Dennis C Sgroi

Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States

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Publications (120)1223.75 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are present at low concentrations in the peripheral blood of patients with solid tumors. It has been proposed that the isolation, ex vivo culture, and characterization of CTCs may provide an opportunity to noninvasively monitor the changing patterns of drug susceptibility in individual patients as their tumors acquire new mutations. In a proof-of-concept study, we established CTC cultures from six patients with estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer. Three of five CTC lines tested were tumorigenic in mice. Genome sequencing of the CTC lines revealed preexisting mutations in the PIK3CA gene and newly acquired mutations in the estrogen receptor gene (ESR1), PIK3CA gene, and fibroblast growth factor receptor gene (FGFR2), among others. Drug sensitivity testing of CTC lines with multiple mutations revealed potential new therapeutic targets. With optimization of CTC culture conditions, this strategy may help identify the best therapies for individual cancer patients over the course of their disease.
    Science 07/2014; · 31.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER), or GPR30, is a membrane receptor reported to mediate non-genomic estrogen responses. Tamoxifen is a partial agonist at GPER in vitro. Here, we investigated if GPER expression is prognostic in primary breast cancer, if the receptor is treatment-predictive for adjuvant tamoxifen, and if receptor subcellular localization has any impact on the prognostic value. Total and plasma membrane (PM) GPER expression was analyzed by immunohistochemistry in breast tumors from 742 postmenopausal lymph node-negative patients subsequently randomized for tamoxifen treatment for 2-5 years versus no systemic treatment, regardless of estrogen receptor (ER) status, and with a median follow-up of 17 years for patients free of event. PM GPER expression was a strong independent prognostic factor for poor prognosis in breast cancer without treatment-predictive information for tamoxifen. In the tamoxifen-treated ER-positive and progesterone receptor (PgR)-positive patient subgroup, the absence of PM GPER (53 % of all ER-positive tumors) predicted 91 % 20-year distant disease-free survival, compared to 73 % in the presence of GPER (p = 0.001). Total GPER expression showed positive correlations with ER and PgR and negative correlation with histological grade, but the correlations were biphasic. On the other hand, PM GPER expression showed strong negative correlations with ER and PgR, and strong positive correlation with HER2 overexpression and high histological grade. GPER overexpression and PM localization are critical events in breast cancer progression, and lack of GPER in the PM is associated with excellent long-term prognosis in ER-positive and PgR-positive tamoxifen-treated primary breast cancer.
    Breast Cancer Research and Treatment 04/2014; · 4.47 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: There is an unmet clinical need for biomarkers to identify breast cancer patients at an increased risk of developing brain metastases. The objective is to identify gene signatures and biological pathways associated with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive (HER2+) brain metastasis. We combined laser capture microdissection and gene expression microarrays to analyze malignant epithelium from HER2+ breast cancer brain metastases with that from HER2+ nonmetastatic primary tumors. Differential gene expression was performed including Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) using publicly available breast cancer gene expression data sets. In a cohort of HER2+ breast cancer brain metastases, we identified a gene expression signature that anti-correlates with overexpression of BRCA1. Sequence analysis of the HER2+ brain metastases revealed no pathogenic mutations of BRCA1, and therefore the aforementioned signature was designated BRCA1 Deficient-Like (BD-L). Evaluation of an independent cohort of breast cancer metastases demonstrated that BD-L values are significantly higher in brain metastases as compared to other metastatic sites. Although the BD-L signature is present in all subtypes of breast cancer, it is significantly higher in BRCA1 mutant primary tumors as compared with sporadic breast tumors. Additionally, BD-L signature values are significantly higher in HER2-/ER- primary tumors as compared with HER2+/ER + and HER2-/ER + tumors. The BD-L signature correlates with breast cancer cell line pharmacologic response to a combination of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitor and temozolomide, and the signature outperformed four published gene signatures of BRCA1/2 deficiency. A BD-L signature is enriched in HER2+ breast cancer brain metastases without pathogenic BRCA1 mutations. Unexpectedly, elevated BD-L values are found in a subset of primary tumors across all breast cancer subtypes. Evaluation of pharmacological sensitivity in breast cancer cell lines representing all breast cancer subtypes suggests the BD-L signature may serve as a biomarker to identify sporadic breast cancer patients who might benefit from a therapeutic combination of PARP inhibitor and temozolomide and may be indicative of a dysfunctional BRCA1-associated pathway.
