Jeffrey A Jeddeloh

Iowa State University, Ames, IA, United States

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Publications (46)460.1 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) is a polyploid, outcrossing grass species native to North America and has recently been recognized as a potential biofuel feedstock crop. Significant phenotypic variation including ploidy is present across the two primary ecotypes of switchgrass, referred to as upland and lowland switchgrass. The tetraploid switchgrass genome is approximately 1400 Mbp, split between two subgenomes, with significant repetitive sequence content limiting the efficiency of re-sequencing approaches for determining genome diversity. To characterize genetic diversity in upland and lowland switchgrass as a first step in linking genotype to phenotype, we designed an exome capture probe set based on transcript assemblies that represent ~50 Mb of annotated switchgrass exome sequences. We then evaluated and optimized the probe set using solid phase comparative genome hybridization and liquid phase exome capture followed by next generation sequencing. Using the optimized probe set, we assessed variation in the exomes of eight switchgrass genotypes representing tetraploid lowland and octoploid upland cultivars to benchmark our exome capture probe set design. We identified ample variation in the switchgrass genome including 1,395,501 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), 8,173 putative copy number variants and 3,336 presence/absence variants. While the majority of the SNPs (84%) detected were biallelic, a substantial number were tri-allelic with limited occurrence of tetra-allelic polymorphisms consistent with the heterozygous and polyploid nature of the switchgrass genome. Collectively, these data demonstrate the efficacy of exome capture for discovery of genome variation in a polyploid species with a large, repetitive and heterozygous genome. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    The Plant Journal 06/2014; · 6.58 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We have used a sensitized ENU mutagenesis screen to produce mouse lines that carry mutations in genes required for epigenetic regulation. We call these lines Modifiers of murine metastable epialleles (Mommes). We report a basic molecular and phenotypic characterization for twenty of the Momme mouse lines, and in each case we also identify the causative mutation. Three of the lines carry a mutation in a novel epigenetic modifier, Rearranged L-myc fusion (Rlf), and one gene, Rap-interacting factor 1 (Rif1), has not previously been reported to be involved in transcriptional regulation in mammals. Many of the other lines are novel alleles of known epigenetic regulators. For two genes, Rlf and Widely-interspaced zinc finger (Wiz), we describe the first mouse mutants. All of the Momme mutants show some degree of homozygous embryonic lethality, emphasizing the importance of epigenetic processes. The penetrance of lethality is incomplete in a number of cases. Similarly, abnormalities in phenotype seen in the heterozygous individuals of some lines occur with incomplete penetrance. Recent advances in sequencing enhance the power of sensitized mutagenesis screens to identify the function of previously uncharacterized factors and to discover additional functions for previously characterized proteins. The observation of incomplete penetrance of phenotypes in these inbred mutant mice, at various stages of development, is of interest. Overall, the Momme collection of mouse mutants provides a valuable resource for researchers across many disciplines.
    Genome biology 09/2013; 14(9):R96. · 10.30 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Advanced resources for genome-assisted research in barley (Hordeum vulgare) including a whole genome shotgun assembly and an integrated physical map have recently become available. These have made studies that aim to assess genetic diversity or to isolate single genes possible by whole genome resequencing and in silico variant detection. However such an approach remains expensive given the 5 Gb size of the barley genome. Targeted sequencing of the mRNA-coding exome reduces barley genomic complexity more than 50-fold, thus dramatically reducing this heavy sequencing and analysis load. We have developed and employed an in-solution hybridization-based sequence capture platform to selectively enrich for a 61.6 megabase coding sequence target that includes predicted genes from the genome assembly of the cultivar Morex as well as publicly available full length cDNAs and de novo assembled RNAseq consensus sequence contigs. The platform provides a highly specific capture with substantial and reproducible enrichment of targeted exons both for cultivated barley and related species. We show that this exome capture platform provides a clear path towards a broader and deeper understanding of the natural variation residing in the mRNA-coding part of the barley genome and will thus constitute a valuable resource for applications such as mapping-by-sequencing and genetic diversity analyses. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    The Plant Journal 07/2013; · 6.58 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: There is growing evidence for the prevalence of copy number variation (CNV) and its role in phenotypic variation in many eukaryotic species. Here we use array comparative genomic hybridization to explore the extent of this type of structural variation in domesticated barley cultivars and wild barleys. RESULTS: A collection of 14 barley genotypes including eight cultivars and six wild barleys were used for comparative genomic hybridization. CNV affects 14.9% of all the sequences that were assessed. Higher levels of CNV diversity are present in the wild accessions relative to cultivated barley. CNVs are enriched near the ends of all chromosomes except 4H, which exhibits the lowest frequency of CNVs. CNV affects 9.5% of the coding sequences represented on the array and the genes affected by CNV are enriched for sequences annotated as disease-resistance proteins and protein kinases. Sequence-based comparisons of CNV between cultivars Barke and Morex provided evidence that DNA repair mechanisms of double-strand breaks via single-stranded annealing and synthesis-dependent strand annealing play an important role in the origin of CNV in barley. CONCLUSIONS: We present the first catalog of CNVs in a diploid Triticeae species, which opens the door for future genome diversity research in a tribe that comprises the economically important cereal species wheat, barley, and rye. Our findings constitute a valuable resource for the identification of CNV affecting genes of agronomic importance. We also identify potential mechanisms that can generate variation in copy number in plant genomes.
