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Publications (4)17.72 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Evidences suggest that β3 -adrenoceptor (β3-AR) plays an important role in heart failure (HF), although no data is reported indicating how these effects may change with the increasing age. Pulmonary congestion and edema are the major life-threatening complications associated with HF. The purpose of this study is to explore the relationship between the anti-β3-AR autoantibody and the expression of β3-AR in the lungs and heart for both aged patients and rats with HF. Synthetic β3-AR peptides served as the target antigens in ELISA were used to screen the anti-β3-AR autoantibody in aged patients and rats. Two aged rat models were constructed based on aortic banding and sham-operation. The expression of β3-AR mRNA and protein in the lung and heart was measured in intervention and non-intervention groups by Western blot analysis at the baseline, 5(th), 7(th), 9(th) and 11(th) week, respectively. The frequency and titer of anti-β3-AR autoantibody in aged patients and rats with HF were higher than those in the control group (p<0.05). The expression of β3-AR mRNA and protein in pulmonary tissues decreased continually from the 7(th) week (p<0.05), followed by HF observed during the 9(th) week. The expression of β3-AR in myocardial tissues continued to increase after the 9(th) week (p<0.05), and the expression of both β3-AR mRNA and protein in the BRL group [HF group with BRL37344 (4-[-[2-hydroxy-(3-chlorophenyl)ethyl-amino] phenoxyacetic acid) (a β3-AR agonist) injection] was positively correlated with BRL37344 when compared with non-BRL group (HF group without BRL37344 injection) (p<0.05). Anti-β3-AR autoantibody was detected in aged patients and rats with HF. The expression of β3-AR mRNA and protein in pulmonary tissues decreased continually, and began earlier than in the heart, but its expression in myocardial tissues increased continually and could be further promoted by β3-AR agonist.
    PLoS ONE 01/2013; 8(7):e68747. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Previous studies indicate aging results in significantly decreased cardiac function and increased myocardial apoptosis after myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (MI/R) in humans or rats. The underlying mechanisms of aging-exacerbated effects remain unknown. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) are known to play vital roles in aging-related MI/R injury. Heretofore, the effects of aging upon ROS and RNS formation were not investigated in humans, which is the focus of the current study. Due to experimental limitations with clinical trials, an additional animal experiment was performed. All enrolled acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients received percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) therapy. AMI patients were assigned into two groups: adult (age <65, n = 34) and elderly (age ≥65, n = 45) AMI patients. Blood samples were obtained from all study participants at 24 h and 3 days post-PCI. Plasma/white blood cell (WBC) ROS and RNS markers (malondialdehyde (MDA), myeloperoxidase (MPO), reduced glutathione (GSH), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) activity, NOx, and nitrotyrosine) were determined. The same markers were determined in rat cardiac tissue after 24 h MI/R. Compared to the adult group, elderly patients manifested increased plasma MDA and MPO and decreased plasma GSH concentrations. No significant differences in plasma NOx or nitrotyrosine concentration existed between adult and elderly patients. Furthermore, WBC iNOS activity in elderly patients was significantly decreased compared to the adult group. The measurement of ROS markers in the rat experiments was consistent and supported human study data. Surprisingly, RNS markers (NOx and nitrotyrosine) in blood and heart tissue increased from young to middle-aged rats but decreased from middle age to old age. Aging augments ROS, which might exacerbate MI/R injury. Additionally, our data support aging-induced changes of RNS levels in humans and rats in vivo.
    Age 05/2012; · 6.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Previous studies indicated aging results in the significant cardiac function decreasing and myocardial apoptosis increasing in normal humans or rats. Additionally, animal experiments demonstrated aging increased myocardial ischemia / reperfusion (MI/R)-induced apoptosis. However, whether more myocardial apoptosis happen in the old acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients is unclear. Reperfusion injury-induced apoptosis is an important cause of heart failure. This study determined the effect of aging upon myocardial apoptosis and cardiac function in patients suffering AMI. All enrolled AMI patients received percutaneous coronary intervention therapy. Volunteers and AMI patients were assigned to four groups: adult (age <65, n = 24) volunteers, elderly (age ≥65, n = 21) volunteers, adult (age <65, n = 29) AMI patients, and elderly (age ≥65, n = 36) AMI patients. Blood samples were obtained from all study participants. Plasma apoptotic markers (soluble form of Fas, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and interleukin 6) levels were determined. Cardiac function was evaluated with echocardiogram and Killip class. Due to lack of a direct apoptotic assay method in live human subjects, an additional animal experiment was performed. Both young (2 months) and old (24 months) rats were subjected to 30-min myocardial ischemia and 3 (for TUNEL/caspase activity apoptotic assay) or 24-h (for cardiac function determination) reperfusion. Compared to adult patients, the elderly patients manifested decreased cardiac function and increased plasma apoptotic marker levels significantly. The animal experiment results (cardiac function and plasma apoptotic markers assays) were consistent with the human result data. Animal TUNEL staining and caspase activity measurement revealed a higher myocardial apoptotic ratio in the older rat group. Aging exacerbated MI/R injury in humans and rats. Differential myocardial apoptosis may play a vital role in mediating the observed effects.
    Age 06/2011; 34(3):621-32. · 6.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Stimulation of beta1- and beta2-adrenergic receptors (ARs) in the heart results in positive inotropy. In contrast, it has been reported that the beta3-AR is also expressed in the heart and that its stimulation leads to negative inotropic effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of beta3-AR in age-related heart-failure rats and its relevance to left ventricular dysfunction. Aging male Wistar rats were divided into young and aging groups according to age, and each group included sham-operation and heart-failure subgroups. Left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP) and the ratio of left ventricular weight to body weight (LV/BW) were significantly higher for the aging heart-failure versus young heart-failure and the heart-failure versus sham-operation groups (P < 0.01, respectively). However, the left ventricular end-systolic pressure (LVESP) and the maximal rate of rise or fall of left ventricular pressure were all significantly lower for the aging heart-failure versus young heart-failure and the heart-failure versus sham-operation groups (P < 0.01, respectively). beta3-AR protein levels increased significantly when heart failure worsened in aging rats. These results suggest that beta3-AR expression in age-related heart-failure rats and left ventricular function were highly correlated.
    Journal of Receptor and Signal Transduction Research 05/2010; 30(4):227-33. · 1.63 Impact Factor