    Breast cancer research: BCR 03/2014; 16(2):R25. · 5.87 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Whether wide excision with margins ≥1 cm is sufficient treatment for small low- or intermediate-grade ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is unclear. This is an updated analysis of a phase II, single-arm, prospective trial testing this hypothesis. A total of 158 patients with low- or intermediate-grade DCIS who underwent wide excision alone (without radiation or tamoxifen) were entered onto the trial from 1995 to 2002. Entry criteria included mammographic extent ≤2.5 cm, predominantly low or intermediate nuclear grade, and excision with final microscopic margins ≥1 cm. Eight-year minimum potential follow-up was required for inclusion in the analysis; the final population comprised 143 patients. Cumulative incidence curves were generated to assess rates of local recurrence (LR) or other events. Median follow-up time was 11 years. Nineteen patients (13 %) had LR as a first event within 8 years. Thirteen LR (68 %) were DCIS only and six (32 %) were invasive. Fourteen (74 %) occurred in the original quadrant. The 10-year estimated cumulative incidence of LR was 15.6 %. The estimated annual percentage rate of LR was 1.9 % per patient-year. With longer follow-up, there remains a substantial and ongoing risk of LR in patients with favorable DCIS treated with wide excision margins without radiation. This information should be useful as patients and clinicians weigh the options of wide excision with and without radiation.
    Breast Cancer Research and Treatment 12/2013; · 4.47 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: mTOR and its downstream effectors the 4E-binding protein 1 (4EBP1) and the p70 ribosomal S6 kinases (S6K1 and S6K2) are frequently upregulated in breast cancer, and assumed to be driving forces in tumourigenesis, in close connection with oestrogen receptor (ER) networks. Here, we investigated these factors as clinical markers in five different cohorts of breast cancer patients. The prognostic significance of 4EBP1, S6K1 and S6K2 mRNA expression was assessed with real-time PCR in 93 tumours from the treatment randomised Stockholm trials, encompassing postmenopausal patients enrolled between 1976 and 1990. Three publicly available breast cancer cohorts were used to confirm the results. Furthermore, the predictive values of 4EBP1 and p4EBP1_S65 protein expression for both prognosis and endocrine treatment benefit were assessed by immunohistochemical analysis of 912 node-negative breast cancers from the Stockholm trials. S6K2 and 4EBP1 mRNA expression levels showed significant correlation and were associated with a poor outcome in all cohorts investigated. 4EBP1 protein was confirmed as an independent prognostic factor, especially in progesterone receptor (PgR)-expressing cancers. 4EBP1 protein expression was also associated with a poor response to endocrine treatment in the ER/PgR positive group. Cross-talk to genomic as well as non-genomic ER/PgR signalling may be involved and the results further support a combination of ER and mTOR signalling targeted therapies. This study suggests S6K2 and 4EBP1 as important factors for breast tumourigenesis, interplaying with hormone receptor signalling. We propose S6K2 and 4EBP1 as new potential clinical markers for prognosis and endocrine therapy response in breast cancer.