    Genome biology 06/2013; 14(6):R58. · 10.30 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: V(D)J recombination is essential for generating a diverse array of B and T cell receptors that can recognize and combat foreign antigens. As with any recombination event, tight control is essential to prevent the occurrence of genetic anomalies that drive cellular transformation. One important aspect of regulation is directed targeting of the RAG recombinase. Indeed, RAG accumulates at the 3' end of individual antigen receptor loci poised for rearrangement; however, it is not known whether focal binding is involved in regulating cleavage, and what mechanisms lead to enrichment of RAG in this region. Here, we show that monoallelic looping out of the 3' end of the T cell receptor α (Tcra) locus, coupled with transcription and increased chromatin/nuclear accessibility, is linked to focal RAG binding and ATM-mediated regulation of monoallelic cleavage on looped-out 3' regions. Our data identify higher-order loop formation as a key determinant of directed RAG targeting and the maintenance of genome stability.
    Cell Reports 02/2013; 3(2):359-70. · 7.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Targeted sequence capture is a promising technology in many areas in biology. These methods enable efficient and relatively inexpensive sequencing of hundreds to thousands of genes or genomic regions from many more individuals than is practical using whole-genome sequencing approaches. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of target enrichment using sequence capture in polyploid cotton. To capture and sequence both members of each gene pair (homeologs) of wild and domesticated Gossypium hirsutum, we created custom hybridization probes to target 1000 genes (500 pairs of homeologs) using information from the cotton transcriptome. Two widely divergent samples of G. hirsutum were hybridized to four custom NimbleGen capture arrays containing probes for targeted genes. We show that the two coresident homeologs in the allopolyploid nucleus were efficiently captured with high coverage. The capture efficiency was similar between the two accessions and independent of whether the samples were multiplexed. A significant amount of flanking, nontargeted sequence (untranslated regions and introns) was also captured and sequenced along with the targeted exons. Intraindividual heterozygosity is low in both wild and cultivated Upland cotton, as expected from the high level of inbreeding in natural G. hirsutum and bottlenecks accompanying domestication. In addition, levels of heterozygosity appeared asymmetrical with respect to genome (A(T) or D(T)) in cultivated cotton. The approach used here is general, scalable, and may be adapted for many different research inquiries involving polyploid plant genomes.
    G3-Genes Genomes Genetics 08/2012; 2(8):921-30. · 1.79 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A careful analysis of two maize recombinant inbred lines (RILs) relative to their inbred parents revealed the presence of several hundred apparently de novo copy number variants (CNVs). These changes in genome content were validated via both PCR and whole exome-array capture-and-sequencing experiments. One hundred and eighty-five genomic regions, which overlap with 38 high-confidence genes, exhibited apparently de novo copy number variation (CNV) in these two RILs and in many instances the same apparently de novo CNV events were observed in multiple RILs. Further analyses revealed that these recurrent apparently de novo CNVs were caused by segregation of single-copy homologous sequences that are located in non-allelic positions in the two parental inbred lines. F(1) individuals derived from these inbred lines will be hemizygous for each of these non-allelic homologs but RIL genotypes will contain these sequences at zero, one or two genomic loci. Hence, the segregation of non-allelic homologs may contribute to transgressive segregation. Indeed, statistical associations between phenotypic quantitative trait loci and genomic losses were observed for two of 14 tested pairs of non-allelic homologs.
