Spyridon P Galanakos

General Hospital of Attica KAT, Kēfissia, Attica, Greece

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Publications (19)14.79 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Upper extremity trauma and resulting disability is a stressful event and can affect a patient's personality. Several studies have shown that this injury type has serious psychological and/or social consequences. We systematically reviewed the evidence on the consequences of disability after a complex trauma (combination of soft tissue, osseous, vascular, and nerve involvement) of the upper extremity. We tried to find out the potential crucial factors that could determine the final hand function. In addition, we considered the challenges that need to be addressed to eliminate the adverse or negative effects that arise from upper limb trauma. In the literature, there is a growing interest to study changes in patients' quality of life and return to work. Psychological morbidity is an important part of patients' perceived general health. These issues could play an important role in the final functional outcome of the therapy. An early identification and treatment of trauma-related distress in patients may prevent progression of psychological pathology and mitigate negative effects on general health status. It may be important to evaluate the amount of psychological distress when caring for patients with hand injuries.
    Journal of Reconstructive Microsurgery 12/2013; · 1.00 Impact Factor
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    Dataset: DFA-2-5653
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    ABSTRACT: Background: To investigate the behavior of Arc2f polyethylene (PE) component after a minimum of 15 years post implantation and its possible reasons for failure. Methods: Between January 1988 and March 1995, 557 cementless total hip arthroplasties were performed in 578 patients. A total of 435 patients (450 hips) were followed up for 18.6 years (range 15-22).Results: At 10 years follow-up no cup needed revision surgery. After 15 years of implantation, we observed massive PE wear in 140 cups (31%) with large osteolytic lesions. A revision procedure was performed in all cases. Exchange only of the PE liner was sufficient in 78 cases, whilst in 59 the cup was also revised. PE insert thickness and the type of prosthetic head were found to be related to PE wear.Conclusions: We postulate that the massive failure seen is attributed to the manufacturing of the PE insert. We advocate following all patients that have an implant lasting a decade after implantation for routine monitoring to identify those at risk for accelerated PE wear.
    Hip international: the journal of clinical and experimental research on hip pathology and therapy 08/2013; · 0.34 Impact Factor
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    Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research 01/2013; · 2.79 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Backround This retrospective study was undertaken to determine the incidence of kidney dysfunction (KD) and to identify potential risk factors contributing to development of KD in orthopaedic population following an elective or emergency surgery. METHODS: A total of 1025 patients were admitted in our institution over a period of one year with various indications. Eight hundred and ninety-three patients (87.1%) had a surgical procedure. There were 42 (52.5%) male and 38 (47.5%) female with a mean age of 72 years (range: 47 to 87 years). We evaluated the following potential risk factors: age, comorbidities, shock, hypotension, heart failure, medications (antibiotics, NSAIDs, opiates), rhabdomyolysis, imaging contrast agents and pre-existing KD. RESULTS: The overall incidence of KD was 8.9%. Sixty-eight patients developed acute renal injury (AKI) and 12 patients developed acute on chronic kidney disease (CKD). In sixty-six (82.5%) patients renal function was reversed to initial preoperative status. Perioperative dehydration (p = 0.002), history of diabetes mellitus (p = 0.003), pre-existing KD (p = 0.004), perioperative shock (p = 0.021) and administration of non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (p = 0.028) or nephrotoxic antibiotics (p = 0.037) were statistically significantly correlated with the development of postoperative KD and failure to gain the preoperative renal function. CONCLUSION: We conclude that every patient with risk factor for postoperative KD should be under closed evaluation and monitoring.
    BMC Nephrology 09/2012; 13(1):101. · 1.64 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Proximal femoral nail antirotation devices (PFNAs) are considered biomechanically superior to dynamic hip screws for treating unstable peritrochanteric fractures and reportedly have a lower complication rate. The PFNA II was introduced to eliminate lateral cortex impingement encountered with the PFNA. However, it is unclear whether the new design in fact avoids lateral cortex impingement without compromising stability of fixation and fracture healing. We therefore asked whether the PFNA II: (1) eliminates the lateral cortex impingement and fracture displacement experienced with PFNA; and (2) provides stable fracture fixation with a low major complication rate for unstable fractures in European patients. We retrospectively reviewed 108 patients with an unstable peritrochanteric fracture, 58 treated with PFNA and 50 with PFNA II. We compared nail positioning, major and minor complication rates, operative and fluoroscopy time, blood transfused, time to mobilization, hospital stay, fracture union, and Harris hip score. The minimum followup was 12 months (mean, 13 months; range, 12-18 months). In the PFNA II group we encountered no impingement on the lateral cortex and no patients with lateral fragment or loss of reduction at insertion, whereas with the PFNA group, we had 10 and five cases, respectively. Fracture union occurred in all patients treated with PFNA II without mechanical failures. PFNA II cases were associated with a slightly shorter surgical time than PFNA cases (23 minutes versus 27 minutes, respectively). PFNA II avoided lateral cortex impingement experienced with PFNA, providing fast and stable fixation of the unstable peritrochanteric fractures. Level III, retrospective comparative study. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.
    Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research 07/2012; 470(11):3067-76. · 2.79 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: So far, predictive models with individualized estimates of prognosis for patients with peripheral nerve injuries are lacking. Our group has previously shown the prognostic value of a standardized scoring system by examining the functional outcome after acute, sharp complete laceration and repair of median and/or ulnar nerves at various levels in the forearm. In the present study, we further explore the potential mathematical model in order to devise an effective prognostic scoring system. We retrospectively collected medical record data of 73 cases with a peripheral nerve injury in the upper extremity in order to estimate which patients would return to work, and what time was necessary to return to the pre-injury work. Postoperative assessment followed the protocol described by Rosén and Lundborg. We found that return to pre-injury work can be predicted with high sensitivity (100%) and specificity (95%) using the total numerical score of the Rosén and Lundborg protocol at the third follow-up interval (TS3) as well as the difference between the TS3 and the total score at second follow-up interval (TS2). In addition, the factors age and type of injured nerve (median, ulnar, or combined) can determine the time of return to work based on a mathematical model. This prognostic protocol can be a useful tool to provide information about the functional and social prospects of the patients with these types of injuries. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Microsurgery 2012.
    Microsurgery 06/2012; · 1.62 Impact Factor
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    Aristides B Zoubos, Spyridon P Galanakos, Panayotis N Soucacos
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    ABSTRACT: Bacteria have been found to grow predominantly in biofilms. The initial stage includes the attachment of bacteria to the substratum. Bacterial growth and division then leads to the colonization of the surrounding area and the formation of the biofilm. The environment in a biofilm is not homogeneous; the bacteria in a multispecies biofilm are not randomly distributed, but rather are organized to best meet their needs. Although there is an initial understanding on the mechanisms of biofilm-associated antimicrobial resistance, this topic is still under investigation. A variety of approaches are being explored to overcome biofilm-associated antimicrobial resistance. A greater understanding of biofilm processes should lead to novel, effective control strategies for biofilm control and a resulting improvement in patient management.
    Medical science monitor: international medical journal of experimental and clinical research 06/2012; 18(6):RA89-96. · 1.36 Impact Factor
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    02/2012; , ISBN: 978-953-51-0137-6
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    ABSTRACT: Peripheral nerve injuries are still underestimated. The complexity of assessment of outcome after nerve injury and repair has been described by many authors. Furthermore, the outcome is influenced by several factors that depend on mechanisms in the peripheral as well as the central nervous system. Appropriate formulation of a global accepted postoperative clinical protocol for peripheral nerve repair in the upper extremity remains a subject of debate. The purpose of this review is to detail the current concepts of methods of evaluation after peripheral nerves repair. Finally, we discuss the most crucial factors that determine the final hand function and we consider the challenges that need to be addressed to create a realistic clinical protocol that reflects a prognostic importance.
    Microsurgery 01/2012; 32(4):326-33. · 1.62 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The combination of dorsal dislocation of the navicular from the talus and a comminuted fracture of the calcaneus (transcalcaneal talonavicular dislocation) is an unusual and severe injury. It occurs due to a forced plantarflexion of the talar head through the anterior portion of the calcaneum and is usually associated with a potential for skin and neurovascular compromise. Few cases have been reported in the literature. This article reports an unusual case of an open transcalcaneal talonavicular dislocation associated with the presence of a calcaneal comminuted calcaneal fracture.
    Clinics in Podiatric Medicine and Surgery 08/2011; 28(4):763-7.