    Breast cancer research: BCR 10/2013; 15(5):R96. · 5.87 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Biomarkers to improve the risk-benefit of extended adjuvant endocrine therapy for late recurrence in patients with oestrogen-receptor-positive breast cancer would be clinically valuable. We compared the prognostic ability of the breast-cancer index (BCI) assay, 21-gene recurrence score (Oncotype DX), and an immunohistochemical prognostic model (IHC4) for both early and late recurrence in patients with oestrogen-receptor-positive, node-negative (N0) disease who took part in the Arimidex, Tamoxifen, Alone or in Combination (ATAC) clinical trial. In this prospective comparison study, we obtained archival tumour blocks from the TransATAC tissue bank from all postmenopausal patients with oestrogen-receptor-positive breast cancer from whom the 21-gene recurrence score and IHC4 values had already been derived. We did BCI analysis in matched samples with sufficient residual RNA using two BCI models-cubic (BCI-C) and linear (BCI-L)-using previously validated cutoffs. We assessed prognostic ability of BCI for distant recurrence over 10 years (the primary endpoint) and compared it with that of the 21-gene recurrence score and IHC4. We also tested the ability of the assays to predict early (0-5 years) and late (5-10 years) distant recurrence. To assess the ability of the biomarkers to predict recurrence beyond standard clinicopathological variables, we calculated the change in the likelihood-ratio χ(2) (LR-Δχ(2)) from Cox proportional hazards models. Suitable tissue was available from 665 patients with oestrogen-receptor-positive, N0 breast cancer for BCI analysis. The primary analysis showed significant differences in risk of distant recurrence over 10 years in the categorical BCI-C risk groups (p<0·0001) with 6·8% (95% CI 4·4-10·0) of patients in the low-risk group, 17·3% (12·0-24·7) in the intermediate group, and 22·2% (15·3-31·5) in the high-risk group having distant recurrence. The secondary analysis showed that BCI-L was a much stronger predictor for overall (0-10 year) distant recurrence compared with BCI-C (interquartile HR 2·30 [95% CI 1·62-3·27]; LR-Δχ(2)=22·69; p<0·0001). When compared with BCI-L, the 21-gene recurrence score was less predictive (HR 1·48 [95% CI 1·22-1·78]; LR-Δχ(2)=13·68; p=0·0002) and IHC4 was similar (HR 1·69 [95% CI 1·51-2·56]; LR-Δχ(2)=22·83; p<0·0001). All further analyses were done with the BCI-L model. In a multivariable analysis, all assays had significant prognostic ability for early distant recurrence (BCI-L HR 2·77 [95% CI 1·63-4·70], LR-Δχ(2)=15·42, p<0·0001; 21-gene recurrence score HR 1·80 [1·42-2·29], LR-Δχ(2)=18·48, p<0·0001; IHC4 HR 2·90 [2·01-4·18], LR-Δχ(2)=29·14, p<0·0001); however, only BCI-L was significant for late distant recurrence (BCI-L HR 1·95 [95% CI 1·22-3·14], LR-Δχ(2)=7·97, p=0·0048; 21-gene recurrence score HR 1·13 [0·82-1·56], LR-Δχ(2)=0·48, p=0·47; IHC4 HR 1·30 [0·88-1·94], LR-Δχ(2)=1·59, p=0·20). BCI-L was the only significant prognostic test for risk of both early and late distant recurrence and identified two risk populations for each timeframe. It could help to identify patients at high risk for late distant recurrence who might benefit from extended endocrine or other therapy. Avon Foundation, National Institutes of Health, Breast Cancer Foundation, US Department of Defense Breast Cancer Research Program, Susan G Komen for the Cure, Breakthrough Breast Cancer through the Mary-Jean Mitchell Green Foundation, AstraZeneca, Cancer Research UK, and the National Institute for Health Research Biomedical Research Centre at the Royal Marsden (London, UK).
    The Lancet Oncology 09/2013; · 25.12 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Biomarkers to optimize extended adjuvant endocrine therapy for women with estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer are limited. The HOXB13/IL17BR (H/I) biomarker predicts recurrence risk in ER-positive, lymph node-negative breast cancer patients. H/I was evaluated in MA.17 trial for prognostic performance for late recurrence and treatment benefit from extended adjuvant letrozole. A prospective-retrospective, nested case-control design of 83 recurrences matched to 166 nonrecurrences from letrozole- and placebo-treated patients within MA.17 was conducted. Expression of H/I within primary tumors was determined by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction with a prespecified cutpoint. The predictive ability of H/I for ascertaining benefit from letrozole was determined using multivariable conditional logistic regression including standard clinicopathological factors as covariates. All statistical tests were two-sided. High H/I was statistically significantly associated with a decrease in late recurrence in patients receiving extended letrozole therapy (odds ratio [OR] = 0.35; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.16 to 0.75; P = .007). In an adjusted model with standard clinicopathological factors, high H/I remained statistically significantly associated with patient benefit from letrozole (OR = 0.33; 95% CI = 0.15 to 0.73; P = .006). Reduction in the absolute risk of recurrence at 5 years was 16.5% for patients with high H/I (P = .007). The interaction between H/I and letrozole treatment was statistically significant (P = .03). In the absence of extended letrozole therapy, high H/I identifies a subgroup of ER-positive patients disease-free after 5 years of tamoxifen who are at risk for late recurrence. When extended endocrine therapy with letrozole is prescribed, high H/I predicts benefit from therapy and a decreased probability of late disease recurrence.
