Henk van den Berg

Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Maryland, United States

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Publications (19)106.92 Total impact

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    Henk van den Berg, Louise A Kelly-Hope, Steve W Lindsay
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    ABSTRACT: The global programmes to eliminate both malaria and lymphatic filariasis are facing operational and technical challenges. Available data show that the use of treated or untreated bednets and indoor residual spraying for malaria control concomitantly reduced filarial rates. In turn, mass drug administration campaigns against lymphatic filariasis can be combined with the distribution of insecticide-treated bednets. Combining these disease control efforts could lead to more efficient use of resources, more accurate attribution of effects, and more effective control of both diseases. Systematic integration requires coordination at all levels, mapping of coendemic areas, and comprehensive monitoring and evaluation.
    The Lancet Infectious Diseases 10/2012; · 19.97 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Analysis is lacking on the management of vector control systems in disease-endemic countries with respect to the efficiency and sustainability of operations. Three locations were selected, at the scale of province, municipality and barangay (i.e. village). Data on disease incidence, programme activities, and programme management were collected on-site through meetings and focus group discussions. Adaptation of disease control strategies to the epidemiological situation per barangay, through micro-stratification, brings gains in efficiency, but should be accompanied by further capacity building on local situational analysis for better selection and targeting of vector control interventions within the barangay. An integrated approach to vector control, aiming to improve the rational use of resources, was evident with a multi-disease strategy for detection and response, and by the use of combinations of vector control methods. Collaboration within the health sector was apparent from the involvement of barangay health workers, re-orientation of job descriptions and the creation of a disease surveillance unit. The engagement of barangay leaders and use of existing community structures helped mobilize local resources and voluntary services for vector control. In one location, local authorities and the community were involved in the planning, implementation and evaluation of malaria control, which triggered local programme ownership. Strategies that contributed to an improved efficiency and sustainability of vector control operations were: micro-stratification, integration of vector control within the health sector, a multi-disease approach, involvement of local authorities, and empowerment of communities. Capacity building on situational analysis and vector surveillance should be addressed through national policy and guidelines.
    Malaria Journal 08/2012; 11:269. · 3.40 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Willem Takken and colleagues argue for the expansion of insecticide monotherapy in malaria control by taking lessons from agriculture and including more sustainable integrated vector management strategies.
    PLoS Medicine 07/2012; 9(7):e1001262. · 15.25 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Data on insecticide use for vector control are essential for guiding pesticide management systems on judicious and appropriate use, resistance management, and reduction of risks to human health and the environment. We studied the global use and trends of insecticide use for control of vector-borne diseases for the period 2000 through 2009. A survey was distributed to countries with vector control programs to request national data on vector control insecticide use, excluding the use of long-lasting insecticidal nets (LNs). Data were received from 125 countries, representing 97% of the human populations of 143 targeted countries. The main disease targeted with insecticides was malaria, followed by dengue, leishmaniasis, and Chagas disease. The use of vector control insecticides was dominated by organochlorines [i.e., DDT (dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane)] in terms of quantity applied (71% of total) and by pyrethroids in terms of the surface or area covered (81% of total). Global use of DDT for vector control, most of which was in India alone, was fairly constant during 2000 through 2009. In Africa, pyrethroid use increased in countries that also achieved high coverage for LNs, and DDT increased sharply until 2008 but dropped in 2009. The global use of DDT has not changed substantially since the Stockholm Convention went into effect. The dominance of pyrethroid use has major implications because of the spread of insecticide resistance with the potential to reduce the efficacy of LNs. Managing insecticide resistance should be coordinated between disease-specific programs and sectors of public health and agriculture within the context of an integrated vector management approach.
    Environmental Health Perspectives 01/2012; 120(4):577-82. · 7.26 Impact Factor
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    Henk Bouwman, Henk van den Berg, Henrik Kylin
    Environmental Health Perspectives 10/2011; 119(10):a424-5. · 7.26 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Legislation and regulation of pesticides used in public health are essential for reducing risks to human health and the environment.Objective: We assessed the global situation on legislation and regulatory control of public health pesticides. A peer-reviewed and field-tested questionnaire was distributed to 142 member states of the World Health Organization (WHO); 113 states completed the questionnaire. Legislation on public health pesticides was absent in 25% of the countries. Where present, legislation often lacked comprehensiveness, for example, on basic aspects such as labeling, storage, transport, and disposal of public health pesticides. Guidelines or essential requirements for the process of pesticide registration were lacking in many countries. The capacity to enforce regulations was considered to be weak across WHO regions. Half of all countries lacked pesticide quality control laboratories, and two-thirds reported high concern over quality of products on the market. National statistics on production and trade of pesticides and poisoning incidents were lacking in many countries. Despite the shortcomings, WHO recommendations were considered to constitute a supportive or sole basis in national registration. Also, some regions showed high participation of countries in regional schemes to harmonize pesticide registration requirements. Critical deficiencies are evident in the legislative and regulatory framework for public health pesticides across regions, posing risks to human health and the environment. Recent experience in some countries with situational analysis, needs assessment, action planning, and regional collaboration has signaled a promising way forward.