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    ABSTRACT: A comparison of outcomes based on a scoring system for assessments, described by Rosén and Lundborg, after sharp complete laceration of median and/or ulnar nerves at various levels in the forearm was carried out. There were 66 males (90.4%) and 7 females (9.6%), with a mean age of 31 years (range: 14-62 years). The patients were categorized into three groups according to the type of nerve injury. The median nerve was injured in 25 cases (group M, 34.3%), the ulnar in 27 (group U, 36.9%), and both the nerves in 21 (group MU, 28.8%). The demographic data of the patients and the mechanism of injury were recorded. We also examined the employment status at the time of the injury and we estimated the percentage of patients who returned to their work after trauma. In all cases, a primary epineural repair was performed. Concomitant injuries were repaired in the same setting. The mean period of time between injury and surgery was 5.3 hours (range: 2-120 hours). A rehabilitation protocol and a reeducation program were followed in all cases. The mean follow-up was 3 years (range: 2-6 years), with more distal injuries having a shorter follow-up period. The total score was 2.71 in group M (range: 0.79-2.99) and 2.63 in group U (range: 0.63-3), with no significant differences observed. There was a significant difference between these two groups and group MU (total score 2.03, range: 0.49-2.76, P = 0.02). Up to the last follow-up, 61 patients (83.5%) had returned to their previous work. The Rosén-Lundborg model can be a useful and simple tool for the evaluation of the functional outcome after nerve injury and repair temporally reflecting the processes of regeneration and reinnervation.
    Microsurgery 05/2011; 31(4):253-62. · 1.62 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We studied 140 patients with femoral neck fractures treated from January 1999 to December 2006. There were 68 men and 72 women with a mean age of 72 years (range 60-80 years). Seventy patients were treated with closed reduction and internal fixation (group A), and 70 patients with hip arthroplasty (group B). The duration of surgery, length of hospitalization, complications, postoperative Harris hip score, and need for reoperation were recorded. Group B had significantly higher blood loss, increased surgical time and length of hospitalization compared to group A patients. The Harris hip score was significantly higher in group B at the 3, 6, and 12-month follow-up evaluations; however, the differences were no longer significant at the 24-month evaluation. The overall complications rate was 18.6% (13 patients) in group A compared to 25.7% (18 patients) in group B; this was not statistically significant (P = 0.309). A statistically significant difference was found regarding reoperation rate in group A (11.4%, eight patients) compared to group B (1.4%, one patient) (P = 0.016). Arthroplasty compared to internal fixation for displaced femoral neck fractures is associated with a significantly higher functional score and lower risk of reoperation at the cost of greater infection rates, blood loss, and operative time.
    Strategies in Trauma and Limb Reconstruction 04/2011; 6(1):7-12.
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    ABSTRACT: The treatment of 31 consecutive adult patients, ages 25-67 years with chronic draining osteomyelitis (12 cases) or infected pseudarthrosis (19 cases) by the Papineau technique was retrospectively reviewed. The initial injury was an open fracture in 24 patients and a closed fracture in 7 patients. In all cases an Ilizarov circular external fixation device was used for the stabilization of the fracture or for bone lengthening. Mean follow-up for the group was 20 months (range, 10 months to 5 years) and there was successful limb salvage in all cases with eradication of infection and bone consolidation was achieved. The Ilizarov circular external fixation was removed at a mean of 18 weeks (range, 14-24 weeks). The mean time to bone union was 5 months (range, 4-10 months). All patients returned to their pre-treatment activity levels or better.
    Diabetic foot & ankle. 01/2011; 2.
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    ABSTRACT: The authors present their experience with the use of sural fasciocutaneous flaps for the treatment of various soft tissue defects in the lower limb. This paper is a review of these flaps carried out between 2003 and 2008. The series consists of 16 patients, 11 men and 5 women with an average age of 41 years (17-81) and with a follow-up period between 2 and 7 years. The etiology was major velocity accident in six cases, diabetes mellitus with osteomyelitis after ORIF for fractures (2), work accident in five, and another two cases with complications of lower limb injuries. The defect areas were located on calcaneus, malleolar area, tarsal area and lower tibia. Associated risk factors in the patients for the flap performance were diabetes (five patients) and cigarette smoking (ten patients).The technique is based on the use of a reverse-flow island sural flap combined with other flaps in three cases (cross-leg, peroneal, gastrocnemius). The anatomical structures which constituted the pedicle were the superficial and deep fascia, the sural nerve, the lesser saphenous vein and skin.The flap was viable in all 15 patients. On 8 cases was achieved direct closure, on three cases occurred a superficial necrosis and was skin grafted, on one case was observed partial necrosis which was treated with a second flap (posterior tibial perforator flap) and another one occurred delayed skin healing.The sural fasciocutaneous flap is useful for the treatment of severe and complex injuries and their complications in diabetic and non diabetic lower limbs. Its technical advantages are easy dissection, preservation of more important vascular structures in the limb and complete coverage of the soft tissue defects in just one operation without the need of microsurgical anastomosis. Thus this flap offers excellent donor sites for repairing soft tissue defects in foot and ankle.
    Diabetic Foot & