S. Bermudo Conde

Hospital Universitario Clinica San Rafael, Μπογκοτά, Bogota D.C., Colombia

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Publications (4)2.61 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: IntroductionCerebrovascular disease is associated with high morbidity and mortality. In 2008, the Spanish Ministry of Health published its Clinical Practice Guidelines for stroke prevention, but implementation of that document has not yet been assessed. Our study aims to investigate compliance with the Guidelines by analysing control over vascular risk factors, antithrombotic treatment and lipid lowering treatment in patients who had suffered an acute ischaemic stroke and who were under the care of neurologists or internists.Methods Cross-sectional study based on data from clinical reports (vascular risk factors, diagnosis and treatment), blood pressure readings and laboratory tests pertaining to 203 patients diagnosed with acute ischaemic stroke and admitted to a medium-to-long stay hospital for rehabilitation and care.ResultsThe mean patient age was 75 ± 10 years; 56% were women. The most common risk factors were hypertension (68%) and diabetes mellitus (40%). Intravenous fibrinolytic therapy had been administered to 8.9% of the patients. Of the patients with thrombotic cerebral infarction, 91.7% received antiplatelet agents; 59.4% of patients with embolic infarction received anticoagulants. Statins were prescribed to 65% of patients with thrombotic infarction. Laboratory tests upon admission showed that 23% of patients had total cholesterol levels above 175 mg/dl and 26.6% had plasma glucose levels above 126 mg/dl. Of the patient total, 70% received antihypertensive therapy, but 47.5% had blood pressure levels above 130/80 mm Hg.Conclusions In our opinion, secondary prevention of acute cerebrovascular disease could be improved, mainly by increasing the percentage of patients treated with antiplatelet or anticoagulant drugs (depending on aetiology), increasing prescription of statins, and improving blood pressure control
    Neurología. 04/2013; 28(3):137–144.
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    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Cerebrovascular disease is associated with high morbidity and mortality. In 2008, the Spanish Ministry of Health published its Clinical Practice Guidelines for stroke prevention, but implementation of that document has not yet been assessed. Our study aims to investigate compliance with the Guidelines by analysing control over vascular risk factors, antithrombotic treatment and lipid lowering treatment in patients who had suffered an acute ischaemic stroke and who were under the care of neurologists or internists. METHODS: Cross-sectional study based on data from clinical reports (vascular risk factors, diagnosis and treatment), blood pressure readings and laboratory tests pertaining to 203 patients diagnosed with acute ischaemic stroke and admitted to a medium-to-long stay hospital for rehabilitation and care. RESULTS: The mean patient age was 75±10 years; 56% were women. The most common risk factors were hypertension (68%) and diabetes mellitus (40%). Intravenous fibrinolytic therapy had been administered to 8.9% of the patients. Of the patients with thrombotic cerebral infarction, 91.7% received antiplatelet agents; 59.4% of patients with embolic infarction received anticoagulants. Statins were prescribed to 65% of patients with thrombotic infarction. Laboratory tests upon admission showed that 23% of patients had total cholesterol levels above 175mg/dl and 26.6% had plasma glucose levels above 126mg/dl. Of the patient total, 70% received antihypertensive therapy, but 47.5% had blood pressure levels above 130/80mm Hg. CONCLUSIONS: In our opinion, secondary prevention of acute cerebrovascular disease could be improved, mainly by increasing the percentage of patients treated with antiplatelet or anticoagulant drugs (depending on aetiology), increasing prescription of statins, and improving blood pressure control.
    Neurologia 06/2012;
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives: To determine the prevalence of hyponutrition at admission at a mid- to long-term stay hospital. To analyze the possible factors associated to hyponutrition; the possible relationship with mortality at one month, and the treatments for hyponutrition performed. Materials and method: Descriptive study from the laboratory data obtained in 140 patients. For diagnosing hyponutrition, a tool based on albumin, total cholesterol, and lymphocytes levels was used. Demographical (age and gender) and clinical data (presence of pressure soars, nasogastric tube, dementia, neoplasm, previous admission to the ICU, and main diagnosis) were gathered at admission as well as the mortality at the first month. The treatments used for hyponutrition were reviewed. Results: patients' age was 77.1 years and 63% were females. 17.1% of the patients presented normal nutritional status, 50.7% met the criteria for mild hyponutrition, 26.4% of moderate hyponutrition, and 5.7% of severe hyponutrition. We found no association between hyponutrition and gender, nasogastric tube, soars, dementia or neoplasm, but we did so with age (P = 0.033). We found a relationship between moderate-severe hyponutrition and pressure soars (P = 0.036). We found an association between hyponutrition and mortality at one month (OR = 1.357, 95% CI 1.121 to 1.643; P = 0.02). 35.6% of the patients with moderate-severe hyponutrition received therapy for this condition (28.9% with protein supplements and 6.7% with enteral diet). Conclusions: hyponutrition affects most of the patients admitted to a mid to long-term stay hospitals and is associated with higher mortality. One third of hyponutrition patients receive nutritional therapy.
    Nutricion hospitalaria: organo oficial de la Sociedad Espanola de Nutricion Parenteral y Enteral 04/2011; 26(2):369-375. · 1.31 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To determine the prevalence of hyponutrition at admission at a mid- to long-term stay hospital. To analyze the possible factors associated to hyponutrition; the possible relationship with mortality at one month, and the treatments for hyponutrition performed. Descriptive study from the laboratory data obtained in 140 patients. For diagnosing hyponutrition, a tool based on albumin, total cholesterol, and lymphocytes levels was used. Demographical (age and gender) and clinical data (presence of pressure soars, nasogastric tube, dementia, neoplasm, previous admission to the ICU, and main diagnosis) were gathered at admission as well as the mortality at the first month. The treatments used for hyponutrition were reviewed. patients' age was 77.1 years and 63% were females. 17.1% of the patients presented normal nutritional status, 50.7% met the criteria for mild hyponutrition, 26.4% of moderate hyponutrition, and 5.7% of severe hyponutrition. We found no association between hyponutrition and gender, nasogastric tube, soars, dementia or neoplasm, but we did so with age (P = 0.033). We found a relationship between moderate-severe hyponutrition and pressure soars (P = 0.036). We found an association between hyponutrition and mortality at one month (OR = 1.357, 95% CI 1.121 to 1.643; P = 0.02). 35.6% of the patients with moderate-severe hyponutrition received therapy for this condition (28.9% with protein supplements and 6.7% with enteral diet). hyponutrition affects most of the patients admitted to a mid to long-term stay hospitals and is associated with higher mortality. One third of hyponutrition patients receive nutritional therapy.
    Nutricion hospitalaria: organo oficial de la Sociedad Espanola de Nutricion Parenteral y Enteral 04/2011; 26(2):369-75. · 1.31 Impact Factor