Susan F Slovin

Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York City, New York, United States

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Publications (95)495.52 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Prostate cancer is often associated with metastases to bone and/or soft tissue. The progression to metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer is a seminal event in disease progression affecting treatment decisions. A multidisciplinary group was convened to review the currently available imaging guidelines for metastatic disease in prostate cancer and found no consensus on eligibility criteria, type of imaging modality, and the frequency of scanning for detecting metastatic disease. The aim of this review was to present the recommendations from the group to identify optimal strategies for early identification of metastases in patients with prostate cancer.
    Urology 01/2014; · 2.42 Impact Factor
  • Susan F Slovin
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    ABSTRACT: Antibodies administered either alone or in a unique construct that can enhance targeting, immunologic recognition and cell killing, remain an area of active interest for a variety of solid tumors. Prostate cancer has unique characteristics as a target for immune-mediated therapies, particularly since it has not only a wide array of antigens expressed on its cell surface, but also has an associated biomarker, which not only can monitor the disease status but also its response to therapy. A number of unique cell surface antigens, as well as internally mediated cell molecules, have shown their clinical activity and efficacy as prostate cancer treatments. The continued evolution of novel antibody-drug and antibody-imaging constructs will probably offer more efficient ways to deliver a therapeutic to the tumor and enhance imaging of active or treated sites of disease.
    Immunotherapy 12/2013; 5(12):1347-1355. · 2.39 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Human endogenous retroviruses (HERV) encode 8% of the human genome. While HERVs may play a role in autoimmune and neoplastic disease, no mechanistic association has yet been established. We studied the expression and immunogenicity of a HERV-K GAG protein encoded on chromosome 22q11.23 in relation to the clinical course of prostate cancer. Experimental design: In vitro expression of GAG-HERV-K was analyzed in panels of normal and malignant tissues, microarrays, and cell lines, and effects of demethylation and androgen stimulation were evaluated. Patient sera were analyzed for seroreactivity to GAG-HERV-K and other self-antigens by ELISA and seromics (protein array profiling). GAG-HERV-K expression was most frequent in prostate tissues, and regulated both by demethylation of the promoter region and by androgen stimulation. Serum screening revealed that antibodies to GAG-HERV-K are found in a subset of prostate cancer patients (33/483, 6.8%), but rarely in male healthy donors (1/55, 1.8%). Autoantibodies to GAG-HERV-K occurred more frequently in advanced prostate cancer patients (29/191 in stage III-IV, 21.0%) than in early prostate cancer (4/292 in stage I-II, 1.4%). Presence of GAG-HERV-K serum antibody was correlated with worse survival of prostate cancer patients, with a trend for faster biochemical recurrence in patients with antibodies to GAG-HERV-K. Preferential expression of GAG-HERV-K ch22q11.23 in prostate cancer tissue and increased frequency of autoantibodies observed in advanced prostate cancer patients make this protein one of the first bona fide retroviral cancer antigens in humans, with potential as a biomarker for progression and biochemical recurrence rate of prostate cancer.
    Clinical Cancer Research 09/2013; · 7.84 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: ARN-509 is a novel androgen receptor (AR) antagonist for the treatment of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). ARN-509 inhibits AR nuclear translocation and AR binding to androgen response elements and, unlike bicalutamide, does not exhibit agonist properties in the context of AR overexpression. This first-in-human phase I study assessed safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and antitumor activity of ARN-509 in men with metastatic CRPC. Thirty patients with progressive CRPC received continuous daily oral ARN-509 at doses between 30 and 480 mg, preceded by administration of a single dose followed by a 1-week observation period with pharmacokinetic sampling. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography imaging was conducted to monitor [(18)F]fluoro-α-dihydrotestosterone (FDHT) binding to AR in tumors before and during treatment. Primary objective was to determine pharmacokinetics, safety, and recommended phase II dose. Pharmacokinetics were linear and dose proportional. Prostate-specific antigen declines at 12 weeks (≥ 50% reduction from baseline) were observed in 46.7% of patients. Reduction in FDHT uptake was observed at all doses, with a plateau in response at ≥ 120-mg dose, consistent with saturation of AR binding. The most frequently reported adverse event was grade 1/2 fatigue (47%). One dose-limiting toxicity event (grade 3 abdominal pain) occurred at the 300-mg dose. Dose escalation to 480 mg did not identify a maximum-tolerated dose. ARN-509 was safe and well tolerated, displayed dose-proportional pharmacokinetics, and demonstrated pharmacodynamic and antitumor activity across all dose levels tested. A maximum efficacious dose of 240 mg daily was selected for phase II exploration based on integration of preclinical and clinical data.
