Yu-Hao Zhou

Shanghai Putuo District People's Hospital, Shanghai, Shanghai Shi, China

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Publications (20)69.53 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to summarize the current evidence on the strength of associations between tea consumption and the incidence of cancer at different sites. We searched PubMed, Embase and the Cochrane Library for relevant articles published before October 2013. Prospective studies that reported effect estimates of cancer incidence, with 95% confidence intervals (CIs), for more than two categories of tea consumption were included. We analysed 87 datasets (57 articles), which included a total of 49 812 incident cases. Overall, high tea consumption had no significant effect on the risk of gastric, rectal, colon, lung, pancreatic, liver, breast, prostate, ovarian, bladder cancers or gliomas. However, high tea consumption was associated with a reduced risk of oral cancer (risk ratio 0.72; 95% CI 0.54-0.95; P=0.021). A dose-response meta-analysis suggested that an increase in tea consumption by one cup per day was associated with a reduced risk of oral cancer (risk ratio 0.89; 95% CI 0.80-0.98; P=0.022), but had little effect on the incidence of other cancers. Subgroup analysis indicated that an increase in the consumption of black tea by one cup per day was associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. Moreover, in western countries, we found that an increase in the consumption of tea by one cup per day was associated with a reduced risk of bladder cancer. Increased tea consumption has no significant effect on the risk of common malignancies. For some cancer types, associations differ according to sex, ethnicity and tea type.
    European journal of cancer prevention: the official journal of the European Cancer Prevention Organisation (ECP) 11/2014; · 2.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Studies that investigated the association between tea consumption and the risk of major cardiovascular events have reported inconsistent results. We conducted a meta-analysis of prospective observational studies in order to summarize the evidence regarding the association between tea consumption and major cardiovascular outcomes or total mortality. In July 2014, we performed electronic searches in PubMed, EmBase, and the Cochrane Library, followed by manual searches of reference lists from the resulting articles to identify other relevant studies. Prospective observational studies that reported effect estimates, with 95 % confidence intervals (CIs), for coronary heart disease (CHD), stroke, cardiac death, stroke death, or total mortality for more than two dosages of tea consumption were included. A random-effects meta-analysis was performed to determine the risk of major cardiovascular outcomes associated with an increase in tea consumption by 3 cups per day. Of the 736 citations identified from database searches, we included 22 prospective studies from 24 articles reporting data on 856,206 individuals, and including 8,459 cases of CHD, 10,572 of stroke, 5,798 cardiac deaths, 2,350 stroke deaths, and 13,722 total deaths. Overall, an increase in tea consumption by 3 cups per day was associated with a reduced risk of CHD (relative risk [RR], 0.73; 95 % CI: 0.53-0.99; P = 0.045), cardiac death (RR, 0.74; 95 % CI: 0.63-0.86; P < 0.001), stroke (RR, 0.82; 95 % CI: 0.73-0.92; P = 0.001), total mortality (RR, 0.76; 95 % CI: 0.63-0.91; P = 0.003), cerebral infarction (RR, 0.84; 95 % CI: 0.72-0.98; P = 0.023), and intracerebral hemorrhage (RR, 0.79; 95 % CI: 0.72-0.87; P < 0.001), but had little or no effect on stroke mortality (RR, 0.93; 95 % CI: 0.83-1.05; P = 0.260). The findings from this meta-analysis indicate that increased tea consumption is associated with a reduced risk of CHD, cardiac death, stroke, cerebral infarction, and intracerebral hemorrhage, as well as total mortality.
