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Publications (4)5.51 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Many reports on purification of water containing pesticides are based on studies using unformulated active ingredients. However, most commercial formulations contain additives/adjuvants or are manufactured using microencapsulation which may influence the purification process. Therefore, the main objective of this work was to develop and test a pilot scheme for decontaminating water containing pesticides formulated with antifoaming/defoaming agents. The Freundlich adsorption coefficients of formulation of cyprodinil, a new-generation fungicide, onto the organoclay Cloisite 20A have been determined in the laboratory in order to predict the efficiency of this organoclay in removing the fungicide from waste spray-tank water. Subsequently, the adsorption tests were repeated in the pilot system in order to test the practical operation of the purification scheme. The laboratory adsorption tests successfully predicted the efficiency of the pilot purification system, which removed more than 96% cyprodinil over a few hours. The passing of the organoclay-cyprodinil suspension through a layer of biomass gave 100% recovery of the organoclay at the surface of the biomass after 1 week. The organoclay was composted after the treatment to try to break down the fungicide so as to allow safe disposal of the waste, but cyprodinil was not significantly dissipated after 90 days. The purification scheme proved to be efficient for decontaminating water containing cyprodinil formulated with antifoaming/defoaming agents, but additional treatments for the adsorbed residues still appear to be necessary even for a moderately persistent pesticide such as cyprodinil. Furthermore, a significant conclusion of this study concerns the high influence of pesticide formulations on the process of purification of water containing these compounds, which should be taken into account when developing innovative decontamination schemes, especially for practical applications.
    Environmental Science and Pollution Research 11/2011; 19(4):1229-36. · 2.76 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The main objective of this work was to develop and test a pilot scheme for decontaminating pesticide-containing water derived from pesticide mixtures used to protect vineyards, in which the scheme comprises adsorption by an organoclay and includes a system where an enhanced or rapid microbial degradation of the adsorbed residues can occur. In laboratory experiments, the Freundlich adsorption coefficients of formulations of two fungicides, penconazole and cyazofamid, onto the organoclay Cloisite 20 A were measured in order to predict the efficiency of this organoclay in removing these fungicides from the waste spray-tank water. Subsequently, the adsorption tests were repeated in the pilot system in order to test the practical operation of the depuration scheme. The adsorption tests with the pilot system show 96% removal of both fungicides over a few hours, similar to the efficiency of removal predicted from the laboratory adsorption tests. The formulation type may influence the efficiency of clay recovered after adsorption. Regarding the waste disposal, for instance, the organoclay composted after the treatment, cyazofamid showed significant dissipation after 90 days, whereas the dissipation of penconazole was negligible. The depuration scheme developed showed to be efficient for decontaminating pesticide-containing water derived from vineyards, but additional treatments for the adsorbed residues still appear to be necessary for persistent pesticides. However, future decontamination research should be attempted for water contaminated with pesticides containing antifoaming agents in their formulations, in which case the present pilot system could not be applied.
    Environmental Science and Pollution Research 04/2011; 18(8):1374-83. · 2.76 Impact Factor
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    01/2011; La Goliardica Pavese., ISBN: 978-88-7830-515-1
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    ABSTRACT: Greenhouse gases emissions can be counterbalanced with proper agronomical strategies aimed at sequestering carbon in soils. These strategies must be tested not only for their ability in reducing carbon dioxide emissions, but also for their impact on soil quality: enzymatic activities are related to main soil ecological quality, and can be used as early and sensitive indicators of alteration events. Three different strategies for soil carbon sequestration were studied: minimum tillage, protection of biodegradable organic fraction by compost amendment and oxidative polimerization of soil organic matter catalyzed by biometic porfirins. All strategies were compared with a traditional agricultural management based on tillage and mineral fertilization. Experiments were carried out in three Italian soils from different pedo-climatic regions located respectively in Piacenza, Turin and Naples and cultivated with maize or wheat. Soil samples were taken for three consecutive years after harvest and analyzed for their content in phosphates, ß-glucosidase, urease and invertase. An alteration index based on these enzymatic activities levels was applied as well. The biomimetic porfirin application didn't cause changes in enzymatic activities compared to the control at any treatment or location. Enzymatic activities were generally higher in the minimum tillage and compost treatment, while differences between location and date of samplings were limited. Application of the soil alteration index based on enzymatic activities showed that soils treated with compost or subjected to minimum tillage generally have a higher biological quality. The work confirms the environmental sustainability of the carbon sequestering agronomical practices studied.
    01/2009;