    Journal of Clinical Oncology 09/2013; · 18.04 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: β-emitting bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals have historically been administered for pain palliation whereas docetaxel prolongs life in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). In combination, these agents simultaneously target the bone stroma and cancer cell to optimize antitumor effects. The toxicity and efficacy when each agent is combined at full, recommended doses, in a repetitive fashion is not well established. METHODS: Patients with progressive mCRPC and ≥3 bone lesions received (153) Sm-EDTMP (samarium-153 ethylene diamine tetramethylene phosphonate) at a dose of 1.0 mCi/kg every 9 weeks and docetaxel at a dose of 75 mg/m(2) every 3 weeks. In the absence of unacceptable toxicity, patients were allowed to continue additional cycles, defined by 9 weeks of treatment, until intolerance or biochemical/radiographic disease progression. RESULTS: Of the 30 patients treated, approximately 50% were considered to be taxane-naive, 36.7% were taxane-refractory, and 13.3% had previously been exposed to taxanes but were not considered refractory. Patients received on average 2.5 cycles of treatment (6.5 doses of docetaxel and 2.5 doses of (153) Sm-EDTMP). Twelve patients (40%) demonstrated a decline in their prostate-specific antigen level of ≥50%. The median progression-free survival (biochemical or radiographic) was 7.0 months and the overall survival was 14.3 months. Nine patients (30%) did not recover platelet counts >100 K/mm(3) after a median of 3 cycles to allow for additional treatment, with 4 patients experiencing prolonged thrombocytopenia. The most common reasons for trial discontinuation were progressive disease and hematologic toxicity. CONCLUSIONS: The results of the current study indicate that (153) Sm-EDTMP can be safely combined with docetaxel at full doses on an ongoing basis in patients with mCRPC. Although thrombocytopenia limited therapy for some patients, preliminary efficacy supports the strategy of combining a radiopharmaceutical with chemotherapy, which is an appealing strategy given the anticipated availability of α emitters that can prolong survival. Cancer 2013. © 2013 American Cancer Society.
    Cancer 06/2013; · 5.20 Impact Factor
  • Alexandra Snyder, Jaron E Tepper, Susan F Slovin
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    ABSTRACT: The goals of any cancer therapy are to improve disease control, palliate pain and improve overall survival. We are fortunate to have in our cancer armamentarium two new immune-directed therapies which not only impact on disease control but also on overall survival. The first, sipuleucel-T, a cellular-based vaccine, was approved for prostate cancer and was shown to be safe with minimal toxicity. The second, ipilimumab, a monoclonal antibody directed to an immunologic checkpoint molecule, showed a survival benefit in patients with advanced melanoma. Benefit appeared to correlate in some cases with the development of autoimmune events, signaling that the immune system is in overdrive against the cancer. Where we are and where we will likely go are the topics to be discussed in this review.
