Dane Winner

Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio, United States

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Publications (6)23.89 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: With twenty-nine individual antiretroviral drugs, from six classes, approved for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection, a combination of different phenotypic and genotypic tests is currently needed to monitor HIV-infected individuals. In this study, we have developed a novel HIV-1 genotypic assay based on deep sequencing (DEEPGEN™HIV) to simultaneously assess HIV-1 susceptibility to all drugs targeting the three viral enzymes as well as to predict HIV-1 coreceptor tropism. Patient-derived gag-p2/NCp7/p1/p6/pol-PR/RT/IN- and env-C2V3 PCR products were sequenced using the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine™. Reads spanning the 3' end of Gag, protease (PR), reverse transcriptase (RT), integrase (IN), and V3 regions were extracted, truncated, translated, and assembled for genotype and HIV-1 coreceptor tropism determination. DEEPGEN™HIV consistently detected both minority drug-resistant viruses and non-R5 HIV-1 variants from clinical specimens with viral loads ≥ 1,000 copies/ml, and from B and non-B subtypes. Additional mutations associated with resistance to PR, RT, and IN inhibitors, previously undetected by standard (Sanger) population sequencing, were reliably identified at frequencies as low as 1%. DEEPGEN™HIV correlated with phenotypic (original Trofile, 92%; ESTA, 80%; Trocai, 81%; and VERITROP, 80%) and genotypic (population sequencing/Geno2Pheno 10% FPR, 84%) HIV-1 tropism tests. DEEPGEN™HIV (83%) and Trofile (85%) showed similar concordance with clinical response following an 8-day maraviroc monotherapy (MCT). In summary, this novel all-inclusive HIV-1 genotypic and coreceptor tropism assay, based on deep sequencing of the PR, RT, IN, and V3 regions, permits the multiplex detection of low level drug-resistant and/or non-R5 viruses in up to 96 clinical samples simultaneously. This comprehensive test, the first of its class, will be instrumental in the development of new antiretroviral drugs and, more important, will aid in the treatment and management of HIV-infected individuals.
    Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy 01/2014; · 4.57 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The role of HIV-1 minority variants on transmission, pathogenesis, and virologic failure to antiretroviral regimens has been explored; however, most studies of low-level HIV-1 drug-resistant variants have focused in single target regions. Here we used a novel HIV-1 genotypic assay based on deep sequencing, DEEPGEN (Gibson et al 2014 Antimicrob Agents Chemother 58∶2167) to simultaneously analyze the presence of minority variants carrying mutations associated with reduced susceptibility to protease (PR), reverse transcriptase (RT), and integrase strand transfer integrase inhibitors (INSTIs), as well as HIV-1 coreceptor tropism. gag-p2/NCp7/p1/p6/pol-PR/RT/INT and env/C2V3 PCR products were obtained from twelve heavily treatment-experienced patients experiencing virologic failure while participating in a 48-week dose-ranging study of elvitegravir (GS-US-183-0105). Deep sequencing results were compared with (i) virological response to treatment, (ii) genotyping based on population sequencing, (iii) phenotyping data using PhenoSense and VIRALARTS, and (iv) HIV-1 coreceptor tropism based on the phenotypic test VERITROP. Most patients failed the antiretroviral regimen with numerous pre-existing mutations in the PR and RT, and additionally newly acquired INSTI-resistance mutations as determined by population sequencing (mean 9.4, 5.3, and 1.4 PI- RTI-, and INSTI-resistance mutations, respectively). Interestingly, since DEEPGEN allows the accurate detection of amino acid substitutions at frequencies as low as 1% of the population, a series of additional drug resistance mutations were detected by deep sequencing (mean 2.5, 1.5, and 0.9, respectively). The presence of these low-abundance HIV-1 variants was associated with drug susceptibility, replicative fitness, and coreceptor tropism determined using sensitive phenotypic assays, enhancing the overall burden of resistance to all four antiretroviral drug classes. Further longitudinal studies based on deep sequencing tests will help to clarify (i) the potential impact of minority HIV-1 drug resistant variants in response to antiretroviral therapy and (ii) the importance of the detection of HIV minority variants in the clinical practice.
