S. V. Marler

Bristol-Myers Squibb, New York City, New York, United States

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Publications (13)15.88 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: This post hoc analysis assessed the safety, tolerability and effectiveness of long-term treatment with aripiprazole adjunctive to either bupropion or selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs)/serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD).
    BMC Research Notes 07/2014; 7(1):459.
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    ABSTRACT: There is a paucity of evidence for outcome predictors in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) not responding to initial antidepressant therapy (ADT). This post-hoc analysis evaluated whether MDD severity affects response to adjunctive aripiprazole. Data from 3 randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials of adjunctive aripiprazole in adults with MDD and inadequate response to 1 to 3 ADT trials were pooled and stratified based on Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) total score (mild, ≤24; moderate, 25-30; severe, ≥31). Treatment differences in change in MADRS total score and rates of response (≥50% MADRS improvement) and remission (response with MADRS total score ≤10) were analyzed at endpoint. Adverse events were assessed within each subgroup. Aripiprazole produced greater improvement than placebo in the MADRS total score regardless of MDD severity at baseline (between-treatment difference [95% CI]: mild, -2.5 [-4.0 to -1.1]; moderate, -3.2 [-4.9 to -1.6]; severe, -4.5 [-6.8 to -2.2]). Compared with placebo, adjunctive aripiprazole increased the likelihood of response in all subgroups (risk ratio [95% CI]: mild, 1.50 [1.15, 1.95]; moderate, 1.51 [1.09, 2.11]; severe, 1.95 [1.23, 3.10]). Common treatment-emergent adverse events included akathisia and restlessness. The original studies were not designed to assess the efficacy of adjunctive aripiprazole by baseline severity, and this post-hoc analysis was not powered to evaluate differences in severity subgroups. In patients who failed to respond to initial ADT, adjunctive aripiprazole was more effective than placebo in mild, moderate, and severe MDD strata. ClinicalTrial.gov: NCT00095823, NCT00105196, and NCT00095758.
    Journal of affective disorders 06/2014; 162:20-5. · 3.76 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of prior antipsychotic exposure (PAE) on safety and tolerability outcomes in pediatric subjects receiving aripiprazole treatment. Methods: This study was a post-hoc analysis of pooled data from two 8-week, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled studies evaluating aripiprazole for the treatment of irritability in pediatric subjects with autistic disorder, aged 6-17 years. Subjects were stratified by PAE; adverse events (AEs), and changes in weight, and metabolic measures were evaluated. For subjects receiving aripiprazole, regardless of PAE, baseline weight, age, gender, and symptom severity were evaluated in a regression model predicting body weight change. Results: Of 316 randomized subjects, 259 (82.0%) were antipsychotic naïve (AN) and 57 (18.0%) had a PAE. Aripiprazole-treated AN subjects were more likely than PAE subjects to report somnolence (11.9% vs. 2.8%), sedation (22.7% vs. 11.1%), or fatigue (17.0% vs. 13.9%). Rates of extrapyramidal disorder and drooling, but not akathisia or tremor, were marginally higher in AN subjects. Overall, 10.8% of aripiprazole-treated AN subjects had at least one AE leading to discontinuation compared with 8.3% of aripiprazole-treated PAE subjects. AN subjects receiving aripiprazole had a larger change in weight from baseline to endpoint compared with those receiving placebo (1.9 vs. 0.7 kg; treatment difference 1.2 kg, 95% CI: 0.5, 1.9) than PAE subjects receiving aripiprazole compared with subjects receiving placebo (0.4 vs. -0.4 kg; treatment difference 0.9 kg, 95% CI: -0.6, 2.4). Regression analysis identified that younger subjects with higher baseline weight z-score were at highest risk for weight gain. There were no significant changes in metabolic measures compared with placebo in either group. Conclusions: Weight gain was more pronounced in AN subjects and more likely to occur in younger subjects with a higher baseline weight z-score. AN subjects were more likely to experience AEs related to somnolence. However, based on discontinuations rates from AEs, overall tolerability was good for both AN and PAE groups. Clinical trial registration: Study of aripiprazole in the treatment of children and adolescents with autistic disorder. Registry: www.clinicaltrials.gov . Identifiers: NCT00332241 and NCT00337571.
