Cagla Sar

Baskent University, Engüri, Ankara, Turkey

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Publications (13)14.08 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Objectives Orthognathic surgery is a procedure for patients with dentofacial deformities and provides dramatical dentofacial and psychological alterations. The aim of this controlled study was to evaluate how orthognathic surgery affects patients’ psychosocial well-being and compare them with patients having dentofacial discrepancies and with individuals who do not have any skeletal discrepancies. Methods Hundred and sixty-three adult individuals were included in this study as three groups: patients who underwent orthognathic surgery, patients having skeletal discrepancies and individuals who do not have any skeletal discrepancies. Patients in all groups were asked to fill out two questionnaires concerning the psychological and physical status of the patients at that moment and additional questions were asked to patients in post-surgical phase regarding post-surgical satisfaction. Categorical variables were statistically evaluated by Fisher Exact and chi-square tests. Results Patients who were going to seek orthognathic surgery were significantly concerned about their dentofacial appearance, body image and psychosocial status when compared with patients in the post-surgical phase and the individuals who did not have skeletal discrepancies. The results of the patients who underwent orthognathic surgery were approximated to the results of non-patient control group and had high degrees of satisfaction with improvement in appearance brought about by surgery at 6-month post-operatively. Conclusion Following orthognathic surgery, patients had better psychosocial status when compared to patients without skeletal deformities. Patients in the pre-surgical phase were not only functionally but also psychosocially the least satisfied group of individuals.
    Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Medicine, and Pathology. 04/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: For facial esthetic reasons, no sclera should be exposed above or below the irises when the head of a patient who has a normal skeletal pattern is in a neutral position and the eyelids are in a relaxed position. This study evaluated the decrease in sclera exposure after maxillary advancement or impaction in patients with midfacial hypoplasia. Forty-seven consecutive patients (24 male, 23 female) who underwent Le Fort I osteotomy were included. The patients were divided into 2 groups according to type of maxillary movement: group I underwent maxillary advancement (n = 23) and group II underwent maxillary advancement and impaction surgery (n = 24). Standardized preoperative and 6-month postoperative photographs of the frontal view of patients were evaluated using Adobe Photoshop CS5. The proportion of inferior sclera exposure to eye height was determined, and the proportional difference between the preoperative and postoperative orbital views was statistically analyzed. The proportion of inferior sclera exposure to eye height decreased by a ratio of 0.07 (P = .001) in the right and left eyes of the 47 patients, with an average maxillary advancement of 6.1 mm. The proportion of inferior sclera exposure to eye height of the right and left eyes decreased from 0.1 to 0.02 and from 0.09 to 0.02, respectively, in group I (P = .001). The proportion of inferior sclera exposure to eye height decreased in group II by a ratio of 0.06 in the right and left eyes (P = .001). Inferior sclera exposure in patients with midfacial hypoplasia and retrognathia decreases significantly in accordance with the change in the lower eyelid position after maxillary advancement or impaction surgeries.
    Journal of oral and maxillofacial surgery: official journal of the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons 01/2014; 72(1):166.e1-166.e5. · 1.58 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this clinical study was to investigate the skeletal, dentoalveolar, and soft-tissue effects of 2 skeletal anchorage rationales for Class III treatment compared with an untreated Class III control group. Fifty-one subjects who were in the prepubertal or pubertal growth period were included in the study. In group 1 (n = 17), facemasks were applied from miniplates placed in the lateral nasal walls of the maxilla, and intermaxillary Class III elastics were applied from symphyseal miniplates to a bonded appliance on the maxilla in group 2 (n = 17). These skeletal anchored groups were compared with an untreated control group (n = 17). Lateral cephalometric radiographs were obtained at the beginning and the end of the observation periods in all groups and analyzed according to the structural superimposition method. Differences between the groups were assessed with the Wilcoxon signed rank test or the paired-samples t test. The treatment periods were 7.4 and 7.6 months in groups 1 and 2, respectively, and the untreated control group was observed for 7.5 months. The maxilla moved forward by 3.11 mm in group 1 and by 3.82 mm in group 2. The counterclockwise rotation of the maxilla was significantly less in group 1 compared with group 2 (P <0.01). The mandible showed clockwise rotation and was positioned downward and backward in the treatment groups, and it was significantly greater in group 2 compared with group 1 (P <0.01). Changes in the maxillary incisor measurements were negligible in group 1 compared with group 2. A significant amount of mandibular incisor retroclination was seen in group 1, and a significant proclination was seen in group 2. The maxillomandibular relationships and the soft-tissue profiles were improved remarkably in both treatment groups. The protocols of miniplates with facemasks and miniplates with Class III elastics offer valid alternatives to conventional methods in severe skeletal Class III patients. However, the 2 maxillary protraction protocols demonstrated significant skeletal and dentoalveolar effects. The miniplate with facemask protocol is preferred for patients with severe maxillary retrusion and a high-angle vertical pattern, whereas in patients with a decreased or normal vertical pattern and retroclined mandibular incisors, miniplates with Class III elastics can be the intraoral treatment option. Therefore, the exact indication of the procedure should be considered carefully.
