J de la Cuadra

Consorcio Hospital General Universitario de Valencia, Valenza, Valencia, Spain

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Publications (53)77.39 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Methylchloroisothiazolinone (MCI) and methylisothiazolinone (MI) are heterocyclic compounds used as preservatives in cosmetic and industrial products. They continue to be common allergens, causing positive patch test reactions in 2% to 4% of patients tested. We searched the database at our skin allergy unit for all cases of sensitization to MCI/MI and MI diagnosed between January 1980 and March 2013. Patch tests were performed with MCI/MI in 8705 patients and with MI in 404 patients. In total, 222 patients (2.55%) were sensitized to MCI/MI and 21 (5.19%) were sensitized to MI. The incidence of MCI/MI cases peaked between 1998 and 2005 and again between 2009 and 2013. Of the 222 patients with MCI/MI sensitization, 142 were women (64%) and 49 were men (36%); the mean age was 43years. The most frequently affected areas were the hands (54% of cases), the arms (36%), and the face (35%); 75.67% of cases were due to cosmetics and 2.25% were due to paint. Of the 21 patients with MI sensitization (mean age, 50years), 12 were women (57%) and 9 were men (43%). The most common site of involvement in this group was the face (71% of cases), followed by the arms (38%) and the hands (29%). All the cases were due to cosmetics. Our data show that sensitization to the combination of MCI and MI and MI alone has increased in recent years. It would appear to be necessary to add MI to the baseline patch test series, although the test concentration has yet to be determined.
    Actas Dermo-Sifiliográficas 03/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Background Methylchloroisothiazolinone (MCI) and methylisothiazolinone (MI) are heterocyclic compounds used as preservatives in cosmetic and industrial products. They continue to be common allergens, causing positive patch test reactions in 2% to 4% of patients tested. Material and methods We searched the database at our skin allergy unit for all cases of sensitization to MCI/MI and MI diagnosed between January 1980 and March 2013. Results Patch tests were performed with MCI/MI in 8705 patients and with MI in 404 patients. In total, 222 patients (2.55%) were sensitized to MCI/MI and 21 (5.19%) were sensitized to MI. The incidence of MCI/MI cases peaked between 1998 and 2005 and again between 2009 and 2013. Of the 222 patients with MCI/MI sensitization, 142 were women (64%) and 49 were men (36%); the mean age was 43 years. The most frequently affected areas were the hands (54% of cases), the arms (36%), and the face (35%); 75.67% of cases were due to cosmetics and 2.25% were due to paint. Of the 21 patients with MI sensitization (mean age, 50 years), 12 were women (57%) and 9 were men (43%). The most common site of involvement in this group was the face (71% of cases), followed by the arms (38%) and the hands (29%). All the cases were due to cosmetics. Conclusions Our data show that sensitization to the combination of MCI and MI and MI alone has increased in recent years. It would appear to be necessary to add MI to the baseline patch test series, although the test concentration has yet to be determined.
    Actas Dermo-Sifiliográficas 01/2014;
  • Actas Dermo-Sifiliográficas 01/2014; 105(1):92–93.
  • Actas Dermo-Sifiliográficas 03/2013;
  • Francesc Messeguer, Anna Agustí-Mejias, Jesús De La Cuadra
    Piel 04/2012; 27(4):227–229.
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    ABSTRACT: Background:  The two most common agent groups currently responsible for photoallergic contact dermatitis (PACD) are organic ultraviolet (UV) absorbers in sunscreens and topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). However, availability of information on the photoallergenic potential of these agents is scarce. Objectives:  To obtain current information on the frequency of PACD to 19 organic UV absorbers and 5 topical NSAIDs, including newer agents, in common usage in Europe. Methods:  A prospective, multi-centre photopatch test study of 1,031 patients attending for investigation of suspected PACD in 30 centres across 12 European countries. Results:  A total of 346 PACD reactions in 200 (19.4%) subjects occurred. PACD was most commonly caused by the topical NSAIDs ketoprofen (128 subjects) and etofenamate (59 subjects). Of the organic UV absorbers, octocrylene, benzophenone-3 and butyl methoxydibenzoylmethane most frequently elicited PACD. The "newer" organic sunscreen absorbers rarely led to PACD. There appeared to be an association between the agents ketoprofen, octocrylene and benzophenone-3, with several subjects developing PACD to two or all three agents concomitantly. Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) was less commonly observed than PACD, comprising 55 reactions in 47 (4.6%) subjects. Irritant reactions and photoaugmentation and photoinhibition of ACD occurred infrequently. Conclusions:  The EMCPPTS has provided current information on the relative frequency of PACD to common photoallergens. Such data will be of value when deciding on which agents to include in future European "baseline" photopatch test series.