    European Journal of Epidemiology 10/2014; · 5.12 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Alcohol intake is inconsistently associated with the risk of stroke morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this study was to summarize the evidence regarding this relationship by using a dose-response meta-analytic approach. We performed electronic searches of PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library to identify relevant prospective studies. Only prospective studies that reported effect estimates with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of stroke morbidity and mortality for more than 2 categories of alcohol intake were included. We included 27 prospective studies reporting data on 1,425,513 individuals. Low alcohol intake was associated with a reduced risk of total stroke (risk ratio [RR], 0.85; 95% CI: 0.75-0.95; P=0.005), ischemic stroke (RR, 0.81; 95% CI: 0.74-0.90; P<0.001), and stroke mortality (RR, 0.67; 95% CI: 0.53-0.85; P=0.001), but it had no significant effect on hemorrhagic stroke. Moderate alcohol intake had little or no effect on the risks of total stroke, hemorrhagic stroke, ischemic stroke, and stroke mortality. Heavy alcohol intake was associated with an increased risk of total stroke (RR, 1.20; 95% CI: 1.01-1.43; P=0.034), but it had no significant effect on hemorrhagic stroke, ischemic stroke, and stroke mortality. Low alcohol intake is associated with a reduced risk of stroke morbidity and mortality, whereas heavy alcohol intake is associated with an increased risk of total stroke. The association between alcohol intake and stroke morbidity and mortality is J-shaped.
    International journal of cardiology 04/2014; · 6.18 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Omega-3 fatty acids are known to prevent cardiac death. However, previous observational studies have suggested that omega-3 fatty acids are associated with cancer risk in adults. We conducted a meta-analysis based on randomized controlled trials to evaluate the effect of omega-3 fatty acids on the risk of cancer incidence, nonvascular death, and total mortality. In February 2013, we performed electronic searches in PubMed, EmBase, and the Cochrane Library to identify randomized controlled trials on cancer incidence, nonvascular death, and total mortality. Relative risk (RR) was used to measure the effect of omega-3 fatty acid supplementation on the risk of cancer incidence, nonvascular death, and total mortality using a random-effect model. The analysis was further stratified by factors that could affect the treatment effects. Of the 8,746 identified articles, we included 19 trials reporting data on 68,954 individuals. These studies reported 1,039 events of cancer, 2,439 events of nonvascular death, and 7,025 events of total mortality. Omega-3 fatty acid supplementation had no effect on cancer incidence (RR, 1.10; 95%CI: 0.97-1.24; P = 0.12), nonvascular death (RR, 1.00; 95%CI: 0.93-1.08; P = 1.00), or total mortality (RR, 0.95; 95%CI: 0.88-1.03; P = 0.24) when compared to a placebo. Subgroup analysis indicated that omega-3 fatty acid supplementation was associated with a reduction in total mortality risk if the proportion of men in the study population was more than 80%, or participants received alpha-linolenic acid. Omega-3 fatty acid supplementation does not have an effect on cancer incidence, nonvascular death, or total mortality.
    BMC Public Health 02/2014; 14(1):204. · 2.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Statins are commonly used to lower total cholesterol levels in the general population to prevent cardiovascular events. However, the effects of statins in patients with chronic kidney disease remain unclear. We therefore performed a meta-analysis to assess the effects of statin therapy on cardiovascular outcomes in patients with mild to moderate chronic kidney disease. We systematically searched PubMed, EmBase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, proceedings of major meetings, and reference lists of articles for relevant literature. Only randomized clinical trials were included. Outcomes analysed included cardiovascular disease, total mortality, myocardial infarction, stroke, cardiovascular death, and possible drug-related adverse events. Subgroup analyses were also performed based on the population characteristics and clinical indexes. Twelve trials met our inclusion criteria. Overall, statin therapy resulted in a 24% reduction in the risk of cardiovascular disease (RR = 0.76,95% confidence interval [CI], 0.72- 0.80), a 21% reduction in the risk of total mortality (RR = 0.79,95% CI, 0.72-0.86), a 34% reduction in the risk of myocardial infarction (RR = 0.66,95% CI, 0.52-0.83), a 30% reduction in the risk of stroke (RR = 0.70,95% CI, 0.57-0.85), and a 17% reduction in the risk of cardiovascular mortality (RR = 0.83,95% CI, 0.73- 0.93). No statistically significant drug-related adverse events were noted. Subgroup analysis indicated that some important factors such as baseline creatinine level >=1.5 mg/dL, baseline glomerular filtration rate (GFR), and cardiovascular disease history could affect cardiovascular outcomes. Statin therapy had a clear effect on cardiovascular disease, total mortality, stroke, and myocardial infarction in patients with mild to moderate renal disease. Subgroup analysis indicated that baseline GFR, baseline creatinine level, and a history of cardiovascular disease might play an important role in the cardiovascular outcomes.