    American journal of orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics: official publication of the American Association of Orthodontists, its constituent societies, and the American Board of Orthodontics 01/2014; 145(1):41-54. · 1.33 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Rubinstein-Taybi Syndrome (RTS) is a rare multiple congenital syndrome characterized by distinctive facial features, mental and growth retardation, broad thumbs and great toes. This case report describes the oro-dental manifestations, as well as, orthodontic evaluation of a 9-year-old male patient who had RTS. The remarkable oro-dental features were talon-like cingulum on maxillary central incisors, unerupted supernumerary teeth. Cone-beam computerized tomography was taken in order to identify his skeletal anomalies, bilateral cross-bite and a narrow maxilla were diagnosed. Dental treatments were completed under i.v sedation due to the patient's inability to cooperate during dental treatment. Perioparetive and postoperative courses were uneventful. Following dental treatments, orthodontic therapy was initiated with a fixed rapid maxillary expansion appliance.
    Journal of clinical and diagnostic research : JCDR. 01/2014; 8(1):276-8.
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to assess the diagnostic accuracy and surface matching characteristics of 3-dimensional digital dental models obtained from various sources. Three sets of maxillary and mandibular digital models of 30 subjects were included in this study. Three-dimensional stereolithography model files were obtained from a 3-dimensional laser desktop scanner (Ortho-Insight 3D; Motionview Software, Hixson, Tenn), the emodel system (GeoDigm, Chanhassen, Minn), and cone-beam computerized tomography. Arch-length discrepancy measurements were made on the 3-dimensional digital models and compared with direct caliper measurements. Additionally, stereolithography files from the 3 digital model systems were paired and superimposed using a best-fit algorithm. Average linear differences between the stereolithography shells were computed together with surface correlation amounts at various tolerance levels. Data were evaluated using intraclass correlation coefficients and the Tukey mean difference test. Although all 3 digital model groups displayed good correlation with caliper measurements, the virtual scan models had the highest correlation with the manual method (ICC > 0.95). The Tukey mean difference test showed no consistent bias of one approach vs the others compared with caliper measurements; random errors were detected in all the comparisons. For the estimation of arch-length discrepancy, the mean bias of the scanned virtual models in comparison with caliper measurements (0.24 ± 0.67 mm) was smaller than the mean biases of the emodels and the models generated from cone-beam computed tomography. Additionally, the best surface overlap correlation was observed between the virtual scanned models and the emodels. The mean linear distances between the stereolithography shells of these 2 model systems were 0.14 and 0.13 mm for the maxillary and mandibular arches, respectively. All 3 digital model systems can provide diagnostic information similar to caliper measurements, with varying degrees of agreement limits. The scanned virtual models had the least mean bias. A strong surface match correlation was observed between the virtual scanned models and the emodels, indicating that these could be used interchangeably.
    American journal of orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics: official publication of the American Association of Orthodontists, its constituent societies, and the American Board of Orthodontics 12/2013; 144(6):831-7. · 1.33 Impact Factor
  • International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery 10/2013; 42(10):1338. · 1.36 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Autotransplantation is a viable treatment option to restore esthetics and function impaired by abnormally shaped teeth when a suitable donors tooth is available. This paper describes the autotransplantation and 2-year follow-up of a supernumerary maxillary incisor as a replacement to a misaligned maxillary incisor with abnormal crown morphology and size. The supernumerary incisor was immediately autotransplanted into the extraction site of the large incisor and was stabilized with a bonded semirigid splint for 2 weeks. Fixed orthodontic therapy was initiated 3 months after autotransplantation. Ideal alignment of the incisors was accomplished after 6 months along with radiographic evidence of apical closure and osseous/periodontal regeneration. In autogenous tooth transplantation, a successful clinical outcome can be achieved if the cases are selected and treated properly.
    Case reports in dentistry. 01/2013; 2013:146343.