    Seminars in Oncology 06/2013; 40(3):347-360. · 4.33 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: (223)Ra-Dichloride ((223)Ra) is a novel bone-seeking alpha-emitter that prolongs survival in patients with castration-resistant metastatic prostate cancer. We conducted a study to better profile the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and biodistribution of this agent. METHODS: Ten patients received either 50, 100, or 200 kBq of (223)Ra per kilogram of body weight. Subsequently, six of these ten patients received a second dose of 50 kBq/kg. Pharmacokinetics and biodistribution were assessed by serial blood sampling, planar imaging, and whole-body counting. Pharmacodynamic assessment was based on measurements of prostate-specific antigen, bone alkaline phosphatase, and serum N-telopeptide. Safety was also assessed. RESULTS: Pharmacokinetic studies showed rapid clearance of (223)Ra from the vasculature, with a median of 14 % (range 9-34 %), 2 % (range 1.6-3.9 %), and 0.5 % (range 0.4-1.0 %) remaining in plasma at the end of infusion, after 4 h, and after 24 h, respectively. Biodistribution studies showed early passage into the small bowel and subsequent fecal excretion with a median of 52 % of administered (223)Ra in the bowel at 24 h. Urinary excretion was relatively minor (median of 4 % of administered (223)Ra). Bone retention was prolonged. No dose-limiting toxicity was observed. Pharmacodynamic effects were observed (alkaline phosphatase and serum N-telopeptides) in a significant fraction of patients. CONCLUSION: (223)Ra cleared rapidly from plasma and rapidly transited into small bowel, with fecal excretion the major route of elimination. Administered activities up to 200 kBq/kg were associated with few side effects and appeared to induce a decline in serum indicators of bone turnover.
    European Journal of Nuclear Medicine 05/2013; · 4.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background This phase I/II study in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) explored ipilimumab as monotherapy and in combination with radiotherapy, based on the preclinical evidence of synergistic antitumor activity between anti-CTLA-4 antibody and radiotherapy.Patients and methodsIn dose escalation, 33 patients (≥6/cohort) received ipilimumab every 3 weeks × 4 doses at 3, 5, or 10 mg/kg or at 3 or 10 mg/kg + radiotherapy (8 Gy/lesion). The 10-mg/kg cohorts were expanded to 50 patients (ipilimumab monotherapy, 16; ipilimumab + radiotherapy, 34). Evaluations included adverse events (AEs), prostate-specific antigen (PSA) decline, and tumor response.ResultsCommon immune-related AEs (irAEs) among the 50 patients receiving 10 mg/kg ± radiotherapy were diarrhea (54%), colitis (22%), rash (32%), and pruritus (20%); grade 3/4 irAEs included colitis (16%) and hepatitis (10%). One treatment-related death (5 mg/kg group) occurred. Among patients receiving 10 mg/kg ± radiotherapy, eight had PSA declines of ≥50% (duration: 3-13+ months), one had complete response (duration: 11.3+ months), and six had stable disease (duration: 2.8-6.1 months).Conclusions In mCRPC patients, ipilimumab 10 mg/kg ± radiotherapy suggested clinical antitumor activity with disease control and manageable AEs. Two phase III trials in mCRPC patients evaluating ipilimumab 10 mg/kg ± radiotherapy are ongoing. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00323882.
    Annals of Oncology 03/2013; · 7.38 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: PSMA-VRP is a propagation defective, viral replicon vector system encoding PSMA under phase I evaluation for patients with castration resistant metastatic prostate cancer (CRPC). The product is derived from an attenuated strain of the alphavirus, Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis (VEE) virus, and incorporates multiple redundant safety features. In this first in human trial, two cohorts of 3 patients with CRPC metastatic to bone were treated with up to five doses of either 0.9×10(7)IU or 0.36×10(8)IU of PSMA-VRP at weeks 1, 4, 7, 10 and 18, followed by an expansion cohort of 6 patients treated with 0.36×10(8)IU of PSMA-VRP at weeks 1, 4, 7, 10 and 18. No toxicities were observed. In the first dose cohort, no PSMA specific cellular immune responses were seen but weak PSMA-specific signals were observed by ELISA. The remaining 9 patients, which included the higher cohort and the extension cohort, had no PSMA specific cellular responses. PSMA-VRP was well-tolerated at both doses. While there did not appear to be clinical benefit nor robust immune signals at the two doses studied, neutralizing antibodies were produced by both cohorts suggesting that dosing was suboptimal.