    BMC Cardiovascular Disorders 02/2014; 14(1):19. · 1.46 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Studies have reported inconsistent results regarding the existence of an association between folate intake and the risk of lung cancer. The purpose of this study was to summarize the evidence from prospective cohort studies regarding this relationship by using a dose-response meta-analytic approach. In September 2013, we performed electronic searches in PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library to identify studies examining the effect of folate intake on the incidence of lung cancer. Only prospective cohort studies that reported the effect estimates about the incidence of lung cancer with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for more than 2 categories of folate intake were included. Overall, we examined 9 cohort studies reporting the data of 566,921 individuals. High folate intake had little effect on the risk of lung cancer (risk ratio [RR], 0.92; 95% CI, 0.84-1.01; P = 0.076). Dose-response meta-analysis also suggested that a 100 µg/day increase in folate intake had no significant effect on the risk of lung cancer (RR, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.97-1.01; P = 0.318). Subgroup analysis suggested that the potential protective effect of low folate intake (100-299 µg/day) was more evident in women than men, while the opposite was true of high folate intake (>400 µg/day). Finally, subgroup analyses of a 100 µg/day increment in folate intake indicated that its potential protective effect was more evident in men than in women. Our study revealed that folate intake had little or no effect on the risk of lung cancer. Subgroup analyses indicated that an increased folate intake was associated with a reduced risk of lung cancer in men. Furthermore, low folate intake may be a protective factor for women, and high folate intake for men.
    PLoS ONE 01/2014; 9(4):e93465. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Studies have reported inconsistent results for the existence of an association between polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) intake and risk of lung cancer. The purpose of this study is to summarize the evidence regarding this relationship using a dose response meta-analytic approach.
    PLoS ONE 01/2014; 9(6):e99637. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Observational studies suggest that B vitamin supplementation reduces cardiovascular risk in adults, but this association remains controversial. This study aimed to summarize the evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) investigating B vitamin supplementation for the primary or secondary prevention of major adverse cardiovascular outcomes and to perform a cumulative meta-analysis to determine the evidence base.
    PLoS ONE 01/2014; 9(9):e107060. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Whether calcium or vitamin D supplementation reduces serious vascular outcomes in older people remains unclear. We conducted a meta-analysis based on randomized controlled trials to evaluate the effect of calcium or vitamin D supplementation on the risk of major cardiovascular outcomes. We performed electronic searches in PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library to identify relevant randomized controlled trials. Odds ratios (ORs) were used to measure the effect of calcium or vitamin D supplementation on the risk of major vascular outcomes with a random-effect model. Of the 1643 identified studies, we included 11 trials reporting data on 50,252 individuals. These studies reported 2685 major cardiovascular events, 1097 events of myocardial infarction, and 1350 events of stroke. Calcium or vitamin D supplementation did not have an effect on major cardiovascular events (OR, 1.03; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.94-1.12; P=0.54), myocardial infarction (OR, 1.08; 95% CI: 0.96-1.22; P=0.21), or stroke (OR, 1.01; 95% CI: 0.91-1.13; P=0.80) when compared to the effect with a placebo. Subgroup analysis indicated that calcium supplementation alone might play an important role in increasing the risk of major cardiovascular events, myocardial infarction, and stroke, but this difference could not be identified as statistically significant. Furthermore, males seem to experience more harmful effects with supplements of calcium or vitamin D than the effects experienced by females. Calcium supplementation might increase the risk of major cardiovascular events, myocardial infarction, and stroke compared to the risk with a placebo.