    Environmental Health Perspectives 07/2011; 119(11):1517-22. · 7.26 Impact Factor
  • Henk van den Berg
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    ABSTRACT: In this article I reviewed the status of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), used for disease vector control, and its benefits and risks in relation to the available alternatives. Contemporary data on DDT use were obtained from questionnaires and reports as well as a Scopus search to retrieve published articles. Nearly 14 countries use DDT for disease control, and several others are reintroducing DDT. Concerns about the continued use of DDT are fueled by recent reports of high levels of human exposure associated with indoor spraying amid accumulating evidence on chronic health effects. There are signs that more malaria vectors are becoming resistant to the toxic action of DDT. Effective chemical methods are available as immediate alternatives to DDT, but the development of resistance is undermining the efficacy of insecticidal tools. Nonchemical methods are potentially important, but their effectiveness at program level needs urgent study. To reduce reliance on DDT, support is needed for integrated and multipartner strategies of vector control. Integrated vector management provides a framework for developing and implementing effective technologies and strategies as sustainable alternatives to reliance on DDT.
    Ciencia & saude coletiva 02/2011; 16(2):575-90.
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    Henk van den Berg
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    ABSTRACT: In this article I reviewed the status of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), used for disease vector control, and its benefits and risks in relation to the available alternatives. Contemporary data on DDT use were obtained from questionnaires and reports as well as a Scopus search to retrieve published articles. Nearly 14 countries use DDT for disease control, and several others are reintroducing DDT. Concerns about the continued use of DDT are fueled by recent reports of high levels of human exposure associated with indoor spraying amid accumulating evidence on chronic health effects. There are signs that more malaria vectors are becoming resistant to the toxic action of DDT. Effective chemical methods are available as immediate alternatives to DDT, but the development of resistance is undermining the efficacy of insecticidal tools. Nonchemical methods are potentially important, but their effectiveness at program level needs urgent study. To reduce reliance on DDT, support is needed for integrated and multipartner strategies of vector control. Integrated vector management provides a framework for developing and implementing effective technologies and strategies as sustainable alternatives to reliance on DDT.
    Ciência & Saúde Coletiva 02/2011; 16(2):575-590. · 0.40 Impact Factor
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    Hindrik Bouwman, Henk van den Berg, Henrik Kylin
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    ABSTRACT: The debate regarding dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) in malaria prevention and human health is polarized and can be classified into three positions: anti-DDT, centrist-DDT, pro-DDT. We attempted to arrive at a synthesis by matching a series of questions on the use of DDT for indoor residual spraying (IRS) with literature and insights, and to identify options and opportunities. Overall, community health is significantly improved through all available malaria control measures, which include IRS with DDT. Is DDT "good"? Yes, because it has saved many lives. Is DDT safe as used in IRS? Recent publications have increasingly raised concerns about the health implications of DDT. Therefore, an unqualified statement that DDT used in IRS is safe is untenable. Are inhabitants and applicators exposed? Yes, and to high levels. Should DDT be used? The fact that DDT is "good" because it saves lives, and "not safe" because it has health and environmental consequences, raises ethical issues. The evidence of adverse human health effects due to DDT is mounting. However, under certain circumstances, malaria control using DDT cannot yet be halted. Therefore, the continued use of DDT poses a paradox recognized by a centrist-DDT position. At the very least, it is now time to invoke precaution. Precautionary actions could include use and exposure reduction. There are situations where DDT will provide the best achievable health benefit, but maintaining that DDT is safe ignores the cumulative indications of many studies. In such situations, addressing the paradox from a centrist-DDT position and invoking precaution will help design choices for healthier lives.
    Environmental Health Perspectives 01/2011; 119(6):744-7. · 7.26 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: It is critical that vector control pesticides are used for their acceptable purpose without causing adverse effects on health and the environment. This paper provides a global overview of the current status of pesticides management in the practice of vector control. A questionnaire was distributed to WHO member states and completed either by the director of the vector-borne disease control programme or by the national manager for vector control. In all, 113 countries responded to the questionnaire (80% response rate), representing 94% of the total population of the countries targeted. Major gaps were evident in countries in pesticide procurement practices, training on vector control decision making, certification and quality control of pesticide application, monitoring of worker safety, public awareness programmes, and safe disposal of pesticide-related waste. Nevertheless, basic conditions of policy and coordination have been established in many countries through which the management of vector control pesticides could potentially be improved. Most countries responded that they have adopted relevant recommendations by the WHO. Given the deficiencies identified in this first global survey on public health pesticide management and the recent rise in pesticide use for malaria control, the effectiveness and safety of pesticide use are being compromised. This highlights the urgent need for countries to strengthen their capacity on pesticide management and evidence-based decision making within the context of an integrated vector management approach.