    CancerSpectrum Knowledge Environment 06/2013; · 14.07 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Residual risk of relapse remains a substantial concern for hormone-receptor (HR+) positive breast cancer patients, with approximately half of all disease recurrences occurring after 5 years of adjuvant anti-estrogen therapy. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: The objective of this study was to examine the prognostic performance of an optimized model of Breast Cancer Index (BCI), an algorithmic gene expression-based signature, for prediction of early (0-5 years) and late (>5 years) risk of distant recurrence in estrogen receptor positive (ER+), lymph node negative (LN-) patients. The BCI model was validated by retrospective analyses of tumor samples from tamoxifen-treated patients from a randomized prospective trial (Stockholm TAM, n=317) and a Multi-institutional cohort (n=358). RESULTS: Within the Stockholm TAM cohort, BCI risk groups stratified the majority (~65%) of patients as low risk with <3% distant recurrence rate for 0-5 years and 5-10 years. In the Multi-institutional cohort, which had larger tumors, 55% of patients were classified as BCI low risk with <5% distant recurrence rate for 0-5 years and 5-10 years. For both cohorts, continuous BCI was the most significant prognostic factor beyond standard clinicopathological factors for 0-5 years and >5 years. CONCLUSIONS: The prognostic sustainability of BCI to assess early and late distant recurrence risk at diagnosis has clinical utility for decisions of chemotherapy at diagnosis and for decisions for extended adjuvant endocrine therapy beyond 5 years.
    Clinical Cancer Research 06/2013; · 7.84 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The oestrogen receptor (ER) co-activator amplified in breast cancer 1 (AIB1) has been suggested as a treatment predictive and prognostic marker in breast cancer. Studies have however not been unanimous. PATIENTS AND METHODS: AIB1 protein expression was analysed by immunohistochemistry on tissue micro-arrays with tumour samples from 910 postmenopausal women randomised to tamoxifen treatment or no adjuvant treatment. Associations between AIB1 expression, clinical outcome in the two arms and other clinicopathological variables were examined. RESULTS: In patients with ER-positive breast cancer expressing low tumour levels of AIB1 (<75%), we found no significant difference in recurrence-free survival (RFS) or breast cancer-specific survival (BCS) between tamoxifen treated and untreated patients. In patients with high AIB1 expression (>75%), there was a significant decrease in recurrence rate (HR 0.40, 95% CI 0.26-0.61, P < 0.001) and breast cancer mortality rate (HR 0.38, 95% CI 0.21-0.69, P = 0.0015) with tamoxifen treatment. In the untreated arm, we found high expression of AIB1 to be significantly associated with lower RFS (HR 1.74, 95% CI 1.20-2.53, P = 0.0038). CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that high AIB1 is a predictive marker of good response to tamoxifen treatment in postmenopausal women and a prognostic marker of decreased RFS in systemically untreated patients.
    Annals of Oncology 05/2013; · 7.38 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Non-communicable diseases, including cancer, are overtaking infectious disease as the leading health-care threat in middle-income and low-income countries. Latin American and Caribbean countries are struggling to respond to increasing morbidity and death from advanced disease. Health ministries and health-care systems in these countries face many challenges caring for patients with advanced cancer: inadequate funding; inequitable distribution of resources and services; inadequate numbers, training, and distribution of health-care personnel and equipment; lack of adequate care for many populations based on socioeconomic, geographic, ethnic, and other factors; and current systems geared toward the needs of wealthy, urban minorities at a cost to the entire population. This burgeoning cancer problem threatens to cause widespread suffering and economic peril to the countries of Latin America. Prompt and deliberate actions must be taken to avoid this scenario. Increasing efforts towards prevention of cancer and avoidance of advanced, stage IV disease will reduce suffering and mortality and will make overall cancer care more affordable. We hope the findings of our Commission and our recommendations will inspire Latin American stakeholders to redouble their efforts to address this increasing cancer burden and to prevent it from worsening and threatening their societies.