    The Plant Journal 06/2012; · 6.58 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Bread wheat, Triticum aestivum, is an allohexaploid composed of the three distinct ancestral genomes, A, B and D. The polyploid nature of the wheat genome together with its large size has limited our ability to generate the significant amount of sequence data required for whole genome studies. Even with the advent of next-generation sequencing technology, it is still relatively expensive to generate whole genome sequences for more than a few wheat genomes at any one time. To overcome this problem, we have developed a targeted-capture re-sequencing protocol based upon NimbleGen array technology to capture and characterize 56.5 Mb of genomic DNA with sequence similarity to over 100 000 transcripts from eight different UK allohexaploid wheat varieties. Using this procedure in conjunction with a carefully designed bioinformatic procedure, we have identified more than 500 000 putative single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). While 80% of these were variants between the homoeologous genomes, A, B and D, a significant number (20%) were putative varietal SNPs between the eight varieties studied. A small number of these latter polymorphisms were experimentally validated using KASPar technology and 94% proved to be genuine. The procedures described here to sequence a large proportion of the wheat genome, and the various SNPs identified should be of considerable use to the wider wheat community.
    Plant Biotechnology Journal 06/2012; 10(6):733-42. · 6.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Genome-wide structural and gene content variations are hypothesized to drive important phenotypic variation within a species. Structural and gene content variations were assessed among four soybean (Glycine max) genotypes using array hybridization and targeted resequencing. Many chromosomes exhibited relatively low rates of structural variation (SV) among genotypes. However, several regions exhibited both copy number and presence-absence variation, the most prominent found on chromosomes 3, 6, 7, 16, and 18. Interestingly, the regions most enriched for SV were specifically localized to gene-rich regions that harbor clustered multigene families. The most abundant classes of gene families associated with these regions were the nucleotide-binding and receptor-like protein classes, both of which are important for plant biotic defense. The colocalization of SV with plant defense response signal transduction pathways provides insight into the mechanisms of soybean resistance gene evolution and may inform the development of new approaches to resistance gene cloning.
    Plant physiology 06/2012; 159(4):1295-308. · 6.56 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Retrotransposons are mobile genetic elements that use a germline 'copy-and-paste' mechanism to spread throughout metazoan genomes. At least 50 per cent of the human genome is derived from retrotransposons, with three active families (L1, Alu and SVA) associated with insertional mutagenesis and disease. Epigenetic and post-transcriptional suppression block retrotransposition in somatic cells, excluding early embryo development and some malignancies. Recent reports of L1 expression and copy number variation in the human brain suggest that L1 mobilization may also occur during later development. However, the corresponding integration sites have not been mapped. Here we apply a high-throughput method to identify numerous L1, Alu and SVA germline mutations, as well as 7,743 putative somatic L1 insertions, in the hippocampus and caudate nucleus of three individuals. Surprisingly, we also found 13,692 somatic Alu insertions and 1,350 SVA insertions. Our results demonstrate that retrotransposons mobilize to protein-coding genes differentially expressed and active in the brain. Thus, somatic genome mosaicism driven by retrotransposition may reshape the genetic circuitry that underpins normal and abnormal neurobiological processes.
    Nature 11/2011; 479(7374):534-7. · 38.60 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Transcriptomic analyses have revealed an unexpected complexity to the human transcriptome, whose breadth and depth exceeds current RNA sequencing capability. Using tiling arrays to target and sequence select portions of the transcriptome, we identify and characterize unannotated transcripts whose rare or transient expression is below the detection limits of conventional sequencing approaches. We use the unprecedented depth of coverage afforded by this technique to reach the deepest limits of the human transcriptome, exposing widespread, regulated and remarkably complex noncoding transcription in intergenic regions, as well as unannotated exons and splicing patterns in even intensively studied protein-coding loci such as p53 and HOX. The data also show that intermittent sequenced reads observed in conventional RNA sequencing data sets, previously dismissed as noise, are in fact indicative of unassembled rare transcripts. Collectively, these results reveal the range, depth and complexity of a human transcriptome that is far from fully characterized.
