Ioannis Verginadis

University of Ioannina, Ioánnina, Ipeiros, Greece

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Publications (11)8.52 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: A systematic review concerning ectopic pregnancy and assisted reproductive technologies.
    Ectopic Pregnancy - Modern Diagnosis and Nanagement Edited by Michael Kamrava; Publisher INTECH open -beta-. 01/2020; Monography book:45-78.
  • 65th Annual Meeting of the European Federation of Animal Science,, Copenhagen, Denmark,; 08/2014
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    ABSTRACT: Since the initial success of cisplatin, metal complexes and organometallic compounds have been gaining growing interest in cancer therapy. It is well known that organotin(IV) compounds display strong biological activity. The triorganotin compound [(C(6)H(5))(3)Sn(cmbzt)] (cmbzt=5-chloro-2-mercaptobenzothiazole) (SnCMB), was tested for its antiproliferative and antitumour activities. Two sets of experimental procedures were followed: (1) In vitro and ex vivo procedures included the study of the cytotoxic activity of the complex against leiomyosarcoma cells (LMS) and on a normal human fibroblast line (MRC5) by the MTT assay (cell proliferation), colony formation efficiency and flow cytometric analysis with Annexin V-FITC. The anticoagulation properties of the complex were also studied. (2) In vivo procedures included acute toxicity studies and finally administration of the complex to tumour bearing Wistar rats. The results showed that the complex exhibited potent cytotoxic activity (LMS IC(50)=155 nM) and induced significant apoptosis against LMS cells. Acute toxicity studies on Wistar rats presented kidney and liver toxicity at a single dose of 40 mg/kg body wt. Furthermore, antitumour activity studies on sarcoma bearing Wistar rats revealed that SnCMB complex, administrated in two different therapeutic schemes (treated with 4 × 2 mg/kg body wt every 5 days and 3 × 2.67 mg/kg body wt every 10 days of SnCMB complex), prolonged mean survival time (by 50% and 70% respectively), but failed to decrease the mean tumour growth rate (MTGR) compared to the control group (p<0.01). In conclusion, the organic complex SnCMB possess potent cytotoxic and antimetastatic effects, and low toxicity introducing it as possible successor of organometallic compounds used nowadays in chemotherapy.
    European journal of pharmaceutical sciences: official journal of the European Federation for Pharmaceutical Sciences 07/2012; 47(2):490-6. · 2.61 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose – Kefir is a probiotic grown with milk, with a slightly sour flavor and has been consumed for thousands of years. Kefir grains contain bacteria and yeast. In the past, kefir was administrated as a drug against tuberculosis, cancer and gastrointestinal disorders. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the potential anticancer properties of kefir and its ability to affect natural killer cells' (NKCs') activity. Design/methodology/approach – The assay of cytotoxic activity of NKCs by cytometric analysis was used, which included four stages: isolation of natural killers; quantification of target cells; incubation of natural killers with target cells at ratios of 12.5:1, 25:1 and 50:1 in CO2 incubator; and measurement of cells with flow cytometer. The same procedures were repeated, but the third stage was modified with the addition and incubation of 50, 75, and 100?µL kefir (of 24 hour culture with 3.5 per cent fresh milk) with K562 and leiomyosarcoma cells lines, and kefir and NK cells with K562 or LMS cell lines. Findings – The results showed that kefir's cytotoxic activity without the presence of NKCs reached an average of 85 per cent in both cell lines. With the addition of NK cells in kefir, the cytotoxic activity further increased by 10 per cent. Kefir alone did not cause any statistically significant death in NK cells. Kefir seems to have significant cytotoxic action by itself without stimulating NK cells in a significant manner. However, further studies are needed to establish the role of kefir in the prevention and treatment of neoplasmatic diseases. Originality/value – The paper provides information and new data, for nutritionists and clinical dietitians, about the effects of kefir in the prevention of cancer.
    Nutrition & Food Science 07/2012; 42(4):261-270.
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    06/2012: pages 249-268; , ISBN: 978-953-51-0639-5
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    ABSTRACT: There is significant scientific investigation taking place into the function and the mechanisms of action of natural killer (NK) cells (NKCs). Many plant extracts and vitamin supplements may play an immunoregulatory role by stimulating the functionality of the NKCs. The present study was designed to evaluate the in vitro and in vivo effects of vitamin C and Aloe vera juice on NK activity. In the in vitro experiments the activity of various concentrations of vitamin C (ranging from 3 × 10−3 M to 3 × 10−9 M) and Aloe vera juice (50 μl) were examined in the modulation of the NKCs functionality, taken from blood samples collected from 12 healthy volunteers. The in vivo experiments were performed on 15 healthy volunteers, who took supplements of a combination of 1 g/day of vitamin C and 50 ml of Aloe vera juice for 45 consecutive days. The in vitro results showed that both substances increased NKC cytotoxicity against K562 cancer cell line. Furthermore, in the in vivo experiment the cytotoxicity of the NK was significantly increased compared to the pre-supplementation values (p < 0.05) under all three conditions tested. These results indicate that vitamin C and Aloe vera juice can modulate NK cells cytotoxicity and has the potential to enhance the immune system.
    Journal of Herbal Medicine. 06/2012; 2(2):29–33.
