Marco Beolchini

University of Havana, La Habana, Ciudad de La Habana, Cuba

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Publications (8)24.03 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to evaluate the healing of autologous bone block grafts or deproteinized bovine bone mineral (DBBM) block grafts applied concomitantly with collagen membranes for horizontal alveolar ridge augmentation.
    Clinical Oral Implants Research 06/2014; · 3.43 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To compare the hard tissue changes at implants installed applying edentulous ridge expansion (E.R.E.) at sites with a buccal bony wall thickness of 1 or 2 mm. In six Labrador dogs, the first and second maxillary incisors were extracted, and the buccal alveolar bony plates and septa were removed. After 3 months of healing, partial-thickness flaps were dissected, and the E.R.E. was applied bilaterally. Hence, an expansion of the buccal bony crest was obtained in both sides of the maxilla with a displacement of either a 1- or a 2-mm-wide buccal bony plate at the test and control sites, respectively. After 3 months of healing, biopsies were obtained for histological analyses. A buccal vertical resorption of the alveolar crest of 2.3 ± 0.8 and 2.1 ± 1.1 mm, and a coronal level of osseointegration at the buccal aspect of 2.7 ± 0.5 and 2.9 ± 0.9 mm were found at the test (1 mm) and control (2 mm) sites, respectively. The differences did not reach statistical significance. The mean values of the mineralized bone-to-implant contact (MBIC%) ranged from 62% to 73% at the buccal and lingual sites. No statistically significant differences were found. Horizontal volume gains of 1.8 and 1.1 mm were observed at the test and control sites, respectively, and the difference being statistically significant. Implants installed using the E.R.E. technique yielded a high degree of osseointegration. It is suggested that the displacement of buccal bony plates of 1 mm thickness is preferable compared with that of wider dimensions.
    Clinical Oral Implants Research 12/2013; · 3.43 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To compare the healing and bony crest resorption at implants installed conventionally or applying an edentulous ridge expansion (ERE) technique in the maxilla. In six Labrador dogs, the first and second maxillary incisors were extracted bilaterally. In the left side of the maxilla (Test), the flaps were elevated and the buccal plate of the alveoli and septa was removed. After 3 months of healing, partial-thickness (split) flaps were dissected and the residual alveolar bone was exposed. In the right side of the maxilla, an implant was installed conventionally (Type IV; Control) while, in the left side, the ERE technique was adopted. Hence, an expansion of the buccal bony crest was obtained, and the implant was subsequently installed (Test). After 3 months of healing, biopsies were obtained and ground sections were prepared for histological analyses. A buccal vertical resorption of the bony crest of 2.2 ± 1.2 mm and 1.6 ± 0.7 mm was found at the test and control sites, respectively. The difference, however, did not reach statistical significance. The coronal level of osseointegration at the buccal aspect was located at 3.1 ± 1.0 mm and 2.2 ± 0.7 mm from the implant shoulder at the test and control sites, respectively, the difference being statistically significant. The mean values of the mineralized bone-to-implant contact (MBIC%) ranged from 43% to 48% at the buccal and lingual sites. No differences reached statistical significance. Implants installed by applying an ERE technique may osseointegrate similarly to conventional implant installation. However, vertical and horizontal resorption of the displaced buccal bony wall occurred as well.
    Clinical Oral Implants Research 09/2013; · 3.43 Impact Factor
  • M. Beolchini, S. Lilliu, P. Faria, D. Botticelli
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    ABSTRACT: Aim: To describe the adaptation of the Edentulous Ridge Expansion (E.R.E.) technique for implant removal.Material and Methods: The E.R.E. technique for the removal of failed implants is described in detail. A clinical case is also reported. In a patient carrying a full arch removable prosthesis in the upper jaw, sustained by two bars, two out of five implants were found to be fractured. Bucco-lingual partial-thickness flaps were used to access the fractured implants. The implants were subsequently removed applying the E.R.E. technique. Two recipient sites were prepared in the same position, using bone expanders, and two new implants were installed.Results: After 4 months of healing, the implants were integrated and a new bar was fabricated, and the old prosthesis readapted.Conclusion: The ERE technique may be successfully applied for the removal of failed implants, and the immediate or delayed reinstallation of new implants.
    Oral Surgery 05/2012; 5(2).
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    ABSTRACT: AIM: To evaluate the integration of implants installed at the interface of pristine and grafted tissue augmented with particulate autologous bone or deproteinized bovine bone mineral (DBBM), concomitantly with a collagen membrane. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In 6 Labrador dogs, the distal root of (3) P(3) and (4) P(4) was endodontically treated and hemi-sected, and the mesial roots extracted concomitantly with the extraction of (2) P(2) . The buccal bony walls were removed, and two box-shaped defects, one larger and one smaller, were created. After 3 months, flaps were elevated, and the defects were filled with particulate autologous bone or DBBM in the right and left side of the mandible, respectively. Collagen membranes were used to cover the grafted areas. Three months later, flaps were elevated, and a customized device was used as surgical guide to prepare the recipient sites at the interface between grafts and pristine bone. One implant was installed in each of the four defects. After 3 months, biopsies were harvested and ground sections prepared for histological evaluation. RESULTS: The augmentation technique was effective at all sites and all the foreseen implants were installed. In the histological analysis, all implants were integrated in mature bone, at both the buccal and lingual aspects. The most coronal bone-to-implant contact and the top of the buccal bony crest were located at a similar distance between test and control implants. However, these distances were higher at the larger compared with the smaller defects. Especially in the large defect, residual particles of DBBM were found embedded into connective tissue and located outside the bony crest. CONCLUSIONS: Particulate autologous bone as well as DBBM particles used to augment horizontally the alveolar bony process allowed for the osseointegration of implants installed after 3 months of healing.