    Nature Biotechnology 11/2011; 30(1):99-104. · 32.44 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The ability to visualize specific DNA sequences, on chromosomes and in nuclei, by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is fundamental to many aspects of genetics, genomics and cell biology. Probe selection is currently limited by the availability of DNA clones or the appropriate pool of DNA sequences for PCR amplification. Here, we show that liquid-phase probe pools from sequence capture technology can be adapted to generate fluorescently labelled pools of oligonucleotides that are very effective as repeat-free FISH probes in mammalian cells. As well as detection of small (15 kb) and larger (100 kb) specific loci in both cultured cells and tissue sections, we show that complex oligonucleotide pools can be used as probes to visualize features of nuclear organization. Using this approach, we dramatically reveal the disposition of exons around the outside of a chromosome territory core and away from the nuclear periphery.
    Chromosome Research 10/2011; 19(7):901-9. · 2.85 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We report the development and optimization of reagents for in-solution, hybridization-based capture of the mouse exome. By validating this approach in a multiple inbred strains and in novel mutant strains, we show that whole exome sequencing is a robust approach for discovery of putative mutations, irrespective of strain background. We found strong candidate mutations for the majority of mutant exomes sequenced, including new models of orofacial clefting, urogenital dysmorphology, kyphosis and autoimmune hepatitis.
    Genome biology 09/2011; 12(9):R86. · 10.30 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Recombinant inbred lines developed from the maize (Zea mays ssp. mays) inbreds B73 and Mo17 have been widely used to discover quantitative trait loci controlling a wide variety of phenotypic traits and as a resource to produce high-resolution genetic maps. These two parents were used to produce a set of near-isogenic lines (NILs) with small regions of introgression into both backgrounds. A novel array-based genotyping platform was used to score genotypes of over 7,000 loci in 100 NILs with B73 as the recurrent parent and 50 NILs with Mo17 as the recurrent parent. This population contains introgressions that cover the majority of the maize genome. The set of NILs displayed an excess of residual heterozygosity relative to the amount expected based on their pedigrees, and this excess residual heterozygosity is enriched in the low-recombination regions near the centromeres. The genotyping platform provided the ability to survey copy number variants that exist in more copies in Mo17 than in B73. The majority of these Mo17-specific duplications are located in unlinked positions throughout the genome. The utility of this population for the discovery and validation of quantitative trait loci was assessed through analysis of plant height variation.
    Plant physiology 06/2011; 156(4):1679-90. · 6.56 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Mutagenized populations have become indispensable resources for introducing variation and studying gene function in plant genomics research. In this study, fast neutron (FN) radiation was used to induce deletion mutations in the soybean (Glycine max) genome. Approximately 120,000 soybean seeds were exposed to FN radiation doses of up to 32 Gray units to develop over 23,000 independent M2 lines. Here, we demonstrate the utility of this population for phenotypic screening and associated genomic characterization of striking and agronomically important traits. Plant variation was cataloged for seed composition, maturity, morphology, pigmentation, and nodulation traits. Mutants that showed significant increases or decreases in seed protein and oil content across multiple generations and environments were identified. The application of comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) to lesion-induced mutants for deletion mapping was validated on a midoleate x-ray mutant, M23, with a known FAD2-1A (for fatty acid desaturase) gene deletion. Using CGH, a subset of mutants was characterized, revealing deletion regions and candidate genes associated with phenotypes of interest. Exome resequencing and sequencing of PCR products confirmed FN-induced deletions detected by CGH. Beyond characterization of soybean FN mutants, this study demonstrates the utility of CGH, exome sequence capture, and next-generation sequencing approaches for analyses of mutant plant genomes. We present this FN mutant soybean population as a valuable public resource for future genetic screens and functional genomics research.
    Plant physiology 02/2011; 156(1):240-53. · 6.56 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Soybean (Glycine max) is a self-pollinating species that has relatively low nucleotide polymorphism rates compared with other crop species. Despite the low rate of nucleotide polymorphisms, a wide range of heritable phenotypic variation exists. There is even evidence for heritable phenotypic variation among individuals within some cultivars. Williams 82, the soybean cultivar used to produce the reference genome sequence, was derived from backcrossing a Phytophthora root rot resistance locus from the donor parent Kingwa into the recurrent parent Williams. To explore the genetic basis of intracultivar variation, we investigated the nucleotide, structural, and gene content variation of different Williams 82 individuals. Williams 82 individuals exhibited variation in the number and size of introgressed Kingwa loci. In these regions of genomic heterogeneity, the reference Williams 82 genome sequence consists of a mosaic of Williams and Kingwa haplotypes. Genomic structural variation between Williams and Kingwa was maintained between the Williams 82 individuals within the regions of heterogeneity. Additionally, the regions of heterogeneity exhibited gene content differences between Williams 82 individuals. These findings show that genetic heterogeneity in Williams 82 primarily originated from the differential segregation of polymorphic chromosomal regions following the backcross and single-seed descent generations of the breeding process. We conclude that soybean haplotypes can possess a high rate of structural and gene content variation, and the impact of intracultivar genetic heterogeneity may be significant. This detailed characterization will be useful for interpreting soybean genomic data sets and highlights important considerations for research communities that are developing or utilizing a reference genome sequence.