    British Journal of Dermatology 01/2012; · 3.76 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Hand eczema is common in children, but affected children are seldom patch tested. Relatively few studies have assessed patch testing in the paediatric population, and none has specifically evaluated its use in hand eczema in children. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of contact allergy in children with hand eczema, and to identify the most frequent allergens and their relevance. We performed a 5-year retrospective study of children (aged 0-15 years) with hand eczema tested with the Spanish baseline series at the Dermatology Departments of 11 Spanish hospitals. During the study period, 11 729 patients were patch tested, of whom 480 were children. Hand eczema was present in 111 (23.1%) of the children and in 3437 (30.5%) of the adults. Of the children with hand eczema, 46.8% had at least one positive reaction in the patch tests. Current relevance was found for 78% of the allergens detected. The most common allergens were nickel sulfate, methylchloroisothiazolinone/methylisothiazolinone, and fragrance mix I. Allergic contact dermatitis was the most frequent diagnosis (36%), followed by atopic dermatitis. Allergic contact dermatitis was the most usual diagnosis in our series of children with hand eczema. We recommend patch testing of all children with chronic hand eczema, as is already performed in adults.
    Contact Dermatitis 06/2011; 65(4):213-9. · 2.93 Impact Factor
  • P Hernández-Bel, J de la Cuadra, R García, V Alegre
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    ABSTRACT: Protein contact dermatitis (PCD) is a rare and underdiagnosed condition that many dermatologists fail to recognize. Nevertheless, increasing awareness of the condition and the substances responsible has led to a rise in the number of published cases in recent years. To determine the clinical characteristics and allergens implicated in PCD in our setting. A retrospective observational study of all patients diagnosed with PCD in the last 10 years was undertaken in the Skin Allergies Unit of the Department of Dermatology at Hospital General Universitario in Valencia, Spain. All patients were assessed by skin-prick test with the standard GEIDAC allergen panel and by prick-by-prick test with foods or other products that were linked to immediate skin symptoms following handling. Twenty-seven patients (8 men and 19 women) were diagnosed with PCD, and 26 of the cases were occupational in origin. The mean age of the patients was 32.3 years and 51.8% had a history of atopy. The latency period varied from 2 months to 27 years. The most commonly affected areas were the backs of the hands and the forearms. Four patients had an oral allergy syndrome. In order of frequency, the substances responsible for PCD were fish (9 patients, 33.3%), latex (8 patients, 29.6%), potato (4 patients, 14.8%), chicken (3 patients, 11.1%), flour (3 patients, 11.1%), alpha amylase (2 patients, 7.4%), aubergine (2 patients, 7.4%), pork (1 patient, 3.7%), garlic (1 patient, 3.7%), and Anisakis (1 patient, 3.7%). PCD is a clinically relevant condition that dermatologists should include in the differential diagnosis of chronic dermatitis affecting the hands or forearms in patients at high occupational risk, particular those in the food preparation industry.
    Actas Dermo-Sifiliográficas 06/2011; 102(5):336-43.
  • Actas Dermo-Sifiliográficas 12/2010; 101(10):896-8.