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    10/2011; , ISBN: 978-953-307-648-5
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    ABSTRACT: Benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) has been treated with various types of electromagnetic radiation methods such as transurethral needle ablation (TUNA), interstitial laser therapy (ILC), holmium laser resection (HoLRP). In the present study, the effects of a noninvasive method based on the exposure of patients with BPH to a pulsative EM Field at radiofrequencies have been investigated. Twenty patients with BPH, aging 68-78 years old (y.o), were enrolled in the study. Patients were randomly divided into two groups: the treatment group (10 patients, 74.0 ± 5.7 y.o) treated with the α-blocker Alfusosin, 10 mg/24 h for at least 4 weeks, and the electromagnetic group (10 patients, 73.7 ± 6.3 y.o) exposed for 2 weeks in a very short wave duration, pulsed electromagnetic field at radiofrequencies generated by an ion magnetic inductor, for 30 min daily, 5 consecutive days per week. Patients of both groups were evaluated before and after drug and EMF treatment by values of total PSA and prostatic PSA fraction, acid phosphate, U/S estimation of prostate volume and urine residue, urodynamic estimation of urine flow rate, and International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS). There was a statistically significant decrease before and after treatment of IPSS (P < 0.02), U/S prostate volume (P < 0.05), and urine residue (P < 0.05), as well as of mean urine flow rate (P < 0.05) in patients of the electromagnetic group, in contrast to the treatment group who had only improved IPSS (P < 0.05). There was also a significant improvement in clinical symptoms in patients of the electromagnetic group. Follow-up of the patients of this group for one year revealed that results obtained by EMFs treatment are still remaining. Pulsed electromagnetic field at radiofrequencies may benefit patients with benign prostate hyperplasia treated by a non-invasive method.
    International Urology and Nephrology 05/2011; 43(4):955-60. · 1.33 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Nowadays, investigation for possible therapeutic applications of various metal-based drugs attracts the scientific interest worldwide. The triorganotin compound bis[triphenyltin(IV)](3-carboxy-pyridine-2-thionato) (SnMNA), was tested for its anti-proliferative and antitumor activities. Cytotoxic activity was assessed by Trypan blue and 3-(4.5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2.5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay (MTT). SnMNA exhibited potent cytotoxic effects against leiomyosarcoma cells (LMS) and human breast adenocarcinoma cells (MCF-7), which is 200 times stronger than that of cisplatin. Moreover, SnMNA induced significant apoptosis in LMS and MCF-7 cells characterized by flow cytometry analysis and DNA fragmentation. Acute and chronic toxicity studies on Wistar rats caused kidney and lung toxicity at a single dose of 80mg/kgBody Weight (BW) or four repeated doses of 8mg/kgBW once per week. Furthermore, antitumor activity studies on sarcoma bearing Wistar rats revealed that SnMNA complex at four repeated doses of 5.4mg/kgBW every three days prolonged mean survival time of the animal at 200% and decreased mean tumor growth rate (MTGR) compared to the control group (p<0.05). It is noteworthy to mention that the 30% (3 out of 10) of the bearing animals were totally cured. These findings indicate that SnMNA might be a promising new antitumor agent.
    European journal of pharmaceutical sciences: official journal of the European Federation for Pharmaceutical Sciences 02/2011; 42(3):253-61. · 2.61 Impact Factor
  • Electromagnetic Biology and Medicine 01/2011; · 0.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The synthesis and characterization of the silver(I) chloride complex of formula {[AgCI(CMBZT)(TPTP)(2)] . (MeOH)} (1) (CMBZT = 5-chloro-2-mercaptobenzothiazole, TPTP = tris(p-tolyl)phosphine) is described. Also the structure of the hydrate derivative {[AgCI(TPTP)(3)] . (0.5 . H(2)O)} (2) of the corresponding known anhydrous silver complex (Zartilas et al., 2009), and the polymorph 3 of the known [AgI(TPTP)(3)] complex (Zartilas et al., 2009) were determined and compared with the known ones. In addition, the structure of the known one silver(I) cluster {[AgI(TPTP)](4)} (4) (Meijboom et al., 2009) was re-determined at 120(2) K and possible Ag-Ag interactions were analyzed. The compounds 1-4 were characterized by X-ray crystallography at r.t (1) and 120 K (2-4). All these complexes and {[(Et(3)NH)(+)](2) . [Ag(6)(mu(3)-Hmna)(4)(mu(3)-mna)(2)](2-) . (DMSO)(2) . (H(2)O)} (5) (Hmna = 2-mercaptonicotinic acid) were evaluated for cytotoxic and anti-inflammatory activity. The in vitro testing of cytotoxic activity of 1-5 against leiomyosarcoma cancer cells (LMS), were evaluated with Trypan Blue and Thiazolyl Blue Tetrazolium Bromide or 3-(4.5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2.5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assays. The flow cytometry assay for complex 1 and showed that at 15 muM of 1, 62.38% of LMS cells undergo apoptosis, while 7% of LMS cells undergo cell necrosis. The antitumor activity of 3 is comparable with that of its reported polymorph (Zartilas et al., 2009). The anti-inflammatory, activity of complexes 1-3 and 5 was also studied. The activity towards cell viability was 2 > 3 > 5 > 1 > 4, while the order of the inhibitory activity in cell growth proliferation follows the order, 2 > 3 > 1 > 4 > 5. The anti-inflammatory activity on the other hand is 1 > 2 > 5 > cdots, three dots, centered >3.
    Bioinorganic Chemistry and Applications 01/2010; · 1.17 Impact Factor