    PLoS ONE 01/2014; 9(8):e104512. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: CCR5 antagonists are a powerful new class of antiretroviral drugs that requires a companion assay to evaluate the presence of CXCR4-tropic (non-R5) viruses prior to use in HIV-infected individuals. In this study we have developed, characterized, verified, and pre-validated a novel phenotypic test to determine HIV-1 coreceptor tropism (VERITROP) based on a sensitive cell-to-cell fusion assay. A proprietary vector was constructed containing a near-full length HIV-1 genome with the yeast uracil biosynthesis gene (URA3) replacing the HIV-1 env-coding sequence. Patient-derived HIV-1 PCR products were introduced by homologous recombination using an innovative yeast-based cloning strategy. The env-expressing vectors were then used in a cell-to-cell fusion assay to determine the presence of R5 and/or non-R5 HIV-1 variants within the viral population. Results were compared with (i) the original version of Trofile (Monogram Biosciences, San Francisco, CA), (ii) population sequencing, and (iii) 454 pyrosequencing, with the genotypic data analyzed using several bioinformatics tools, i.e., the 11/24/25 rule, Geno2Pheno (2%-5.75%, 3.5% or 10% FPR), and webPSSM. VERITROP consistently detected minority non-R5 variants from clinical specimens with an analytical sensitivity of 0.3%, with viral loads ≥1,000 copies/ml, and from B and non-B subtypes. In a pilot study, a 73.7% (56/76) concordance was observed with the original Trofile assay; with 19 of the 20 discordant results corresponding to non-R5 variants detected using VERITROP and not by the original Trofile assay. The degree of concordance of VERITROP and Trofile with population and deep sequencing results depended on the algorithm used to determine HIV-1 coreceptor tropism. Overall, VERITROP showed better concordance with deep sequencing/Geno2Pheno at 0.3% detection threshold (67%) whereas Trofile matched better with population sequencing (79%). However, 454 sequencing using Geno2Pheno 10% FPR, 0.3% threshold and VERITROP more accurately predicted the success of a maraviroc-based regimen. In conclusion, VERITROP may promote the development of new HIV coreceptor antagonists and aid in the treatment and management of HIV-infected individuals prior to and/or during treatment with this class of drugs.
    Journal of clinical microbiology 03/2013; · 4.16 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Most studies describing phenotypic resistance to integrase strand transfer inhibitors have analyzed viruses carrying only patient-derived HIV-1 integrase genes (INT-recombinant viruses). However, to date, many of the patients on INSTI-based treatment regimes, such as raltegravir (RAL), elvitegravir (EVG), and dolutegravir (DTG) are infected with multidrug-resistant HIV-1 strains. Here we analyzed the effect of drug resistance mutations in Gag (p2/NCp7/p1/p6), protease (PR), reverse transcriptase (RT), and integrase (IN) coding regions on susceptibility to INSTIs and viral replicative fitness using a novel HIV-1 phenotyping assay. Initial characterization based on site-directed mutant INSTI-resistant viruses confirmed the effect of a series of INSTI mutations on reduced susceptibility to EVG and RAL and viral replicative fitness (0.6% to 99% relative to the HIV-1NL4-3 control). Two sets of recombinant viruses containing a 3,428-bp gag-p2/NCp7/p1/p6/pol-PR/RT/IN (p2-INT) or a 1,088 bp integrase (INT) patient-derived fragment were constructed from plasma samples obtained from 27 virologic failure patients participating in a 48-week dose-ranging study of elvitegravir, GS-US-183-0105. A strong correlation was observed when susceptibility to EVG and RAL was assayed using p2-INT- vs. INT-recombinant viruses (Pearson coefficient correlation 0.869 and 0.918, P<0.0001 for EVG and RAL, respectively), demonstrating that mutations in the protease and RT have limited effect on susceptibility to these INSTIs. On the other hand, the replicative fitness of viruses harboring drug resistance mutations in PR, RT, and IN was generally impaired compared to viruses carrying only INSTI-resistance mutations. Thus, in the absence of drug pressure, drug resistance mutations in the PR and RT contribute to decrease the replicative fitness of the virus already impaired by mutations in the integrase. The use of recombinant viruses containing most or all HIV-1 regions targeted by antiretroviral drugs might be essential to understand the collective effect of epistatic interactions in multidrug-resistant viruses.