    Vaccine 12/2012; · 3.77 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background This first-in-human phase I/IIA study was designed to evaluate the safety and pharmacokinetics (PKs) of AGS-PSCA a fully human monoclonal antibody directed to prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA) in progressive castration-resistant prostate cancer. Patients and methods Twenty-nine patients were administered infusions of AGS-PSCA (1-40 mg/kg) every 3 weeks for 12 weeks; 18 final patients received a 40-mg/kg loading dose followed by 20-mg/kg repeat doses. Primary end points were safety and PK. Immunogenicity, antitumor activity and circulating tumor cells were also evaluated. Results No drug-related serious adverse events were noted. Dose escalation stopped before reaching the maximum tolerated dose as target concentrations were achieved. Drug levels accumulated linearly with dose and the mean terminal half-life was 2-3 weeks across dose levels. The 40-mg/kg loading dose followed by repeated 20-mg/kg doses yielded serum drug concentrations above the projected minimum therapeutic threshold after two to three doses without excessive drug accumulation or toxicity. Significant antitumor effects were not seen. Conclusions A 40-mg/kg loading dose followed by 20-mg/kg infusions every 3 weeks is the recommended phase II dose of AGS-PSCA. PSCA is a promising drug target and studies in prostate and other relevant solid tumors are planned.
    Annals of Oncology 05/2012; 23(10):2714-9. · 7.38 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: AGS-1C4D4 is a human monoclonal antibody against prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA), a cell-surface protein expressed by most prostate cancers. AGS-1C4D4 is produced in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells and has an identical sequence to AGS-PSCA, an anti-PSCA antibody produced in mouse hybridoma cells that has completed Phase I testing. Preclinical studies demonstrated comparability of AGS-1C4D4 to AGS-PSCA with respect to pharmacokinetics (PK) and tumor inhibition. However, because of differences in antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity between AGS-PSCA and AGS-1C4D4, a limited Phase I trial using AGS-1C4D4 was performed evaluating safety and PK. Thirteen patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer were enrolled. AGS-1C4D4 was administered intravenously every 3 weeks for four planned doses at 6, 12, 24, or 48 mg/kg. Primary endpoints were safety and PK. Secondary endpoints were immunogenicity and clinical activity. Disease assessments were conducted every 12 weeks and included radiographic and PSA evaluations. Patients with stable disease could receive extended treatment beyond four infusions. Adverse events were primarily grade 1-2, without any grade 3-4 drug-related toxicities or infusion reactions. Anti-AGS-1C4D4 antibodies were not detected. Similar to AGS-PSCA, serum AGS-1C4D4 concentrations declined biphasically and elimination was characterized by slow clearance (CL) and a long terminal half-life (t (1/2)). Median CL for the four dose levels ranged from 0.10 to 0.14 ml/h kg, and t (1/2) ranged from 2.2 to 2.9 weeks. No PSA reductions ≥50% were observed. Six patients (46%) had radiographically stable disease, lasting a median of 24 weeks. AGS-1C4D4 was well-tolerated and demonstrated linear PK. Despite preclinical differences in antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, AGS-1C4D4 and AGS-PSCA have similar safety and PK profiles. The recommended Phase II dose is 48 mg/kg.