    Malaria Journal 01/2011; 10:125. · 3.40 Impact Factor
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    Henk van den Berg
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    ABSTRACT: I review the status of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), used for disease vector control, along with current evidence on its benefits and risks in relation to the available alternatives. Contemporary data on DDT use were largely obtained from questionnaires and reports. I also conducted a Scopus search to retrieve published articles. DDT has been recommended as part of the arsenal of insecticides available for indoor residual spraying until suitable alternatives are available. Approximately 14 countries use DDT for disease control, and several countries are preparing to reintroduce DDT. The effectiveness of DDT depends on local settings and merits close consideration in relation to the alternatives. Concerns about the continued use of DDT are fueled by recent reports of high levels of human exposure associated with indoor spraying amid accumulating evidence on chronic health effects. There are signs that more malaria vectors are becoming resistant to the toxic action of DDT, and that resistance is spreading to new countries. A comprehensive cost assessment of DDT versus its alternatives that takes side effects into account is missing. Effective chemical methods are available as immediate alternatives to DDT, but the choice of insecticide class is limited, and in certain areas the development of resistance is undermining the efficacy of insecticidal tools. New insecticides are not expected in the short term. Nonchemical methods are potentially important, but their effectiveness at program level needs urgent study. To reduce reliance on DDT, support is needed for integrated and multipartner strategies of vector control and for the continued development of new technologies. Integrated vector management provides a framework for developing and implementing effective technologies and strategies as sustainable alternatives to reliance on DDT.
    Environmental Health Perspectives 11/2009; 117(11):1656-63. · 7.26 Impact Factor
  • Henk van den Berg, Willem Takken
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    ABSTRACT: Initiatives on integrated vector management (IVM) approaches are increasingly undertaken as alternatives to existing vector control. An impact model of IVM is presented with performance and impact indicators at six causal steps from coverage of the intervention to impact on disease. Impacts in fields other than health are also discussed because of the emphasis in IVM on capacity building, partnerships and sustainability. A conceptual framework for evaluation of IVM is designed, based on considerations of the selection of indicators, level of inference, cluster size and method of evaluation. The framework, which is tested in three case studies, is intended as guidance for public health workers and policy-makers.
    Trends in Parasitology 01/2009; 25(2):71-6. · 5.51 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term gonadal sequelae after treatment for childhood Hodgkin's lymphoma with combination chemotherapy, using up to date fertility parameters and andrological evaluation, including for the first time inhibin B. There were 56 male patients treated from 1974-1998 for childhood Hodgkin's lymphoma with combination chemotherapy ABVD or EBVD (adriamycin/epirubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine, dacarbazine) with or without MOPP (mechlorethamine, vincristin, prednisone, procarbazine) with the intention to avoid radiotherapy. These men were studied 15.5 years (range 5.6-30.2 years) after cessation of therapy. Serum follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), inhibin B, testosterone, sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), sperm concentration and sperm DNA integrity were determined. In men treated with MOPP, median FSH and LH were significantly increased (P < 0.001) and inhibin B (17.5 versus 143 ng/l; P < 0.001) and sperm concentration (1.05 versus 49.5 x 10(6)/ml; P < 0.05) were significantly decreased compared with patients treated without MOPP. The number of MOPP courses was significantly correlated with FSH and inhibin B levels. Only inhibin B showed an independent correlation with sperm concentration (r = 0.86; P < 0.001). The use of MOPP chemotherapy causes permanent gonadal damage in the far majority of male survivors of childhood Hodgkin's lymphoma and inhibin B is the most valuable serum marker for gonadal function.
    Human Reproduction 12/2007; 22(12):3215-22. · 4.67 Impact Factor
  • Henk van den Berg, Willem Takken
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    ABSTRACT: Integrated vector management (IVM) aims to extend the basis of disease control by involving other sectors and local communities in control action. It is vital that decisions on IVM are made locally for two reasons: first, the epidemiology of disease can vary at a small spatial scale, suggesting the need for precise targeting and second, a number of disease determinants relate to the actions and conditions of local communities, suggesting the need for their increased participation. This requires a shift from centrally managed, sector-specific operations to the facilitation of multi-partner programmes at the district and local level. We propose a methodology for involving local partners outside the health sector in describing and mapping the local determinants and conditions of disease, analysing control options, and consolidating a joint strategy of control. Thus determinants that often lie outside the domain of the health sector are tackled.