    Clinical Oral Implants Research 04/2012; · 3.43 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the effect of mismatching abutments on implants with a wider platform on the peri-implant hard tissue remodeling and the soft tissue dimensions. Mandibular premolars and first molars of six Labrador dogs were extracted bilaterally. After 3 months of healing, one tapered implant was installed on each side of the mandibular molar region with the implant shoulder placed at the level of the buccal alveolar bony crest. On the right side of the mandible, an abutment of reduced diameter in relation to the platform of the implant was used, creating a mismatch of 0.85 mm (test), whereas an abutment of the same diameter of the implant platform was affixed in the left side of the mandible (control). The flaps were sutured to allow a non-submerged healing. After 4 months, the animals were sacrificed and ground sections were obtained for histometric assessment. All implants were completely osseo-integrated. Bone levels were superior at the test than at the control sites. However, statistically significant differences were found only at the buccal and proximal aspects. The soft tissue vertical dimension was higher at the control compared with the test sites. However, statistically significant differences were demonstrated only at the buccal aspects. A mismatch of 0.85 mm between the implant and the abutment yielded more coronal levels of bone-to-implant contact and a reduced height of the peri-implant soft tissue (biologic width), especially at the buccal aspect, if the implant shoulder was placed flush with the level of the buccal alveolar bony crest.
    Clinical Oral Implants Research 11/2011; 23(3):334-9. · 3.43 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the soft tissue and the dimensional changes of the alveolar bony crest at sites where deproteinized bovine bone mineral (DBBM) particles, concomitantly with the placement of a collagen membrane, were used at implants installed into sockets immediately after tooth extraction. The pulp tissue of the mesial roots of (3) P(3) was removed in six Labrador dogs, and the root canals were filled. Flaps were elevated bilaterally, the premolars hemi-sectioned, and the distal roots removed. Recipient sites were prepared in the distal alveolus, and implants were placed. At the test sites, DBBM particles were placed in the residual marginal defects concomitantly with the placement of a collagen membrane. No treatment augmentation was performed at the control sites. A non-submerged healing was allowed. Impressions were obtained at baseline and at the time of sacrifice performed 4 months after surgery. The cast models obtained were analyzed using an optical system to evaluate dimensional variations. Block sections of the implant sites were obtained for histological processing and soft tissue assessments. After 4 months of healing, no differences in soft tissue dimensions were found between the test and control sites based on the histological assessments. The location of the soft tissue at the buccal aspect was, however, more coronal at the test compared with the control sites (1.8 ± 0.8 and 0.9 ± 0.8 mm, respectively). At the three-dimensional evaluation, the margin of the soft tissues at the buccal aspect appeared to be located more apically and lingually. The vertical dislocation was 1 ± 0.6 and 2.7 ± 0.5 mm at the test and control sites, respectively. The area of the buccal shrinkage of the alveolar crest was significantly smaller at the test sites (5.9 ± 2.4 mm(2) ) compared with the control sites (11.5 ± 1.7 mm(2) ). The use of DBBM particles concomitantly with the application of a collagen membrane used at implants placed into sockets immediately after tooth extraction contributed to the preservation of the alveolar process.
    Clinical Oral Implants Research 10/2011; 23(7):789-96. · 3.43 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To compare the influence of autologous or deproteinized bovine bone mineral as grafting material on healing of buccal dehiscence defects at implants installed immediately into the maxillary second incisor extraction socket in dogs. In the maxillary second incisor sockets of 12 Labrador dogs, implants were installed immediately following tooth extraction. A standardized buccal defect was created and autologous bone particles or deproteinized bovine bone mineral were used to fill the defects. A collagen membrane was placed to cover the graft material, and the flaps were sutured to fully submerge the experimental areas. Six animals were sacrificed after 2 months, and six after 4 months of healing. Ground sections were obtained for histological evaluation. After 2 months of healing, all implants were osseointegrated. All buccal dehiscence defects were completely filled after 2 months irrespective of the augmentation material (autologous bone or Bio-Oss(®)) applied. Bone-to-implant contact (BIC) on the denuded implant surfaces was within a normal range of 30-40%. However, the newly formed tissue at 2 months was partially resorbed (>50% of the area measurements) after 4 months. Applying either autologous bone or deproteinized bovine bone mineral to dehiscences at implants installed immediately into extraction sockets resulted in high degree of regeneration of the defects with satisfactory BIC on the denuded implant surface.
    Clinical Oral Implants Research 04/2011; 22(4):430-7. · 3.43 Impact Factor