Wenjun Chris Zhang

University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

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Publications (6)5.81 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The overwhelming growth in the struggle between economy and ecology has led managerial research to promote methodologies to reap profits ensuring sustainability of the ecosystem thus venturing into the novel domain incorporating sustainability with supply chain management and coordination. In this paper, we look for a synergetic alliance between the environmental and commercial benefits by establishing coordination between the producer and the retailer to adjudicate their strategies to trigger green practices with the focus on maximizing economic profits by leveraging upon the product’s greenness. A two player game has been developed to stand synonymous to the situation considered. Special considerations have been devised to augment the analysis with the consumer psychology towards the green products to establish a practical outlook involving the greenness and economic returns. Evolutionary dynamics has been adopted extensively to locate the optimal and the most stable point offering the best economic gains. The economically suitable solutions are then substantiated on an existing sustainability metric and hence we aim to offer a holistic view into supply chain dynamics from the perspective of environmental management. The insights drawn provide managerial implications and advantages of having environment as a key focus along with business motives.
  • Long Cheng, Zeng-Guang Hou, Yingzi Lin, Min Tan, Wenjun Chris Zhang
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    ABSTRACT: A distributed protocol is proposed for a modified consensus problem of a network of agents that have the same continuous-time linear dynamics. Each agent estimates its own state using its output information and then sends the estimated state to its neighbor agents for the purpose of reaching a consensus. The modified consensus problem requires the group decision value to be a linear function of initial states and initial estimated states of all agents in the network, and the transformation matrix associated with this linear function not to be a zero matrix. It is proved that under the proposed control protocol, the modified consensus problem can be solved if and only if the system matrices of the agent’s dynamics are stabilizable and detectable, the input matrix is not a zero matrix, and the communication topology graph has a spanning tree. The proposed protocol can also be extended to multi-agent systems where agents are described by discrete-time linear dynamics. The corresponding necessary and sufficient conditions are provided as well.
    Automatica 10/2011; 47(10):2218-2223. DOI:10.1016/j.automatica.2011.03.014 · 3.13 Impact Factor
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    Shrey Modi, M. K. Tiwari, Yingzi Lin, Wenjun Chris Zhang
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    ABSTRACT: With an increasing role of computers in the design process, a strong foundation of the basic principles for building CAD systems is extremely necessary. This work describes the architecture of a CAD system from the perspective of the capabilities required to build a human centered CAD system. These capabilities have been reported as task-sharing, communication, transparency, design rationale and cognition. Existing systems for engineering design have been analyzed from the perspective of these capabilities and an agent-based system previously reported in literature has been extended to a new architecture to support three of the aforementioned capabilities. The proposed architecture is an amalgamation of multi-agent systems, the ACT-R cognitive architecture and fuzzy rule based Petri nets. The salient advantage of this architecture is that it focuses on the capabilities of design rationale, transparency and cognition together—something which has been missing from all the current works in literature and is unique to the domain of application of the software system, which in this case is engineering design. The other capabilities namely task sharing and communication can be incorporated from lessons learnt from human–computer interaction research. The effectiveness of the proposed architecture is demonstrated by a hypothetical design case along with its implementation.
    Computer-Aided Design 02/2011; 43:170-179. DOI:10.1016/j.cad.2010.10.006 · 1.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A new heuristic is proposed as a modification to the clonal selection based algorithm called the CLONALG of Artificial Immune Systems. In the CLONALG algorithm, the objective function values of the antibodies are used as an index for affinity, selection and mutation. It does not include a specified set of antigens to solve optimization problems. This mere use of objective function values hinders the utilization of the pattern recognition and adaptation ability of the Immune systems principles. Therefore, in the proposed heuristic, a Structural Similarity Index (SSI) is introduced as an additional criterion to facilitate the antibodies in exploiting the solution structures of antigens and clone accordingly. A hypothetical example problem from an automotive industry is solved to illustrate the application of the proposed heuristic and the results are compared with those obtained using the CLONALG algorithm. The comparison revealed that proposed solution methodology has a faster convergence pattern than the original CLONALG algorithm in solving the type of the underlying optimization problem.
    01/2009
  • Deepak Shukla, M. K. Tiwari, Wenjun Chris Zhang
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    ABSTRACT: Risks assessment in capacity expansion project is governed by large number of complex factors. Traditionally, tools like risk registers, risk management spreadsheets, brain storming sessions, individual decisions and so on are used to identify risks in these projects. As a result, many risks remain unidentified, and avoiding failure becomes impossible. Our work aims to resolve this dilemma of decision maker by providing a tool based on text mining and ontology driven approach to assist a decision maker not only by providing all the risks and their prevention measures that can emerge after and during capacity building project but also by evaluating cost associated with them. By including the cost, our model is more realistic in practice. This paper introduces the software we prototyped to achieve our goal.
    01/2009
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    Yingzi Lin, Wenjun Chris Zhang
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    ABSTRACT: In designing a human-computer interface (interface for short) for a complex work domain, the first question to be answered is what information should be presented on the interface display. The simplest answer may be: it depends on tasks to be performed by the human operator. In the past two decades, several studies towards a satisfactory answer to this question have been reported in literature, among which a study called ecological interface design framework is most sound. Motivated by a discussion with a nuclear power plant builder (in Canada) five years ago, we have conducted a study on the interface framework and obtained very interesting results. One of the salient findings is that the current implementation of the notion of the abstract function in the ecological interface design framework is worthy of further exploration. More fundamentally, one of its basic methods, called the five-level abstraction hierarchy used for work domain analysis, can be more commented on its architecture. Our findings are based on a critical analysis of published articles on the ecological interface design framework. We further postulated an alternative framework called function- behavior-state (FBS). We have conducted an experiment to compare these two frameworks, which positively supported our findings. The present article reports the critical analysis of the ecological interface design framework and describes the FBS framework. The experimental study has been reported separately in this journal.
    International Journal of Human-Computer Studies 09/2004; 61:259-297. DOI:10.1016/j.ijhcs.2003.11.008 · 1.17 Impact Factor