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract Objective: To examine skeletal, dental, and soft tissue effects of the Miniscrew Implant Supported Distalization System (MISDS) and the Bone-Anchored Pendulum Appliance (BAPA). Materials and Methods: Among 28 patients displaying Angle Class II malocclusion, 14 patients with a mean age of 14.8 ± 3.6 years treated with MISDS were included in the first group, and 14 patients with a mean age of 14.5 ± 1.5 years treated with BAPA were included in the second group. The pretreatment and posttreatment lateral cephalograms were analyzed. Statistical evaluation was carried out using the paired Shapiro-Wilk test, the paired-sample t-test, and the unpaired t-test. Results: Upper posterior teeth were distalized successfully in both groups. Nearly bodily distalization was seen in the MISDS group, whereas significant distal tipping of the upper first molars was observed in the BAPA group (P < .001). There were no statistically significant changes in the sagittal position of the maxilla and mandible and in the position of the upper incisors as a result of treatment in either group. Conclusions: Both methods provided absolute anchorage for distalization of posterior teeth; however, almost translatory distal movement was encountered in the MISDS group, and substantial distal tipping of the maxillary molars accompanied distalization in the BAPA group.
    The Angle Orthodontist 10/2012; · 1.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: SUMMARY This study aimed to examine the skeletal, dental, and soft tissue effects of the implant-supported pendulum (ISP) and the zygoma anchorage system (ZAS) used for the distalization of maxillary posterior teeth. Among 30 patients showing Angle class II malocclusion, 15 patients with a mean age of 14.3±1.6 years and treated with ISP were included in the first group; 15 patients with a mean age of 14.7±2.5 years and treated with ZAS were included in the second group. The predistalization and postdistalization lateral cephalograms were analysed. Statistical evaluation was carried out using SPSS. Point A and upper incisors protruded in the ISP group, retruded in the ZAS group. Upper posterior teeth were distalized in both groups, but more in the ZAS group. Significant differences were observed between the groups for the sagittal movements of Point A, incisors, and posterior teeth. Overbite decreased in the ISP group, overjet decreased in the ZAS group, upper and lower lips retruded only in the ZAS group. Both methods provided absolute anchorage for distalization of posterior teeth, but the skeletal and soft tissue outcome and distalization obtained was greater in the ZAS group. Both methods can be used as alternatives to extraoral traction and conventional molar distalization appliances with different patient requirements.
    The European Journal of Orthodontics 09/2012; · 1.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this prospective clinical study was to evaluate the skeletal, dentoalveolar, and soft-tissue effects of maxillary protraction with miniplates compared with conventional facemask therapy and an untreated Class III control group. Forty-five subjects who were in prepubertal or pubertal skeletal growth periods were included in the study and divided into 3 groups of 15 patients each. All subjects had skeletal and dental Class III malocclusions with maxillary deficiency, vertically normal growth pattern, anterior crossbite, Angle Class III molar relationship, normal or increased overbite, and retrusive nasomaxillary complex. Before maxillary protraction, rapid maxillary expansion with a bonded appliance was performed in both treatment groups. In the first group (MP+FM), consisting of 5 girls and 10 boys (mean age, 10.91 years), facemasks were applied from 2 titanium miniplates surgically placed laterally to the apertura piriformis regions of the maxilla. The second group (FM) of 7 girls and 8 boys (mean age, 10.31 years) received maxillary protraction therapy with conventional facemasks applied from hooks of the rapid maxillary expansion appliance. The third group of 8 girls and 7 boys (mean age, 10.05 years) was the untreated control group. Lateral cephalometric films were obtained at the beginning and end of treatment or observation in all groups and analyzed according to a structural superimposition method. Measurements were evaulated statistically with Wilcoxon and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Treatment periods were 6.78 and 9.45 months in the MP+FM and FM groups, respectively, and the observation period in the control group was 7.59 months. The differences were significant between the 3 groups (P <0.05) and the MP+FM and FM groups (P <0.001). The maxilla moved forward for 2.3 mm in the MP+FM group and 1.83 mm in the FM group with maxillary protraction. The difference was significant between 2 groups (P <0.001). The protraction rates were 0.45 mm per month in the MP+FM group and 0.24 mm per month in the FM group (P <0.001). The maxilla showed anterior rotation after facemask therapy in the FM group (P <0.01); there was no significant rotation in the MP+FM group. Posterior rotation of the mandible and increased facial height were more evident in the FM group compared with the MP+FM group (P <0.01). Both the maxilla and the mandible moved forward significantly in the control group. Protrusion and mesialization of the maxillary teeth in the FM group were eliminated in the MP+FM group. The maxillomandibular relationships and the soft-tissue profile were improved remarkably in both treatment groups. The undesired effects of conventional facemask therapy were reduced or eliminated with miniplate anchorage, and efficient maxillary protraction was achieved in a shorter treatment period.