    Journal of child and adolescent psychopharmacology 10/2013; 23(8):572-6. · 2.59 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Differences in response to treatment have been observed for bipolar disorder (BPD) patients with manic or mixed episodes. This post-hoc analysis examined the maintenance effect of aripiprazole in combination with lithium or valproate in subpopulations of patients entering a relapse prevention study with either manic or mixed bipolar episodes. METHODS: A long-term relapse prevention study of BPD patients with manic or mixed episodes included a single-blind stabilization phase, in which patients were stabilized with single-blind aripiprazole plus lithium or valproate (maintaining stability for 12 weeks), and a double-blind relapse assessment phase, where patients were randomized to aripiprazole or placebo plus lithium or valproate for up to 52 weeks. Lithium and valproate groups were pooled. RESULTS: The time to relapse of any mood episode was longer in the adjunctive aripiprazole group versus the lithium/valproate monotherapy group for the manic (p<0.01) but not mixed population (p=0.59). The LOCF analysis indicated a significantly greater reduction in YMRS total score from baseline with continued aripiprazole versus placebo at 52 weeks in both manic (treatment difference=-3.32, p<0.01) and mixed episode populations (treatment difference=-2.56, p=0.02). Overall, adverse event profiles were similar between the populations. LIMITATION: The lithium and valproate subgroups were combined. CONCLUSIONS: The continuation of aripiprazole in stabilized BPD patients treated with lithium or valproate increased the time to relapse of any mood episode for manic but not mixed patients; both groups achieved greater stability in YMRS total score with adjunctive aripiprazole. Thus, adjunctive aripiprazole may be more appropriate for stabilized patients with manic episodes.
    Journal of affective disorders 01/2013; · 3.76 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Bipolar I disorder (BPD) patients are often overweight or obese, and likely to have metabolic syndrome. Several medications used to treat BPD are associated with increased body weight and/or worsening metabolic parameters. METHODS: Metabolic data were analyzed from two efficacy studies of aripiprazole plus the mood stabilizers, lithium/valproate (Study CN138-189), or lamotrigine (Study CN138-392), in the long-term treatment (52 weeks) of BPD. Changes in body weight, individual metabolic parameters, and incidence of metabolic syndrome were assessed. RESULTS: In the lithium/valproate study, modest increases in body weight were observed at Week 52 in both groups: 1.7±0.8kg in the lithium/valproate group, and 1.6±0.7kg in the adjunctive aripiprazole group; this difference was nonsignificant. In the lamotrigine study, decreases in body weight were observed at Week 52 with lamotrigine alone (-2.2±1.0kg), whereas a modest increase was observed when combined with aripiprazole (0.4±1.0kg). In both studies, rates of metabolic syndrome at 52 weeks did not increase from baseline with aripiprazole, and median changes from baseline in individual metabolic syndrome parameters were similar with both mood stabilizer monotherapy and the addition of aripiprazole as an adjunctive therapy. LIMITATIONS: This was a post-hoc analysis, and a low percentage of patients completed the lamotrigine study. CONCLUSIONS: Aripiprazole plus a mood stabilizer has minimal impact on metabolic changes in predominantly overweight/obese BPD patients over a 52-week period. In both studies, modest mean increases in weight with the addition of aripiprazole were not accompanied by increased rates of metabolic syndrome or changes in metabolic parameters.