    Plant physiology 02/2011; 155(2):645-55. · 6.56 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Sequence capture technologies, pioneered in mammalian genomes, enable the resequencing of targeted genomic regions. Most capture protocols require blocking DNA, the production of which in large quantities can prove challenging. A blocker-free, two-stage capture protocol was developed using NimbleGen arrays. The first capture depletes the library of repetitive sequences, while the second enriches for target loci. This strategy was used to resequence non-repetitive portions of an approximately 2.2 Mb chromosomal interval and a set of 43 genes dispersed in the 2.3 Gb maize genome. This approach achieved approximately 1800-3000-fold enrichment and 80-98% coverage of targeted bases. More than 2500 SNPs were identified in target genes. Low rates of false-positive SNP predictions were obtained, even in the presence of captured paralogous sequences. Importantly, it was possible to recover novel sequences from non-reference alleles. The ability to design novel repeat-subtraction and target capture arrays makes this technology accessible in any species.
    The Plant Journal 03/2010; 62(5):898-909. · 6.58 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We have developed a solution-based method for targeted DNA capture-sequencing that is directed to the complete human exome. Using this approach allows the discovery of greater than 95% of all expected heterozygous singe base variants, requires as little as 3 Gbp of raw sequence data and constitutes an effective tool for identifying rare coding alleles in large scale genomic studies.
    Genome biology 01/2010; · 10.30 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We report an improved draft nucleotide sequence of the 2.3-gigabase genome of maize, an important crop plant and model for biological research. Over 32,000 genes were predicted, of which 99.8% were placed on reference chromosomes. Nearly 85% of the genome is composed of hundreds of families of transposable elements, dispersed nonuniformly across the genome. These were responsible for the capture and amplification of numerous gene fragments and affect the composition, sizes, and positions of centromeres. We also report on the correlation of methylation-poor regions with Mu transposon insertions and recombination, and copy number variants with insertions and/or deletions, as well as how uneven gene losses between duplicated regions were involved in returning an ancient allotetraploid to a genetically diploid state. These analyses inform and set the stage for further investigations to improve our understanding of the domestication and agricultural improvements of maize.
    Science 11/2009; 326(5956):1112-1115. · 31.20 Impact Factor
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    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We report an improved draft nucleotide sequence of the 2.3-gigabase genome of maize, an important crop plant and model for biological research. Over 32,000 genes were predicted, of which 99.8% were placed on reference chromosomes. Nearly 85% of the genome is composed of hundreds of families of transposable elements, dispersed nonuniformly across the genome. These were responsible for the capture and amplification of numerous gene fragments and affect the composition, sizes, and positions of centromeres. We also report on the correlation of methylation-poor regions with Mu transposon insertions and recombination, and copy number variants with insertions and/or deletions, as well as how uneven gene losses between duplicated regions were involved in returning an ancient allotetraploid to a genetically diploid state. These analyses inform and set the stage for further investigations to improve our understanding of the domestication and agricultural improvements of maize.
    Science 11/2009; 326(5956):1112-1115. · 31.20 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

4k Citations
460.10 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2009–2010
    • Iowa State University
      • Department of Agronomy
      Ames, IA, United States
    • University of Wisconsin–Madison
      Madison, Wisconsin, United States
    • University of Minnesota Morris
      Saint Paul, Minnesota, United States
  • 2008
    • Roche
      Bâle, Basel-City, Switzerland
  • 2005
    • University of Missouri - St. Louis
      Saint Louis, Michigan, United States
  • 2001–2004
    • United States Army Medical Research Institute for Infectious Diseases
      Maryland, United States
  • 1999–2003
    • U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases
      Maryland, United States
  • 1995–1999
    • Washington University in St. Louis
      • Department of Biology
      Saint Louis, MO, United States