    American journal of orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics: official publication of the American Association of Orthodontists, its constituent societies, and the American Board of Orthodontics 05/2011; 139(5):636-49. · 1.33 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The amount of the residual adhesive after bracket debonding is frequently assessed in a qualitative manner, utilizing the adhesive remnant index (ARI). This study aimed to investigate whether quantitative assessment of the adhesive remnant yields more precise results compared to qualitative methods utilizing the 4- and 5-point ARI scales. Twenty debonded brackets were selected. Evaluation and scoring of the adhesive remnant on bracket bases were made consecutively using: 1. qualitative assessment (visual scoring) and 2. quantitative measurement (image analysis) on digital photographs. Image analysis was made on scanning electron micrographs (SEM) and high-precision elemental maps of the adhesive remnant as determined by energy dispersed X-ray spectrometry. Evaluations were made in accordance with the original 4-point and the modified 5-point ARI scales. Intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) were calculated, and the data were evaluated using Friedman test followed by Wilcoxon signed ranks test with Bonferroni correction. ICC statistics indicated high levels of agreement for qualitative visual scoring among examiners. The 4-point ARI scale was compliant with the SEM assessments but indicated significantly less adhesive remnant compared to the results of quantitative elemental mapping. When the 5-point scale was used, both quantitative techniques yielded similar results with those obtained qualitatively. These results indicate that qualitative visual scoring using the ARI is capable of generating similar results with those assessed by quantitative image analysis techniques. In particular, visual scoring with the 5-point ARI scale can yield similar results with both the SEM analysis and elemental mapping.
    The European Journal of Orthodontics 03/2011; 34(2):188-92. · 1.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of enamel pre-treatment with a new fluoride-containing casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) complex on the shear bond strength (SBS) of brackets bonded with etch-and-rinse or self-etching adhesive systems. The material comprised 66 extracted human premolars randomly divided into six equal groups with respect to the enamel pre-treatment and adhesive system employed: 1. No pre-treatment and brackets bonded with the etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Transbond XT). 2. Pre-treatment with fluoride-containing CPP-ACP paste (MI Paste Plus) and Transbond XT. 3. Pre-treatment with non-fluoride CPP-ACP paste (MI Paste) and Transbond XT.4. No pre-treatment and brackets bonded with the self-etching adhesive system (Transbond Plus). 5 and 6. Enamel pre-treated as for groups 2 and 3, respectively, and the Transbond Plus. Bonded specimens were subjected to thermal cycling (×1000) before SBS testing. The residual adhesive on the enamel surface was evaluated after debonding with the adhesive remnant index (ARI). Data evaluation was made using one-way analysis of variance and Tukey test for SBS results, and Kruskal-Wallis test for ARI results. The results showed that enamel pre-treatment with either fluoride or non-fluoride CPP-ACP paste had no significant effect on the SBS of the self-etching adhesive system (P > 0.05). Enamel pre-treatment with non-fluoride CPP-ACP in group 3 significantly reduced the SBS of the etch-and-rinse adhesive (P < 0.001), while pre-treatment with fluoride-containing CPP-ACP paste (groups 2 and 5) did not affect debonding values (P > 0.05). The fluoride-containing CPP-ACP did not compromise the SBS of brackets bonded with the tested etch-and-rinse and self-etching systems, but its non-fluoride version significantly decreased the SBS of the etch-and-rinse adhesive system.
    The European Journal of Orthodontics 02/2011; 34(2):193-7. · 1.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the effect of a recently introduced prophylactic agent, casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP), on shear bond strength of brackets and compare it with the effect of acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF). Forty-eight freshly extracted mandibular bovine incisors were used. Teeth were randomly divided into four groups (n = 12) as follows: group 1 served as control, and no pretreatment was performed on the enamel; group 2, enamel was treated with 1.23% APF and CPP-ACP, respectively; group 3, enamel was treated with CPP-ACP; and group 4, enamel was treated with 1.23% APF for 4 minutes. In all groups, brackets were bonded using a conventional acid-etch and bond system (Transbond XT, 3M Unitek, Monrovia, Calif). Bonded specimens were first stored in deionized water at 37 degrees C for 24 hours, subjected to thermal cycling for 1000 cycles, and further stored in distilled water for 6 weeks before debonding procedures. After debonding, teeth and brackets were examined under a stereomicroscope at 10x magnification for any adhesive remaining, in accordance with the modified adhesive remnant index. The shear bond strengths of all experimental groups were significantly higher than that of the control group (P < .01). There was no significant difference between the shear bond strengths of the experimental groups (P > .05). The use of CPP-ACP either alone or combined with APF could be considered as an alternative prophylactic application in orthodontic practice since it did not compromise bracket bond strength.
    The Angle Orthodontist 01/2008; 78(1):129-33. · 1.28 Impact Factor