    International journal of cardiology 08/2013; · 6.18 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Fibrates has been extensively used to improve plasma lipid levels and prevent adverse cardiovascular outcomes. However, the effect of fibrates on stroke is unclear at the present time. We therefore carried out a comprehensive systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate the effects of fibrates on stroke. METHODS: We systematically searched Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, reference lists of articles, and proceedings of major meetings to identify studies for our analysis. We included randomized placebo controlled trials which reported the effects of fibrates on stroke. Relative risk (RR) was used to measure the effect of fibrates on the risk of stroke under random effect model. The analysis was further stratified by factors that could affect the treatment effects. RESULTS: Overall, fibrate therapy was not associated with a significant reduction on the risk of stroke (RR, 1.02, 95%CI, 0.90 to 1.16, P = 0.78). In the subgroup analyses, we observed that gemfibrozil therapy showed a beneficial effect on stroke (RR, 0.72, 95%CI, 0.53 to 0.98, P = 0.04). Similarly, fibrate therapy comparing to placebo had no effect on the incidence of fatal stroke. Subgroup analysis suggested that fibrate therapy showed an effect on fatal stroke when the Jadad score more than 3 (RR, 0.41, 95%CI, 0.17 to 1.00, P = 0.049). Furthermore, a sensitivity analysis indicated that fibrate therapy may play a role in fatal stroke (RR, 0.49, 95%CI, 0.26 to 0.93, P = 0.03) for patients with previous diabetes, cardiovascular disease or stroke. CONCLUSIONS: Our study indicated that fibrate therapy might play an important role in reducing the risk of fatal stroke in patients with previous diabetes, cardiovascular disease or stroke. However, it did not have an effect on the incidence of stroke.
    BMC Neurology 01/2013; 13(1):1. · 2.56 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: B vitamins have been extensively used to reduce homocysteine levels; however, it remains uncertain whether B vitamins are associated with a reduced risk of stroke. Our aim was to evaluate the effects of B vitamins on stroke. We systematically searched PubMed, EmBase, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials to identify studies for our analysis. Relative risk (RR) was used to measure the effect of B-vitamin supplementation on the risk of stroke. The analysis was further stratified based on factors that could affect the treatment effects. Of the 13,124 identified articles, we included 18 trials reporting data on 57,143 individuals and 2,555 stroke events. B-vitamin supplementation was not associated with a significant reduction in the risk of stroke (RR, 0.91, 95%CI: 0.82-1.01, P = 0.075; RD, -0.003, 95%CI: -0.007-0.001, P = 0.134). Subgroup analyses suggested that B-vitamin supplementation might reduce the risk of stroke if included trials had a man/woman ratio of more than 2 or subjects received dose of folic acid less than 1 mg. Furthermore, in a cumulative meta-analysis for stroke, the originally proposed nonsignificant B-vitamin effect was refuted by the evidence accumulated up to 2006. There is a small effect with borderline statistical significance based on data gathered since 2007. Our study indicates that B-vitamin supplementation is not associated with a lower risk of stroke based on relative and absolute measures of association. Subgroup analyses suggested that B-vitamin supplementation can effectively reduce the risk of stroke if included trials had a man/woman ratio of more than 2 or subjects received dose of folic acid less than 1 mg.
    PLoS ONE 01/2013; 8(11):e81577. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The efficacy of treatments that lower glucose in reducing the risk of incident stroke remains unclear. We therefore did a systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate the efficacy of intensive control of glucose in the prevention of stroke. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We systematically searched Medline, EmBase, and the Cochrane Library for trials published between 1950 and June, 2012. We included randomized controlled trials that reported on the effects of intensive control of glucose on incident stroke compared with standard care. Summary estimates of relative risk (RR) reductions were calculated with a random effects model, and the analysis was further stratified by factors that could affect the treatment effects. Of 649 identified studies, we included nine relevant trials, which provided data for 59197 patients and 2037 events of stroke. Overall, intensive control of glucose as compared to standard care had no effect on incident stroke (RR, 0.96; 95%CI 0.88-1.06; P = 0.445). In the stratified analyses, a beneficial effect was seen in those trials when body mass index (BMI) more than 30 (RR, 0.86; 95%CI: 0.75-0.99; P = 0.041). No other significant differences were detected between the effect of intensive control of glucose and standard care when based on other subset factors. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study indicated intensive control of glucose can effectively reduce the risk of incident stroke when patients with BMI more than 30.