    The Lancet Oncology 04/2013; 14(5):391-436. · 25.12 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Studies have shown that a two-gene ratio (HOXB13:IL17BR) and a five-gene (BUB1B, CENPA, NEK2, RACGAP1, RRM2) molecular grade index (MGI) are predictive of clinical outcomes among early-stage breast cancer patients. In an independent population of lymph node-negative breast cancer patients from a community hospital setting, we evaluated the performance of two risk classifiers that have been derived from these gene signatures combined, MGI+HOXB13:IL17BR and the Breast Cancer Index (BCI). METHODS: A case-control study was conducted among 4,964 Kaiser Permanente patients diagnosed with node-negative invasive breast cancer from 1985 to 1994 who did not receive adjuvant chemotherapy. For 191 cases (breast cancer deaths) and 417 matched controls, archived tumor tissues were available and analyzed for expression levels of the 7 genes of interest and 4 normalization genes by RT-PCR. Logistic regression methods were used to estimate the relative risk (RR) and ten-year absolute risk of breast cancer death associated with pre-specified risk categories for MGI+HOXB13:IL17BR and BCI. RESULTS: Both MGI+HOXB13:IL17BR and BCI classified over half of all ER-positive patients as low risk. The ten-year absolute risks of breast cancer death for ER-positive, tamoxifen-treated patients classified in the low, intermediate, and high risk groups were 3.7% (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.9%-5.4%), 5.9% (95% CI 3.0%-8.6%), and 12.9% (95% CI 7.9%-17.6%) by MGI+HOXB13:IL17BR and 3.5% (95% CI 1.9%-5.1%), 7.0% (95% CI 3.8%-10.1%), and 12.9% (95% CI 7.1%-18.3%) by BCI. Those for ER-positive, tamoxifen-untreated patients were 5.7% (95% CI 4.0%-7.4%), 13.8% (95% CI 8.4%-18.9%), and 15.2% (95% CI 9.4%-20.5%) by MGI+HOXB13:IL17BR and 5.1% (95% CI 3.6%-6.6%), 18.6% (95% CI 10.8%-25.7%), and 17.5% (95% CI 11.1%-23.5%) by BCI. After adjusting for tumor size and grade, the RRs of breast cancer death comparing high versus low risk categories of both classifiers remained elevated but were attenuated for tamoxifen-treated and tamoxifen-untreated patients. Conclusion: Among ER-positive, lymph-node negative patients not treated with adjuvant chemotherapy, MGI+HOXB13:IL17BR and BCI were associated with risk of breast cancer death. Both risk classifiers appeared to provide risk information beyond standard prognostic factors.
    Breast cancer research: BCR 03/2013; 15(2):R24. · 5.87 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of adherent epithelial cells to a migratory mesenchymal state has been implicated in tumor metastasis in preclinical models. To investigate its role in human cancer, we characterized EMT in circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from breast cancer patients. Rare primary tumor cells simultaneously expressed mesenchymal and epithelial markers, but mesenchymal cells were highly enriched in CTCs. Serial CTC monitoring in 11 patients suggested an association of mesenchymal CTCs with disease progression. In an index patient, reversible shifts between these cell fates accompanied each cycle of response to therapy and disease progression. Mesenchymal CTCs occurred as both single cells and multicellular clusters, expressing known EMT regulators, including transforming growth factor (TGF)-β pathway components and the FOXC1 transcription factor. These data support a role for EMT in the blood-borne dissemination of human breast cancer.
    Science 02/2013; 339(6119):580-584. · 31.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Most endometrial cancers can be classified histologically as endometrioid, serous, or clear cell. Non-endometrioid endometrial cancers (NEECs; serous and clear cell) are the most clinically aggressive of the three major histotypes and are characterized by aneuploidy, a feature of chromosome instability. The genetic alterations that underlie chromosome instability in endometrial cancer are poorly understood. In the present study, we used Sanger sequencing to search for nucleotide variants in the coding exons and splice junctions of 21 candidate chromosome instability genes, including 19 genes implicated in sister chromatid cohesion, from 24 primary, microsatellite-stable NEECs. Somatic mutations were verified by sequencing matched normal DNAs. We subsequently resequenced mutated genes from 41 additional NEECs as well as 42 endometrioid ECs (EECs). We uncovered nonsynonymous somatic mutations in ESCO1, CHTF18, and MRE11A in, respectively, 3.7% (4 of 107), 1.9% (2 of 107), and 1.9% (2 of 107) of endometrial tumors. Overall, 7.7% (5 of 65) of NEECs and 2.4% (1 of 42) of EECs had somatically mutated one or more of the three genes. A subset of mutations are predicted to impact protein function. The co-occurrence of somatic mutations in ESCO1 and CHTF18 was statistically significant (P = 0.0011, two-tailed Fisher's exact test). This is the first report of somatic mutations within ESCO1 and CHTF18 in endometrial tumors and of MRE11A mutations in microsatellite-stable endometrial tumors. Our findings warrant future studies to determine whether these mutations are driver events that contribute to the pathogenesis of endometrial cancer.