    Tropical Medicine & International Health 11/2007; 12(10):1230-8. · 2.94 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term effects of combination chemotherapy treatment for girls with Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) on gonadal function using anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) and inhibin B as ovarian reserve parameters. LH, FSH, inhibin B, and AMH were measured in 32 women treated from 1974 to 1998 for pediatric HL with chemotherapy, with the intention to avoid radiotherapy. All patients [median age 25.0 yr (range 19.2-40.4 yr)] were in complete remission with a median follow-up time of 14.0 yr (range 5.7-24.5 yr) after therapy. All patients were treated with combination chemotherapy doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine and dacarbazine (ABVD) or EBVD with or without mechlorethamine, vincristine, procarbazine, and prednisone (MOPP). Because of incomplete remission or relapse, involved field radiotherapy was needed in seven of 32 women. Results were compared with a healthy control group. Patients treated with six or more cycles of MOPP combination chemotherapy had significantly higher levels of FSH and lower serum levels of inhibin B and AMH, compared with healthy women [FSH, 17.0 vs. 6.0 U/liter (P < 0.05); inhibin B, 23.0 vs. 112.5 ng/liter (P < 0.01); AMH, 0.39 vs. 2.10 microg/liter (P < 0.01)]. AMH was also significantly lower, compared with women treated without MOPP (median 0.39 vs. 1.40 microg/liter; P = 0.01). Women treated during childhood for HL with MOPP seem to have a distinctly lower ovarian reserve as measured by lower AMH values at early adulthood, compared with healthy women. Moreover, AMH seems to be the only predictor that is sufficiently sensitive to detect this decrease in ovarian reserve.
    Journal of Clinical Endocrinology &amp Metabolism 10/2007; 92(10):3869-74. · 6.43 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Irrigated agriculture exposes rural people to health risks associated with vector-borne diseases and pesticides used in agriculture and for public health protection. Most developing countries lack collaboration between the agricultural and health sectors to jointly address these problems. We present an evaluation of a project that uses the "farmer field school" method to teach farmers how to manage vector-borne diseases and how to improve rice yields. Teaching farmers about these two concepts together is known as "integrated pest and vector management". An intersectoral project targeting rice irrigation systems in Sri Lanka. Project partners developed a new curriculum for the field school that included a component on vector-borne diseases. Rice farmers in intervention villages who graduated from the field school took vector-control actions as well as improving environmental sanitation and their personal protection measures against disease transmission. They also reduced their use of agricultural pesticides, especially insecticides. The intervention motivated and enabled rural people to take part in vector-management activities and to reduce several environmental health risks. There is scope for expanding the curriculum to include information on the harmful effects of pesticides on human health and to address other public health concerns. Benefits of this approach for community-based health programmes have not yet been optimally assessed. Also, the institutional basis of the integrated management approach needs to be broadened so that people from a wider range of organizations take part. A monitoring and evaluation system needs to be established to measure the performance of integrated management initiatives.
    Bulletin of the World Health Organisation 08/2007; 85(7):561-6. · 5.25 Impact Factor
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    Henk Van den Berg, Janice Jiggins
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    ABSTRACT: Public policy in developing countries has failed to invest in educating farmers on how to deal with variable agro-ecosystems and a changing world. Here we present an assessment of a participatory training approach in changing crop protection by farmers from chemically dependent, to more sustainable practices in line with the tenets of Integrated Pest Management (IPM). We review the evidence from the studies on an educational investment designed to capacitate farmers to apply IPM, and discuss these data in the light of an on-going policy debate concerning cost effectiveness. The results indicate substantial immediate and developmental benefits of participation in Farmer Field Schools.
    World Development. 02/2007;
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    Henk van den Berg, Bart G J Knols
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    ABSTRACT: Malaria has strong linkages with agriculture, and farmers in malarious regions have a central position in creating or controlling the conditions that favour disease transmission. An interdisciplinary and integrated approach is needed to involve farmers and more than one sector in control efforts. It is suggested that malaria control can benefit from a complementary intervention in rural development, the Farmer Field School (FFS) on Integrated Pest Management (IPM). This is a form of education that uses experiential learning methods to build farmers' expertise, and has proven farm-level and empowerment effects. The benefits of incorporating malaria control into the IPM curriculum are discussed. An example of a combined health-agriculture curriculum, labeled Integrated Pest and Vector Management (IPVM), developed in Sri Lanka is presented. Institutional ownership and support for IPVM could potentially be spread over several public sectors requiring a process for institutional learning and reform.
    Malaria Journal 02/2006; 5:3. · 3.40 Impact Factor
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Publication Stats

320 Citations
106.92 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2012
    • Pennsylvania State University
      University Park, Maryland, United States
  • 2006–2012
    • Wageningen University
      Wageningen, Gelderland, Netherlands
  • 2011
    • Imperial College London
      Londinium, England, United Kingdom
  • 2007
    • Academisch Medisch Centrum Universiteit van Amsterdam
      Amsterdamo, North Holland, Netherlands