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    ABSTRACT: To develop a self-administered short questionnaire to assess patient satisfaction with medical treatment for hand eczema (dermatitis) with good psychometric properties. The content of the questionnaire was determined on the basis of clinical consultation with groups of patients, from studying the existing instruments, and from discussions with a panel of seven experts. A first draft version containing 38 items organised in six dimensions was tested on a pilot sample of patients to assess its legibility. The extended version was then tested on a sample of 217 patients of both genders enrolled at 18 hospitals representative of the national distribution. The questionnaire was supplied together with the Morisky-Green compliance questionnaire, the health-related quality of life (HRQL) SF-12 questionnaire, and a visual analogue scale (VAS) of perceived health status to assess concurrent validity. The dimensionality was reduced by means of exploratory factor analysis, and reliability was evaluated on the basis of internal consistency and two halves reliability estimates. Item discriminant capability and questionnaire discriminant validity with respect to known groups of patients (by gender, principal diagnosis, age, disease severity and treatment) were also assessed. The reduction and validation sample was composed of 54% women and 46% men, of various educational levels with an average age of 43 years (SD = 13.7). Of those who responded, 26% were diagnosed with hyperkeratotic dermatitis of the palms and 27% of the fingertips, and 47% with recurring palmar dyshidrotic eczema. The questionnaire was shortened to a version containing 17 items grouped in six dimensions: effectiveness, convenience, impact on HRQL, medical follow-up, side effects, and general opinion. Cronbach's alpha coefficient reached a value of 0.9. The dimensions showed different degrees of correlation, and the scores had a normal distribution with an average of 58.4 points (SD = 18.01). Treatment satisfaction scores attained correlations between 0.003 and 0.222 with the HRQL measures, and showed higher correlations with the effectiveness (r = 0.41) and tolerability (0.22) measures, but very low correlation with compliance (r = 0.015). Significant differences were observed between some diagnoses and treatments. The shortened questionnaire proved to have good psychometric properties, providing excellent reliability, satisfactorily reproducing the proposed structure and supplying evidence of validity.
    Health and Quality of Life Outcomes 11/2010; 8:127. · 2.27 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Listening and paying attention to our patients is crucial for understanding a disease. A good example is Immediate Contact Skin Reactions (ICSR) which manifest as Contact Urticaria Syndrome (CUS), Contact Urticaria (CU) and Protein Contact Dermatitis (PCD). These entities are characterized by the immediate skin development of itchy flares, wheals, and/or dermatitis. All conditions usually appear within minutes of contact with various substances, including chemicals, animal products, antibiotics, cosmetics, and many other materials. From the clinical and diagnostic viewpoint, the patient's clinical report is critical to its description, definition and classification. Its pathogenesis still remains a challenge and our knowledge of the agents potentially responsible is slowly increasing over time, based on the descriptions of a few isolated cases. This text reviews the classic concepts, introduces new compounds responsible for these immediate skin reactions, and suggests further investigation.
    European journal of dermatology: EJD 01/2010; 20(5):552-62. · 1.95 Impact Factor
  • Aorn. 01/2010; 101(10):896-898.
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    ABSTRACT: The methyl ester form of fumaric acid named dimethyl fumarate (DMF) is an effective mould-growth inhibitor. Its irritating and sensitizing properties were demonstrated in animal models. Recently, DMF has been identified as responsible for furniture contact dermatitis in Europe. To describe the clinical manifestations, patch test results, shoe chemical analysis, and source of exposure to DMF-induced shoe contact dermatitis. Patients with suspected shoe contact dermatitis were studied in compliance with the Declaration of Helsinki. Patch test results obtained with their own shoe and the European baseline series, acrylates and fumaric acid esters (FAE), were recorded according to international guidelines. The content of DMF in shoes was analysed with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. Acute, immediate irritant contact dermatitis and non-immunological contact urticaria were observed in eight adults and two children, respectively. All the adult patients studied developed a delayed sensitization demonstrated by a positive patch testing to DMF < or = 0.1% in pet. Cross-reactivity with other FAEs and acrylates was observed. At least 12 different shoe brands were investigated. The chemical analysis from the available shoes showed the presence of DMF. DMF in shoes was responsible for severe contact dermatitis. Global preventive measures for avoiding contact with DMF are necessary.
    Contact Dermatitis 11/2009; 61(5):249-60. · 2.93 Impact Factor
  • C Laguna, V Zaragoza, J de la Cuadra
    Actas Dermo-Sifiliográficas 05/2009; 100(3):246-8.
  • C. Laguna, V. Zaragoza, J. de la Cuadra
    Actas Dermo-Sifiliográficas. 04/2009; 100(3).
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    ABSTRACT: IntroductionContact dermatitis to cosmetics is a common problem in the general population, although its prevalence appears to be underestimated. We reviewed cases of allergic contact dermatitis to cosmetics diagnosed in our dermatology department over a 7-year period with a view to identifying the allergens responsible, the frequency of occurrence of these allergens, and the cosmetic products implicated.
    Actas Dermo-Sifiliográficas. 02/2009; 100(1).
