S S Adams

Akershus universitetssykehus, Kristiania (historical), Oslo County, Norway

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Publications (3)9.37 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: To assess the association between fear of childbirth and duration of labour. A prospective study of women from 32 weeks of gestation through to delivery. Akershus University Hospital, Norway. A total of 2206 pregnant women with a singleton pregnancy and intended vaginal delivery during the period 2008-10. Fear of childbirth was assessed by the Wijma Delivery Expectancy Questionnaire (W-DEQ) version A at 32 weeks of gestation, and defined as a W-DEQ sum score ≥ 85. Information on labour duration, use of epidural analgesia and mode of delivery was obtained from the maternal ward electronic birth records. Labour duration in hours: from 3-4 cm cervical dilatation and three uterine contractions per 10 minutes lasting ≥ 1 minute, until delivery of the child. Fear of childbirth (W-DEQ sum score ≥ 85) was present in 7.5% (165) of women. Labour duration was significantly longer in women with fear of childbirth compared with women with no such fear using a linear regression model (crude unstandardized coefficient 1.54; 95% confidence interval 0.87-2.22, corresponding to a difference of 1 hour and 32 minutes). After adjustment for parity, counselling for pregnancy concern, epidural analgesia, labour induction, labour augmentation, emergency caesarean delivery, instrumental vaginal delivery, offspring birthweight and maternal age, the difference attenuated, but remained statistically significant (adjusted unstandardized coefficient 0.78; 95% confidence interval 0.20-1.35, corresponding to a 47-minute difference). Duration of labour was longer in women with fear of childbirth than in women without fear of childbirth.
    BJOG An International Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology 06/2012; 119(10):1238-46. · 3.76 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To assess the association between mode of delivery and maternal postpartum emotional distress. A prospective study of women from 30 weeks of gestation to 6 months postpartum. Pregnant women in Norway during the period 1998-2008. A total of 55,814 women from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study. Emotional distress was reported in a short form of the Hopkins Symptom Checklist-25 (SCL-8) at 30 weeks of gestation and at 6 months postpartum. Information on mode of delivery was obtained from the Medical Birth Registry of Norway. Changes in SCL-8 score from 30 weeks of gestation to 6 months postpartum and presence of emotional distress at 6 months postpartum. Women with instrumental vaginal, emergency caesarean or elective caesarean deliveries had similar changes in SCL-8 score between 30 weeks of gestation and 6 months postpartum, as compared with women with unassisted vaginal delivery (adjusted regression coefficient, 0.00, 95% CI -0.01 to 0.01; 0.01, 95% CI 0.00-0.02; and -0.01, 95% CI -0.02 to 0.00, respectively). The corresponding odds ratios (ORs) associated with the presence of emotional distress at 6 months postpartum (SCL-8 ≥ 2.0) were: OR 1.01, 95% CI 0.86-1.18; OR 1.13, 95% CI 0.97-1.32; and OR 0.96, 95% CI 0.79-1.16, respectively. These estimates were adjusted for emotional distress during pregnancy and other potential confounding factors. Emotional distress during pregnancy showed the strongest association with the presence of emotional distress at 6 months postpartum (adjusted OR 14.09, 95% CI 12.77-15.55). Mode of delivery was not associated with a change in SCL-8 score from 30 weeks of gestation to 6 months postpartum or with the presence of emotional distress postpartum.
    BJOG An International Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology 11/2011; 119(3):298-305. · 3.76 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To assess the association between maternal emotional distress in pregnancy and delivery of a small-for-gestational age offspring. A cohort study in pregnancy. Fifty hospitals with a maternity ward in Norway during 1998-2008. Seventy-one thousand eight hundred and ninety-eight women with a singleton pregnancy in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study were followed from early pregnancy to delivery. Information on presence of emotional distress was obtained through self-administered questionnaires in pregnancy weeks 17 and 30 and on birthweight, gestational length at delivery and sex by linkage to the Medical Birth Registry of Norway. Emotional distress was measured by short forms of the Hopkins Symptom Checklist-25. Small-for-gestational age offspring (birthweight <2.5th percentile). Being emotionally distressed at gestational weeks 17 and 30 was not significantly associated with subsequent delivery of a small-for-gestational age infant (adjusted odds ratio 1.16; 95% confidence interval 0.87-1.54). This estimate was adjusted for smoking in pregnancy, parity, diabetes, pre-eclampsia, body mass index, education and maternal age. Emotional distress during pregnancy was not associated with subsequent delivery of a small-for-gestational age infant.
    Acta Obstetricia Et Gynecologica Scandinavica 06/2011; 90(11):1267-73. · 1.85 Impact Factor