    PLoS ONE 01/2013; 8(1):e54465. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Abciximab is a widely used adjunctive therapy for acute coronary syndrome (ACS). However, the effect of intracoronary (IC) administration of abciximab on cardiovascular events remains unclear when compared with intravenous (IV) therapy. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We systematically searched the Medline, Embase, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases and reference lists of articles and proceedings of major meetings for obtaining relevant literature. All eligible trials included ACS patients who received either IC administration of abciximab or IV therapy. The primary outcome was major cardiovascular events, and secondary outcomes included total mortality, reinfarction, and any possible adverse events. Of 660 identified studies, we included 9 trials reporting data on 3916 ACS patients. Overall, IC administration of abciximab resulted in 45% reduction in relative risk for major cardiovascular events (RR; 95% confidence interval [CI], 24-60%), 41% reduction in RR for reinfarction (95% CI, 7-63%), and 44% reduction in RR for congestive heart failure relative to IV therapy (95% CI, 8-66%); however, compared to IV therapy, IC administration of abciximab had no effect on total mortality (RR, 0.69; 95% CI, 0.45-1.07). No other significant differences were identified between the effect of IC abciximab administration and IV therapy. CONCLUSIONSSIGNIFICANCE: IC administration of abciximab can reduce the risk of major cardiovascular events, reinfarction, and congestive heart failure when compared with IV therapy.
    PLoS ONE 01/2013; 8(2):e58077. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Previous trials have shown that zinc supplementation can decrease the risk of diarrhea, pneumonia, and malaria in children; however, the effects of zinc supplementation on mortality remain unclear. This study aimed at evaluating the benefits and risks of zinc supplementation on both total mortality and cause-specific mortality. We searched PubMed, EmBase, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials to identify randomized controlled trials in preschool children reporting total mortality or cause-specific mortality. Relative risk (RR) was used as a measure of the effect of zinc supplementation on the risk of mortality using a random effect model. Of the 1,520 identified articles, we included 8 trials reporting data on 87,854 children. Overall, zinc supplementation had no effect on total mortality (RR, 0.76; 95% CI: 0.56-1.04; P = 0.084), diarrhea-related mortality (RR, 0.80; 95% CI: 0.53-1.20; P = 0.276), pneumonia-related mortality (RR, 0.52; 95% CI: 0.11-2.39; P = 0.399), malaria-related mortality (RR, 0.90; 95% CI: 0.77-1.06; P = 0.196), or other causes of mortality (RR, 0.98; 95% CI: 0.67-1.44; P = 0.917). Subgroup analysis indicated that zinc supplementation was associated with a reduction in total mortality risk if the participants were boys, aged greater than 12 months, and the duration of the follow-up period was less than 12 months. Zinc supplementation does not have an effect on total mortality, diarrhea-related mortality, pneumonia-related mortality, malaria-related mortality, or other causes of mortality. Subgroup analysis suggested that zinc supplementation can effectively reduce the risk of total mortality if the participants were boys, aged greater than 12 months, and the duration of the follow-up period was less than 12 months.
    PLoS ONE 01/2013; 8(11):e79998. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Aspirin and clopidogrel monotherapies are effective treatments for preventing vascular disease. However, new evidence has emerged regarding the use of combined aspirin and clopidogrel therapy to prevent cardiovascular events. We therefore performed a comprehensive systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate the benefits and harms of combined aspirin and clopidogrel therapy on major cardiovascular outcomes. We systematically searched Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, reference lists of articles, and proceedings of major meetings to identify studies to fit our analysis. Eligible studies were randomized controlled trials assessing the effect of combined aspirin and clopidogrel therapy compared with aspirin or clopidogrel monotherapy. We identified 7 trials providing data with a total of 48248 patients. These studies reported 5134 major cardiovascular events, 1626 myocardial infarctions, 1927 strokes, and 1147 major bleeding events. Overall, the addition of aspirin to clopidogrel therapy as compared to single drug therapy resulted in a 9% RR reduction (95%CI, 2 to 17) in major cardiovascular events, 14% RR reduction (95%CI, 3 to 24) in myocardial infarction, 16% RR reduction (95%CI, 1 to 28) in stroke, and 62% RR increase (95%CI, 26 to 108) in major bleeding events. We also present the data as ARR to explore net value as the reduction in cardiovascular events. Overall, we observed that combined therapy yielded 1.06% decrease (95%CI, 0.23% to 1.99%) in major cardiovascular events and 1.23% increase (95%CI, 0.52% to 2.14%) in major bleeding events. Although the addition of aspirin to clopidogrel resulted in small relative reductions in major cardiovascular events, myocardial infarction, and stroke, it also resulted in a relative increase in major bleeding events. In absolute terms the benefits of combined therapy, a 1.06% reduction in major cardiovascular events, does not outweigh the harms, a 1.23% increase in major bleeding events.
