12 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Loss-of-function of the potassium-chloride cotransporter 3 (KCC3) causes hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy with agenesis of the corpus callosum (HMSN/ACC), a severe neurodegenerative disease associated with defective midline crossing of commissural axons in the brain. Conversely, KCC3 over-expression in breast, ovarian and cervical cancer is associated with enhanced tumor cell malignancy and invasiveness. We identified a highly conserved proline-rich sequence within the C-terminus of the cotransporter which when mutated leads to loss of the KCC3-dependent regulatory volume decrease (RVD) response in Xenopus Laevis oocytes. Using SH3 domain arrays, we found that this poly-proline motif is a binding site for SH3-domain containing proteins in vitro. This approach identified the guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) Vav2 as a candidate partner for KCC3. KCC3/Vav2 physical interaction was confirmed using GST-pull down assays and immuno-based experiments. In cultured cervical cancer cells, KCC3 co-localized with the active form of Vav2 in swelling-induced actin-rich protruding sites and within lamellipodia of spreading and migrating cells. These data provide evidence of a molecular and functional link between the potassium-chloride co-transporters and the Rho GTPase-dependent actin remodeling machinery in RVD, cell spreading and cell protrusion dynamics, thus providing new insights into KCC3's involvement in cancer cell malignancy and in corpus callosum agenesis in HMSN/ACC.
    PLoS ONE 05/2013; 8(5):e65294. DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0065294 · 3.23 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Disruption of the potassium/chloride cotransporter 3 (KCC3), encoded by the SLC12A6 gene, causes hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy associated with agenesis of the corpus callosum (HMSN/ACC), a neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorder affecting both the peripheral nervous system and CNS. However, the precise role of KCC3 in the maintenance of ion homeostasis in the nervous system and the pathogenic mechanisms leading to HMSN/ACC remain unclear. We established two Slc12a6 Cre/LoxP transgenic mouse lines expressing C-terminal truncated KCC3 in either a neuron-specific or ubiquitous fashion. Our results suggest that neuronal KCC3 expression is crucial for axon volume control. We also demonstrate that the neuropathic features of HMSN/ACC are predominantly due to a neuronal KCC3 deficit, while the auditory impairment is due to loss of non-neuronal KCC3 expression. Furthermore, we demonstrate that KCC3 plays an essential role in inflammatory pain pathways. Finally, we observed hypoplasia of the corpus callosum in both mouse mutants and a marked decrease in axonal tracts serving the auditory cortex in only the general deletion mutant. Together, these results establish KCC3 as an important player in both central and peripheral nervous system maintenance.
    The Journal of Neuroscience : The Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience 03/2012; 32(11):3865-76. DOI:10.1523/JNEUROSCI.3679-11.2012 · 6.75 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Missense and protein-truncating mutations of the human potassium-chloride co-transporter 3 gene (KCC3) cause hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy with agenesis of the corpus callosum (HMSN/ACC), which is a severe neurodegenerative disease characterized by axonal dysfunction and neurodevelopmental defects. We previously reported that KCC3-truncating mutations disrupt brain-type creatine kinase-dependent activation of the co-transporter through the loss of its last 140 amino acids. Here, we report a novel and more distal HMSN/ACC-truncating mutation (3402C→T; R1134X) that eliminates only the last 17 residues of the protein. This small truncation disrupts the interaction with brain-type creatine kinase in mammalian cells but also affects plasma membrane localization of the mutant transporter. Although it is not truncated, the previously reported HMSN/ACC-causing 619C→T (R207C) missense mutation also leads to KCC3 loss of function in Xenopus oocyte flux assay. Immunodetection in Xenopus oocytes and in mammalian cultured cells revealed a decreased amount of R207C at the plasma membrane, with significant retention of the mutant proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum. In mammalian cells, curcumin partially corrected these mutant protein mislocalizations, with more protein reaching the plasma membrane. These findings suggest that mis-trafficking of mutant protein is an important pathophysiological feature of HMSN/ACC causative KCC3 mutations.
    Journal of Biological Chemistry 06/2011; 286(32):28456-65. DOI:10.1074/jbc.M111.226894 · 4.57 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Missense and protein truncating mutations of the human potassium-chloride co-transporter 3 gene (KCC3) cause hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy with agenesis of the corpus callosum (HMSN/ACC), which is a severe neurodegenerative disease characterized by axonal dysfunction and neurodevelopmental defects. We previously reported that KCC3 truncating mutations disrupt brain-type creatine kinase (CK-B)-dependent activation of the co-transporter through the loss of its last 140 amino acids. Here, we report a novel and more distal HMSN/ACC truncating mutation (3402C→T; R1134X) that eliminates only the last 17 residues of the protein. This small truncation disrupts the interaction with CK-B in mammalian cells but also affects plasma membrane localization of the mutant transporter. Although it is not truncated, the previously reported HMSN/ACC-causing 619C→T; R207C missense mutation also leads to KCC3 loss of function in Xenopus oocytes flux assay. Immunodetection in Xenopus oocytes and in mammalian cultured cells revealed a decreased amount of R207C at the plasma membrane, with significant retention of the mutant proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). In mammalian cells, curcumin partially corrected these mutant protein mislocalizations, with more protein reaching the plasma membrane. These findings suggest that mistrafficking of mutant protein is an important pathophysiological feature of HMSN/ACC causative KCC3 mutations.
    Journal of Biological Chemistry 05/2011; · 4.57 Impact Factor