    Cancer Chemotherapy and Pharmacology 03/2012; 69(3):763-71. · 2.80 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The authors tested whether an educational video on the goals of care in advanced cancer (life-prolonging care, basic care, or comfort care) helped patients understand these goals and had an impact on their preferences for resuscitation. A survey of 80 patients with advanced cancer was conducted before and after they viewed an educational video. The outcomes of interest included changes in goals of care preference and knowledge and consistency of preferences with code status. Before viewing the video, 10 patients (13%) preferred life-prolonging care, 24 patients (30%) preferred basic care, 29 patients (36%) preferred comfort care, and 17 patients (21%) were unsure. Preferences did not change after the video, when 9 patients (11%) chose life-prolonging care, 28 patients (35%) chose basic care, 29 patients (36%) chose comfort care, and, 14 patients (18%) were unsure (P = .28). Compared with baseline, after the video presentation, more patients did not want cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) (71% vs 62%; P = .03) or ventilation (80% vs 67%; P = .008). Knowledge about goals of care and likelihood of resuscitation increased after the video (P < .001). Of the patients who did not want CPR or ventilation after the video augmentation, only 4 patients (5%) had a documented do-not-resuscitate order in their medical record (kappa statistic, -0.01; 95% confidence interval, -0.06 to 0.04). Acceptability of the video was high. Patients with advanced cancer did not change care preferences after viewing the video, but fewer wanted CPR or ventilation. Documented code status was inconsistent with patient preferences. Patients were more knowledgeable after the video, reported that the video was acceptable, and said they would recommend it to others. The current results indicated that this type of video may enable patients to visualize "goals of care," enriching patient understanding of worsening health states and better informing decision making.
    Cancer 01/2012; 118(17):4331-8. · 5.20 Impact Factor
  • Susan F Slovin
    Oncology (Williston Park, N.Y.) 12/2011; 25(14):1390, 1393. · 3.19 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To define maximum tolerated dose (MTD), clinical toxicities, and pharmacokinetics of 17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG) when administered in combination with docetaxel once every 21 days in patients with advanced solid tumor malignancies. Docetaxel was administered over 1 h at doses of 55, 70, and 75 mg/m(2). 17-AAG was administered over 1-2 h, following the completion of the docetaxel infusion, at escalating doses ranging from 80 to 650 mg/m(2) in 12 patient cohorts. Serum was collected for pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies during cycle 1. Docetaxel, 17-AAG, and 17-AG levels were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Biologic effects of 17-AAG were monitored in peripheral blood mononuclear cells by immunoblot. Forty-nine patients received docetaxel and 17-AAG. The most common all-cause grade 3 and 4 toxicities were leukopenia, lymphopenia, and neutropenia. An MTD was not defined; however, three dose-limiting toxicities were observed, including 2 incidences of neutropenic fever and 1 of junctional bradycardia. Dose escalation was halted at docetaxel 75 mg/m(2)-17-AAG 650 mg/m(2) due to delayed toxicities attributed to patient intolerance of the DMSO-based 17-AAG formulation. Of 46 evaluable patients, 1 patient with lung cancer experienced a partial response. Minor responses were observed in patients with lung, prostate, melanoma, and bladder cancers. A correlation between reduced docetaxel clearance and 17-AAG dose level was observed. The combination of docetaxel and 17-AAG was well tolerated in adult patients with solid tumors, although patient intolerance to the DMSO formulation precluded further dose escalation. The recommended phase II dose is docetaxel 70 mg/m(2) and 17-AAG 500 mg/m(2).
    Cancer Chemotherapy and Pharmacology 11/2011; 69(4):1089-97. · 2.80 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BMS-641988 is an androgen receptor antagonist with increased potency relative to bicalutamide in both in vitro and in vivo prostate cancer models. A first-in-man phase I study was conducted to define the safety and tolerability of oral BMS-641988 in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Doses were escalated from 5 to 150 mg based on discrete pharmacokinetic parameters in cohorts of three to six subjects. After establishing safety with 20 mg of BMS-641988 in the United States, a companion study was opened in Japan to assess differences in drug metabolism between populations. Sixty-one men with CRPC were treated with daily BMS-641988. The pharmacokinetics (PK) of BMS-641988 and its active metabolites were proportional to dose. One patient experienced an epileptic seizure at a dose of 60 mg administered twice. Despite achieving target drug exposures, antitumor activity was limited to one partial response. Seventeen of 23 evaluable patients (74%) exhibited stable disease on imaging (median 15 weeks; range 8-32), and 10 of 61 patients (16%) achieved a ≥ 30% decline in levels of prostate-specific antigen (PSA). Partial agonism was seen within the context of this study upon removal of the drug as evidenced by a decrease in PSA. Although the clinical outcomes of predominantly stable disease and partial agonism were similar to what was observed in the preclinical evaluation of the compound, the limited antitumor activity of BMS-641988 at therapeutic dose levels coupled with an episode of seizure activity led to study closure.