    PLoS ONE 02/2012; 7(2):e31642. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Anti-obesity drugs are widely used to prevent the complications of obesity, however, the effects of anti-obesity drugs on cardiovascular risk factors are unclear at the present time. We carried out a comprehensively systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the effects of anti-obesity drugs on cardiovascular risk factors. We systematically searched Medline, EmBase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, reference lists of articles and proceedings of major meetings for relevant literatures. We included randomized placebo-controlled trials that reported the effects of anti-obesity drugs on cardiovascular risk factors compared to placebo. Overall, orlistat produced a reduction of 2.39 kg (95%CI-3.34 to -1.45) for weight, a reduction of 0.27 mmol/L (95%CI: -0.36 to -0.17) for total cholesterol, a reduction of 0.21 mmol/L (95%CI: -0.30 to -0.12) for LDL, a reduction of 0.12 mmol/L (95%CI: -0.20 to -0.04) for fasting glucose, 1.85 mmHg reduction (95%CI: -3.30 to -0.40) for SBP, and a reduction of 1.49 mmHg (95%CI: -2.39 to -0.58) for DBP. Sibutramine only showed effects on weight loss and triglycerides reduction with statistical significances. Rimonabant was associated with statistically significant effects on weight loss, SBP reduction and DBP reduction. No other significantly different effects were identified between anti-obesity therapy and placebo. We identified that anti-obesity therapy was associated with a decrease of weight regardless of the type of the drug. Orlistat and rimonabant could lead to an improvement on cardiovascular risk factors. However, Sibutramine may have a direct effect on cardiovascular risk factors.
    PLoS ONE 01/2012; 7(6):e39062. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Studies have shown that steroids can improve kidney survival and decrease the risk of proteinuria in patients with Immunoglobulin A nephropathy, but the overall benefit of steroids in the treatment of Immunoglobulin A nephropathy remains controversial. The aim of this study was to evaluate the benefits and risks of steroids for renal survival in adults with Immunoglobulin A nephropathy. We searched the Cochrane Renal Group Specialized Register, Cochrane Controlled Trial Registry, MEDLINE and EMBASE databases. All eligible studies were measuring at least one of the following outcomes: end-stage renal failure, doubling of serum creatinine and urinary protein excretion. Fifteen relevant trials (n = 1542) that met our inclusion criteria were identified. In a pooled analysis, steroid therapy was associated with statistically significant reduction of the risk in end-stage renal failure (RR: 0.46, 95% CI: 0.27 to 0.79), doubling of serum creatinine (RR = 0.34, 95%CI = 0.15 to 0.77) and reduced urinary protein excretion (MD = -0.47 g/day, 95%CI = -0.64 to -0.31). We identified that steroid therapy was associated with a decrease of proteinuria and with a statistically significant reduction of the risk in end-stage renal failure. Moreover, subgroup analysis also suggested that long-term steroid therapy had a higher efficiency than standard and short term therapy.
