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Publications (3)4.74 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To compare the efficacy and safety of alogliptin and placebo as add-on therapy in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes who experienced inadequate glycemic control on voglibose plus diet/exercise therapy. During an 8 week screening phase, patients aged ≥ 20 years were stabilized on voglibose 0.2 mg three times daily plus diet/exercise therapy. Those with HbA1c between ≥ 6.9% and <10.4% were randomly assigned to 12 weeks' double-blind treatment with once daily alogliptin 12.5 or 25 mg, or placebo. The primary endpoint was the change in HbA1c at 12 weeks from baseline. Patients then entered an open-label, 40 week extension trial (patients in the placebo group were randomly allocated to alogliptin 12.5 or 25 mg). www.clinicaltrials.gov ; pivotal trial NCT01263483; Long term trial NCT01263509. Least square mean change in HbA1c after 12 weeks' therapy from baseline (primary endpoint) was significantly greater in the alogliptin 12.5 mg (-0.96%; P < 0.0001) and 25 mg (-0.93%; P < 0.0001) groups compared with placebo (+0.06%). This was associated with statistically significant improvements in other measures of glycemic control, in particular sustained reductions in fasting plasma glucose and postprandial plasma glucose. These benefits were maintained for the duration of the 1 year study and, importantly, they were achieved without detrimental effects on tolerability/safety. In particular, there was no increase in the rate of hypoglycemia and almost no changes in mean body weight. Addition of once daily alogliptin to voglibose monotherapy in Japanese patients with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes produced clinically significant improvements in glycemic control, and was well tolerated.
    Current Medical Research and Opinion 11/2011; 27 Suppl 3:21-9. · 2.37 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To compare the efficacy and safety of different dosages of alogliptin with that of placebo and voglibose in drug-naïve Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled by diet and exercise. Research design and methods: In the double-blind, placebo-controlled phase of this two-part study, 480 patients aged ≥20 years with type 2 diabetes mellitus (HbA1c ≥6.9% to <10.4%) were randomized to monotherapy with alogliptin 6.25, 12.5, 25 or 50 mg once daily, placebo, or voglibose 0.2 mg three times daily for a period of 12 weeks. In a subsequent open-label, long-term extension phase, patients continued on the same treatment for an additional 40 weeks (patients in the placebo group were reassigned equally to one of the four alogliptin dosages). The primary efficacy endpoint was the change in HbA1c from the baseline value at week 12 of treatment. Safety endpoints were the occurrence of adverse events, vital sign measurements, physical examination and ECG findings, and laboratory test results recorded over the entire 52-week period. HbA1c was dose-dependently reduced by alogliptin, and the changes versus baseline were statistically significant with all four dosages in comparison with both placebo and voglibose. In addition, changes in fasting plasma glucose and postprandial plasma glucose AUC(0-2h) values were significantly greater with all four dosages of alogliptin in comparison with placebo. The incidence of adverse events with alogliptin over 52 weeks was not dose-dependent and was lower than with voglibose. Hypoglycemia occurred infrequently and was generally rated as mild. Changes in body weight with alogliptin were minimal (<0.5 kg) and not clinically meaningful. Alogliptin was well tolerated and dose-dependently improved glycemic parameters in patients with type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled on diet and exercise.
    Current Medical Research and Opinion 09/2011; 27(9):1781-92. · 2.37 Impact Factor
  • Koji Takeuchi, Tetsuya Fujita, Shinzo Hiroi
    Folia Pharmacologica Japonica 01/2011; 137(1):43-50.