    Clinical Cancer Research 02/2011; 17(4):880-7. · 7.84 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Integrins mediate invasion and angiogenesis in prostate cancer bone metastases. We conducted a phase II study of cilengitide, a selective antagonist of α(v)β(3) and α(v)β(5) integrins, in non-metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer with rising PSA. Patients were observed for 4 weeks with PSA monitoring, and then treated with 2,000 mg IV of cilengitide twice weekly until toxicity/progression. PSA, circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and circulating endothelial cells (CECs) were monitored each cycle with imaging performed every three cycles. Primary end point was PSA decline by ≥ 50%. Secondary endpoints were safety, PSA slope, time to progression (TTP), overall survival (OS), CTCs, CECs and gene expression. 16 pts were enrolled; 13 were eligible with median age 65.5 years, baseline PSA 8.4 ng/mL and median Gleason sum 7. Median of three cycles was administered. Treatment was well tolerated with two grade three toxicities and no grade four toxicities. There were no PSA responses; 11 patients progressed by PSA after three cycles. Median TTP was 1.8 months and median OS has not been reached. Median pre- and on-treatment PSA slopes were 1.1 and 1.8 ng/mL/month. Baseline CTCs were detected in 1/9 patients. CTC increased (0 to 1; 2 pts), remained at 0 (2 pts) or decreased (23 to 0; 1 patient) at progression. Baseline median CEC was 26 (0-61) and at progression, 47 (15-148). Low cell counts precluded gene expression studies. Cilengitide was well tolerated but had no detectable clinical activity. CTCs are of questionable utility in non-metastatic prostate cancer.
    Investigational New Drugs 11/2010; 30(2):749-57. · 3.50 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Fatigue is a highly prevalent and clinically significant symptom of advanced prostate cancer. To date, however, there are no published controlled trials of interventions for fatigue in men with prostate cancer. This 6-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled design evaluated the efficacy of methylphenidate to treat fatigue in prostate cancer patients. Inclusion criteria included men with advanced prostate cancer and the presence of moderate to severe fatigue. Patients with major depression, hypothyroidism, uncontrolled hypertension, arrhythmia, or anemia were excluded. Fatigue levels, blood pressure, pulse, and other safety concerns were monitored regularly. Thirty-two subjects were randomized to methylphenidate (n=16) or placebo (n=16). Brief Fatigue Inventory total scores significantly decreased for both groups; however, the methylphenidate group, as compared with placebo, reported greater decrease on Brief Fatigue Inventory severity scores (P=.03) and a trend toward greater decrease on Brief Fatigue Inventory total scores (P=.07). A significantly greater number of subjects in the methylphenidate group versus the placebo group demonstrated clinically significant improvement in fatigue on total Brief Fatigue Inventory scores (7 of 10 vs 3 of 13) and Brief Fatigue Inventory severity scores (8 of 10 vs 3 of 13). Importantly, 6 subjects in the methylphenidate group discontinued because of increased blood pressure or tachycardia. There were no serious adverse events. Methylphenidate is effective in treating fatigue in men with prostate cancer; however, oncologists need to monitor for possible pulse and blood pressure elevations.