    PLoS ONE 01/2013; 8(6):e63313. · 3.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Endometrial cancer is the sixth most commonly diagnosed cancer in women worldwide, causing ∼74,000 deaths annually. Serous endometrial cancers are a clinically aggressive subtype with a poorly defined genetic etiology. We used whole-exome sequencing to comprehensively search for somatic mutations within ∼22,000 protein-encoding genes in 13 primary serous endometrial tumors. We subsequently resequenced 18 genes, which were mutated in more than 1 tumor and/or were components of an enriched functional grouping, from 40 additional serous tumors. We identified high frequencies of somatic mutations in CHD4 (17%), EP300 (8%), ARID1A (6%), TSPYL2 (6%), FBXW7 (29%), SPOP (8%), MAP3K4 (6%) and ABCC9 (6%). Overall, 36.5% of serous tumors had a mutated chromatin-remodeling gene, and 35% had a mutated ubiquitin ligase complex gene, implicating frequent mutational disruption of these processes in the molecular pathogenesis of one of the deadliest forms of endometrial cancer.
    Nature Genetics 10/2012; · 35.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Breast carcinoma is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality in women worldwide, with an estimated 1.38 million new cases and 458,000 deaths in 2008 alone. This malignancy represents a heterogeneous group of tumours with characteristic molecular features, prognosis and responses to available therapy. Recurrent somatic alterations in breast cancer have been described, including mutations and copy number alterations, notably ERBB2 amplifications, the first successful therapy target defined by a genomic aberration. Previous DNA sequencing studies of breast cancer genomes have revealed additional candidate mutations and gene rearrangements. Here we report the whole-exome sequences of DNA from 103 human breast cancers of diverse subtypes from patients in Mexico and Vietnam compared to matched-normal DNA, together with whole-genome sequences of 22 breast cancer/normal pairs. Beyond confirming recurrent somatic mutations in PIK3CA, TP53, AKT1, GATA3 and MAP3K1, we discovered recurrent mutations in the CBFB transcription factor gene and deletions of its partner RUNX1. Furthermore, we have identified a recurrent MAGI3-AKT3 fusion enriched in triple-negative breast cancer lacking oestrogen and progesterone receptors and ERBB2 expression. The MAGI3-AKT3 fusion leads to constitutive activation of AKT kinase, which is abolished by treatment with an ATP-competitive AKT small-molecule inhibitor.
    Nature 06/2012; 486(7403):405-9. · 38.60 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Gene and protein expression changes observed with tumorigenesis are often interpreted independently of each other and out of context of biological networks. To address these limitations, this study examined several approaches to integrate transcriptomic and proteomic data with known protein-protein and signaling interactions in estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer tumors. An approach that built networks from differentially expressed proteins and identified among them networks enriched in differentially expressed genes yielded the greatest success. This method identified a set of genes and proteins linking pathways of cellular stress response, cancer metabolism, and tumor microenvironment. The proposed network underscores several biologically intriguing events not previously studied in the context of ER+ breast cancer, including the overexpression of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and the overexpression of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1. A gene-based expression signature biomarker built from this network was significantly predictive of clinical relapse in multiple independent cohorts of ER+ breast cancer patients, even after correcting for standard clinicopathological variables. The results of this study demonstrate the utility and power of an integrated quantitative proteomic, transcriptomic, and network analysis approach to discover robust and clinically meaningful molecular changes in tumors.