  • E Roche, J de la Cuadra, V Alegre
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    ABSTRACT: Allergic contact dermatitis due to acrylates present in the workplace is a disease frequently reported among dentists, printers, and fiberglass workers. Recently, the number of cases of contact allergic dermatitis among beauticians specialized in sculpting artificial nails has increased. Our objective was to study the clinical characteristics and allergens implicated in allergic contact dermatitis due to acrylates in beauticians and users of sculpted nails. This was an observational, retrospective study of patients diagnosed with allergic contact dermatitis due to acrylates used in sculpting artificial nails over the last 26 years in the Hospital General Universitario, Valencia, Spain. In total, 15 patients were diagnosed: 14 beauticians and 1 client. Most cases were diagnosed in the past 2 years. All were women, their mean age was 32.2 years, and 26.7 % had a personal or family history of atopy. The sensitization time varied between 1 month and 15 years. The most frequently affected areas were the fleshy parts of the fingers and hands. Three patients - 2 beauticians and 1 client - presented allergic asthma due to acrylates. All patients underwent patch testing with a standard battery of allergens and a battery of acrylates. The most frequent allergens were ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (13/15, 86.7 %), hydroxyethyl methacrylate (13/15, 86.7 %), triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (7/15, 46.7 %), 2-hydroxypropyl methacrylate (5/15, 33.3 %), and methyl methacrylate (5/15, 33.3 %). Acrylate monomers used for sculpting artificial nails are important sensitizers for contact and occupational dermatitis. The most important consideration is primary and secondary prevention.
    Actas Dermo-Sifiliográficas 01/2009; 99(10):788-94.
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    ABSTRACT: Contact dermatitis to cosmetics is a common problem in the general population, although its prevalence appears to be underestimated. We reviewed cases of allergic contact dermatitis to cosmetics diagnosed in our dermatology department over a 7-year period with a view to identifying the allergens responsible, the frequency of occurrence of these allergens, and the cosmetic products implicated. Using the database of the skin allergy department, we undertook a search of all cases of allergic contact dermatitis to cosmetics diagnosed in our department from January 2000 through October 2007. In this period, patch tests were carried out on 2,485 patients, of whom 740 were diagnosed with allergic contact dermatitis and the cause was cosmetics in 202 of these patients (170 women and 32 men), who accounted for 27.3 % of all cases. A total of 315 positive results were found for 46 different allergens. Allergens most often responsible for contact dermatitis in a cosmetics user were methylisothiazolinone (19 %), paraphenylenediamine (15.2 %), and fragrance mixtures (7.8 %). Acrylates were the most common allergens in cases of occupational disease. Half of the positive results were obtained with the standard battery of the Spanish Group for Research Into Dermatitis and Skin Allergies (GEIDAC). The cosmetic products most often implicated among cosmetics users were hair dyes (18.5 %), gels/soaps (15.7 %), and moisturizers (12.7 %). Most patients affected were women. Preservatives, paraphenylenediamine, and fragrances were the most frequently detected cosmetic allergens, in line with previous reports in the literature. Finally, in order to detect new cosmetic allergens, cooperation between physicians and cosmetics producers is needed.
    Actas Dermo-Sifiliográficas 01/2009; 100(1):53-60.
  • Value in Health 01/2009; 12(7). · 2.19 Impact Factor
  • E. Roche, J. de la Cuadra, V. Alegre
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    ABSTRACT: Background Allergic contact dermatitis due to acrylates present in the workplace is a disease frequently reported among dentists, printers, and fiberglass workers. Recently, the number of cases of contact allergic dermatitis among beauticians specialized in sculpting artificial nails has increased.
    Actas Dermo-Sifiliográficas. 12/2008; 99(10).

Publication Stats

274 Citations
77.39 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1987–2014
    • Consorcio Hospital General Universitario de Valencia
      • Departamento de Dermatología
      Valenza, Valencia, Spain
  • 2012
    • Instituto Valenciano de Oncologia
      Valenza, Valencia, Spain
  • 2009
    • Colegio Oficial de Médicos de Valencia
      Valenza, Valencia, Spain
  • 2008
    • Port of Spain General Hospital
      City of Port-of-Spain, City of Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago
  • 2006
    • Hospital Universitari Germans Trias i Pujol
      Badalona, Catalonia, Spain
  • 1997
    • Hospital Universitario Virgen de la Arrixaca
      • Departamento de Dermatología
      Murcia, Murcia, Spain
  • 1990
    • University of Valencia
      • Organic Chemistry
      Valenza, Valencia, Spain