    PLoS ONE 01/2011; 6(4):e18788. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: When assessing the agreement of two methods, the simple correlation coefficient, the most frequently used but easy to cause misleading interpretation of results, is still comprehensively adopted in journals of clinical chemistry or diagnostic laboratory. This study is aimed at comparing the correlation coefficient with the alternative method, which came from FDA recommended guidance for waiver assays--Allowable Total Error (ATE)/Limits for Erroneous Results (LER) zones, and fully addressing the applicable conditions of the later one. The data we use were both real and simulated data to calculate correlation coefficient and ATE/LER zones, respectively, when assessing the agreement. And a modified ATE/LER zones method was brought forward to assess the agreement of repeated measurements and the repeatability of each single method. The high correlation can only indicate that the two methods are linearly related rather than in agreement with each other. However, the ATE/LER zones can avoid this shortcoming by using certain statistical strategies considering the clinical judgment. The modified method is suitable to evaluate the repeatability of single method and the agreement of repeated measurement by two measuring methods. The ATE/LER zones method is a relatively reasonable and widely considering method for assessing the agreement.
    Journal of Clinical Laboratory Analysis 01/2011; 25(2):83-9. · 1.36 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Taxanes have been extensively used as adjuvant chemotherapy for the treatment of early or operable breast cancer, particularly in high risk, node-negative breast cancer. Previous studies, however, have reported inconsistent findings regarding their clinical efficacy and safety. We investigated disease-free survival (DFS), overall survival (OS), and drug-related toxicities of taxanes by a systematic review and meta-analysis. We systematically searched PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Center Register of Controlled Trials, proceedings of major meetings, and reference lists of articles for studies conducted between January 1980 and April 2011. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing chemotherapy with and without taxanes in the treatment of patients with early-stage or operable breast cancer were eligible for inclusion in our analysis. The primary endpoint was DFS. Nineteen RCTs including 30698 patients were identified, including 8426 recurrence events and 3803 deaths. Taxanes administration yielded a 17% reduction of hazard ratio (HR) for DFS (HR = 0.83, 95% CI 0.79-0.88, p<0.001) and a 17% reduction of HR for OS (HR = 0.83, 95% CI 0.77-0.90, p<0.001). For high risk, node-negative breast cancer, the pooled HR also favoured the taxane-based treatment arm over the taxane-free treatment arm (HR = 0.82, 95% CI 0.77-0.87, p = 0.022). A significantly increased rate of neutropenia, febrile neutropenia, fatigue, diarrhea, stomatitis, and oedema was observed in the taxane-based treatment arm. Adjuvant chemotherapy with taxanes could reduce the risk of cancer recurrence and death in patients with early or operable breast cancer, although the drug-related toxicities should be balanced. Furthermore, we also demonstrated that patients with high risk, node-negative breast cancer also benefited from taxanes therapy, a result that was not observed in previous studies.
    PLoS ONE 01/2011; 6(11):e26946. · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Folic acid is widely used to lower homocysteine concentrations and prevent adverse cardiovascular outcomes. However, the effect of folic acid on cardiovascular events is not clear at the present time. We carried out a comprehensive systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the effects of folic acid supplementation on cardiovascular outcomes. We systematically searched Medline, EmBase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, reference lists of articles, and proceedings of major meetings for relevant literature. We included randomized placebo-controlled trials that reported on the effects of folic acid on cardiovascular events compared to placebo. Of 1594 identified studies, we included 16 trials reporting data on 44841 patients. These studies reported 8238 major cardiovascular events, 2001 strokes, 2917 myocardial infarctions, and 6314 deaths. Folic acid supplementation as compared to placebo had no effect on major cardiovascular events (RR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.93-1.04), stroke (RR, 0.89; 95% CI,0.78-1.01), myocardial infarction (RR, 1.00; 95% CI, 0.93-1.07), or deaths from any cause (RR, 1.00;95% CI, 0.96-1.05). Moreover, folic acid as compared to placebo also had no effect on the following secondary outcomes: risk of revascularization (RR, 1.05; 95%CI, 0.95-1.16), acute coronary syndrome (RR, 1.06; 95%CI, 0.97-1.15), cancer (RR, 1.08; 95%CI, 0.98-1.21), vascular death (RR, 0.94; 95%CI,0.88-1.02), or non-vascular death (RR, 1.06; 95%CI, 0.97-1.15). Folic acid supplementation does not effect on the incidence of major cardiovascular events, stroke, myocardial infarction or all cause mortality.
    PLoS ONE 01/2011; 6(9):e25142. · 3.53 Impact Factor