    Molecular &amp Cellular Proteomics 01/2012; 11(6):M111.014910. · 7.25 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Precise proteomic profiling of limited levels of disease tissue represents an extremely challenging task. Here, we present an effective and reproducible microproteomic workflow for sample sizes of only 10,000 cells that integrates selective sample procurement via laser capture microdissection (LCM), sample clean-up and protein level fractionation using short-range SDS-PAGE, followed by ultrasensitive LC-MS/MS analysis using a 10 μm i.d. porous layer open tubular (PLOT) column. With 10,000 LCM captured mouse hepatocytes for method development and performance assessment, only 10% of the in-gel digest, equivalent to ∼1000 cells, was needed per LC-MS/MS analysis. The optimized workflow was applied to the differential proteomic analysis of 10,000 LCM collected primary and metastatic breast cancer cells from the same patient. More than 1100 proteins were identified from each injection with >1700 proteins identified from three LCM samples of 10,000 cells from the same patient (1123 with at least two unique peptides). Label free quantitation (spectral counting) was performed to identify differential protein expression between the primary and metastatic cell populations. Informatics analysis of the resulting data indicated that vesicular transport and extracellular remodeling processes were significantly altered between the two cell types. The ability to extract meaningful biological information from limited, but highly informative cell populations demonstrates the significant benefits of the described microproteomic workflow.
    Journal of Chromatography A 11/2011; 1218(45):8168-74. · 4.61 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The molecular analysis of biomarkers in oncology is rapidly advancing, but the incorporation of new molecular tests into clinical practice will require a greater understanding of the genetic changes that drive malignancy, the assays used to measure the resulting phenotypes and genotypes, and the regulatory processes that new molecular biomarkers must face to be accepted for clinical use. To address these issues and provide an overview of current molecular testing in 6 major malignancies, including glioma, breast cancer, colon cancer, lung cancer, prostate cancer, and acute myelogenous leukemia, an NCCN Task Force was convened on the topic of evaluating the clinical utility of tumor markers in oncology. The output of this meeting, contained within this report, describes the ways biomarkers have been developed and used; defines common terminology, including prognostic, predictive, and companion diagnostic markers, and analytic validity, clinical validity, and clinical utility; and proposes the use of a combination level of evidence score to aid in the evaluation of novel biomarker tests as they arise. The current state of regulatory oversight and anticipated changes in the regulation of molecular testing are also addressed.
    Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network: JNCCN 11/2011; 9 Suppl 5:S1-32; quiz S33. · 5.11 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: ATAD5, the human ortholog of yeast Elg1, plays a role in PCNA deubiquitination. Since PCNA modification is important to regulate DNA damage bypass, ATAD5 may be important for suppression of genomic instability in mammals in vivo. To test this hypothesis, we generated heterozygous (Atad5(+/m)) mice that were haploinsuffficient for Atad5. Atad5(+/m) mice displayed high levels of genomic instability in vivo, and Atad5(+/m) mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) exhibited molecular defects in PCNA deubiquitination in response to DNA damage, as well as DNA damage hypersensitivity and high levels of genomic instability, apoptosis, and aneuploidy. Importantly, 90% of haploinsufficient Atad5(+/m) mice developed tumors, including sarcomas, carcinomas, and adenocarcinomas, between 11 and 20 months of age. High levels of genomic alterations were evident in tumors that arose in the Atad5(+/m) mice. Consistent with a role for Atad5 in suppressing tumorigenesis, we also identified somatic mutations of ATAD5 in 4.6% of sporadic human endometrial tumors, including two nonsense mutations that resulted in loss of proper ATAD5 function. Taken together, our findings indicate that loss-of-function mutations in mammalian Atad5 are sufficient to cause genomic instability and tumorigenesis.
    PLoS Genetics 08/2011; 7(8):e1002245. · 8.52 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

8k Citations
1,223.75 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2003–2014
    • Harvard Medical School
      • • Department of Pathology
      • • Department of Cell Biology
      Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • 2011–2013
    • National Human Genome Research Institute
      Maryland, United States
  • 1999–2012
    • Massachusetts General Hospital
      • • Department of Pathology
      • • Department of Surgery
      Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • 2010–2011
    • Northeastern University
      Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • 2002–2011
    • National Institutes of Health
      • Branch of Cancer Genetics
      Bethesda, MD, United States
  • 2009
    • Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
      • Department of Medical Oncology
      Boston, MA, United States
  • 2002–2009
    • Joslin Diabetes Center
      • Section on Islet Cell and Regenerative Biology
      Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • 2006
    • Roger Williams University
      Bristol, Rhode Island, United States
  • 2005
    • University of Illinois at Chicago
      • Department of Medicine (Chicago)
      Chicago, IL, United States