    Journal of affective disorders 12/2012; · 3.76 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: To assess varying levels of response to aripiprazole adjunctive to standard antidepressant therapy (ADT) and the predictive value of an early response for a sustained response.Method: This post hoc analysis of 3 similarly designed randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase 3 studies investigated the efficacy and safety of adjunctive aripiprazole to standard ADT in patients with major depressive disorder (DSM-IV-TR criteria) who had a prior inadequate response to 1-3 ADTs (CN138-139 [September 2004-December 2006], CN138-163 [June 2004-April 2006], and CN138-165 [March 2005-April 2008]). Response levels were defined as percent decreases from baseline in Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) total score after 6 weeks of treatment, with a ≤ 25% decrease for minimal, > 25 to < 50% decrease for partial, ≥ 50% to < 75% decrease for moderate, and ≥ 75% decrease for a robust response to treatment.Results: More patients receiving adjunctive aripiprazole exhibited a partial (23.9% vs 17.9%, P = .017), moderate (23.1% vs 15.0%, P < .001), and robust response (14.3% vs 7.4%, P < .001) compared with adjunctive placebo. Adjunctive aripiprazole treatment compared with adjunctive placebo treatment was associated with a significantly greater proportion of patients achieving an early response (week 2, ≥ 50% reduction in MADRS total score, n = 110/539 vs n = 47/525, P < .001, number needed to treat = 9) and an endpoint response (relative risk = 1.7, 95% CI = 1.4-2.0, P < .001, number needed to treat = 7). A univariate logistic regression analysis revealed that an early response was a significant predictor of endpoint remission (P < .001).Conclusions: Aripiprazole augmentation was associated with a significantly greater proportion of patients achieving a partial, moderate, or robust response to treatment compared with ADT alone. Patients showing an early response (week 2) to augmentation maintained their response through endpoint, suggesting that clinicians may make clinically meaningful decisions early during treatment.Trial Registration:ClinicalTrials.gov identifiers: NCT00095823, NCT00095758, and NCT00105196.
    The primary care companion to CNS disorders. 01/2012; 14(3).
  • European Neuropsychopharmacology - EUR NEUROPSYCHOPHARMACOL. 01/2011; 21.
  • European Psychiatry - EUR PSYCHIAT. 01/2011; 26:631-631.
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    ABSTRACT: Effective management of major depressive disorder often includes the long-term use of multiple medications, and the longer-term utility and safety of adjunctive aripiprazole has not been evaluated in a controlled setting. Patients (n = 706) completing one of two 14-week double-blind studies of aripiprazole augmentation, as well as de novo patients (n = 296) nonresponsive to current antidepressant therapy, were enrolled in this open-label study. Patients received open-label aripiprazole for up to 52 weeks. Open-label treatment was completed by 323 patients (32.2%). At endpoint (n = 987), the mean dose of aripiprazole was 10.1 mg/day. Common (>15% of patients) spontaneously reported adverse events were akathisia (26.2%), fatigue (18.0%), and weight gain (17.1%). The incidence of serious adverse events was 4.0%. Four spontaneous reports of possible tardive dyskinesia were submitted (0.4%); all resolved within 45 days of drug discontinuation. Mean weight change was 4.4 kg; 36.6% experienced ≥7% increase in weight from baseline (observed case analysis, n = 303). No clinically relevant changes in other metabolic parameters were seen. At the end of open-label treatment, 221 patients (69.7%) had a Clinical Global Impression-Severity of Illness score of 1 (not at all ill) or 2 (borderline ill). Long-term adjunctive aripiprazole therapy was well tolerated with an acceptable long-term safety and tolerability profile in patients with major depressive disorder who had not responded to treatment with one or more antidepressant therapies. Clinically significant weight gain was observed in about one-third of patients. Overall, the adverse event profile was consistent with that reported in the short-term trials and readily managed clinically.
    Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment 01/2011; 7:303-12. · 2.00 Impact Factor
  • European Psychiatry - EUR PSYCHIAT. 01/2011; 26:630-630.
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    European Neuropsychopharmacology - EUR NEUROPSYCHOPHARMACOL. 01/2011; 21.
  • European Neuropsychopharmacology - EUR NEUROPSYCHOPHARMACOL. 01/2011; 21.
  • European Neuropsychopharmacology - EUR NEUROPSYCHOPHARMACOL. 01/2011; 21.