    PLoS ONE 01/2013; 8(6):e65631. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: HIV-1 coreceptor tropism assays are required to rule out the presence of CXCR4-tropic (non-R5) viruses prior treatment with CCR5 antagonists. Phenotypic (e.g., Trofile™, Monogram Biosciences) and genotypic (e.g., population sequencing linked to bioinformatic algorithms) assays are the most widely used. Although several next-generation sequencing (NGS) platforms are available, to date all published deep sequencing HIV-1 tropism studies have used the 454™ Life Sciences/Roche platform. In this study, HIV-1 co-receptor usage was predicted for twelve patients scheduled to start a maraviroc-based antiretroviral regimen. The V3 region of the HIV-1 env gene was sequenced using four NGS platforms: 454™, PacBio® RS (Pacific Biosciences), Illumina®, and Ion Torrent™ (Life Technologies). Cross-platform variation was evaluated, including number of reads, read length and error rates. HIV-1 tropism was inferred using Geno2Pheno, Web PSSM, and the 11/24/25 rule and compared with Trofile™ and virologic response to antiretroviral therapy. Error rates related to insertions/deletions (indels) and nucleotide substitutions introduced by the four NGS platforms were low compared to the actual HIV-1 sequence variation. Each platform detected all major virus variants within the HIV-1 population with similar frequencies. Identification of non-R5 viruses was comparable among the four platforms, with minor differences attributable to the algorithms used to infer HIV-1 tropism. All NGS platforms showed similar concordance with virologic response to the maraviroc-based regimen (75% to 80% range depending on the algorithm used), compared to Trofile (80%) and population sequencing (70%). In conclusion, all four NGS platforms were able to detect minority non-R5 variants at comparable levels suggesting that any NGS-based method can be used to predict HIV-1 coreceptor usage.
    PLoS ONE 01/2012; 7(11):e49602. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Twenty-six antiretroviral drugs (ARVs), targeting five different steps in the life cycle of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), have been approved for the treatment of HIV-1 infection. Accordingly, HIV-1 phenotypic assays based on common cloning technology currently employ three, or possibly four, different recombinant viruses. Here, we describe a system to assess HIV-1 resistance to all drugs targeting the three viral enzymes as well as viral assembly using a single patient-derived, chimeric virus. Patient-derived p2-INT (gag-p2/NCp7/p1/p6/pol-PR/RT/IN) products were PCR amplified as a single fragment (3,428 bp) or two overlapping fragments (1,657 bp and 2,002 bp) and then recombined into a vector containing a near-full-length HIV-1 genome with the Saccharomyces cerevisiae uracil biosynthesis gene (URA3) replacing the 3,428 bp p2-INT segment (Dudley et al., Biotechniques 46:458-467, 2009). P2-INT-recombinant viruses were employed in drug susceptibility assays to test the activity of protease (PI), nucleoside/nucleotide reverse transcriptase (NRTI), nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase (NNRTI), and integrase strand-transfer (INSTI) inhibitors. Using a single standardized test (ViralARTS HIV), this new technology permits the rapid and automated quantification of phenotypic resistance for all known and candidate antiretroviral drugs targeting all viral enzymes (PR, RT, including polymerase and RNase H activities, and IN), some of the current and potential assembly inhibitors, and any drug targeting Pol or Gag precursor cleavage sites (relevant for PI and maturation inhibitors) This novel assay may be instrumental (i) in the development and clinical assessment of novel ARV drugs and (ii) to monitor patients failing prior complex treatment regimens.
    Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy 05/2011; 55(8):3729-42. · 4.57 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

32 Citations
23.89 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2013–2014
    • Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine
      Cleveland, Ohio, United States
    • Ústav Organické Chemie a Biochemie AV ČR, v.v.i.
      Praha, Praha, Czech Republic
  • 2011–2013
    • Diagnostic Hybrids
      Athens, Ohio, United States
  • 2012
    • The University of Manchester
      • Faculty of Life Sciences
      Manchester, ENG, United Kingdom