    Cancer 11/2010; 116(21):5102-10. · 5.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: B7-H3 and B7x are members of the B7 family of immune regulatory ligands that are thought to attenuate peripheral immune responses through co-inhibition. Previous studies have correlated their overexpression with poor prognosis and decreased tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes in various carcinomas including uterine endometrioid carcinomas, and mounting evidence supports an immuno-inhibitory role in ovarian cancer prognosis. We sought to examine the expression of B7-H3 and B7x in 103 ovarian borderline tumors and carcinomas and study associations with clinical outcome. Using immunohistochemical tissue microarray analysis on tumor specimens, we found that 93 and 100% of these ovarian tumors express B7-H3 and B7x, respectively, with expression found predominantly on cell membranes and in cytoplasm. In contrast, only scattered B7-H3- and B7x-positive cells were detected in non-neoplastic ovarian tissues. B7-H3 was also expressed in the endothelium of tumor-associated vasculature in 44% of patients, including 78% of patients with high-stage tumors (FIGO stages III and IV), nearly all of which were high-grade serous carcinomas, and 26% of patients with low-stage tumors (FIGO stages I and II; P<0.001), including borderline tumors. Analysis of cumulative survival time and recurrence incidence revealed that carcinomas with B7-H3-positive tumor vasculature were associated with a significantly shorter survival time (P=0.02) and a higher incidence of recurrence (P=0.03). The association between B7-H3-positive tumor vasculature and poor clinical outcome remained significant even when the analysis was limited to the high-stage subgroup. These results show that ovarian borderline tumors and carcinomas aberrantly express B7-H3 and B7x, and that B7-H3-positive tumor vasculature is associated with high-grade serous histological subtype, increased recurrence and reduced survival. B7-H3 expression in tumor vasculature may be a reflection of tumor aggressiveness and has diagnostic and immunotherapeutic implications in ovarian carcinomas.
    Modern Pathology 05/2010; 23(8):1104-12. · 5.25 Impact Factor
  • Susan F Slovin
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    ABSTRACT: A comparison was made using an established prognostic nomogram to determine the impact of survival on patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer using a pox-based vaccine. Survival in the treated cohort of 32 patients had improved compared with what was anticipated for the same group using an established nomogram. With a median follow-up of 44.6 months, the median overall survival for all 32 patients in the study was 26.6 months compared with a median nomogram-predicted survival of 17.4 months. The data suggested that there may be measures by which patients may be preselected and therefore may be more responsive candidates to a vaccine treatment approach. This study brings to light improved survival for patients, but the issue of how to reconcile a survival advantage in the absence of significant clinical anti-tumor response remains unsettled.
    Immunotherapy 03/2010; 2(2):155-8. · 2.39 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Studies of patients with paraneoplastic neurologic disorders (PND) have revealed that apoptotic tumor serves as a potential potent trigger for the initiation of naturally occurring tumor immunity. The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility, safety, and immunogenicity of an apoptotic tumor-autologous dendritic cell (DC) vaccine. We have modeled PND tumor immunity in a clinical trial in which apoptotic allogeneic prostate tumor cells were used to generate an apoptotic tumor-autologous dendritic cell vaccine. Twenty-four prostate cancer patients were immunized in a Phase I, randomized, single-blind, placebo-controlled study to assess the safety and immunogenicity of this vaccine. Vaccinations were safe and well tolerated. Importantly, we also found that the vaccine was immunogenic, inducing delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) responses and CD4+ and CD8+ T cell proliferation, with no effect on FoxP3+ regulatory T cells. A statistically significant increase in T cell proliferation responses to prostate tumor cells in vitro (p = 0.002), decrease in prostate specific antigen (PSA) slope (p = 0.016), and a two-fold increase in PSA doubling time (p = 0.003) were identified when we compared data before and after vaccination. An apoptotic cancer cell vaccine modeled on naturally occurring tumor immune responses in PND patients provides a safe and immunogenic tumor vaccine. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00289341.
    PLoS ONE 01/2010; 5(9). · 3.73 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

2k Citations
95 Downloads
495.52 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1997–2014
    • Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
      • • Department of Medicine
      • • Genitourinary Oncology Service
      New York City, New York, United States
  • 2012
    • Johns Hopkins University
      Baltimore, Maryland, United States
  • 2005
    • Merck
      Whitehouse Station, New Jersey, United States
  • 2004
    • University of Maryland, Baltimore
      Baltimore, Maryland, United States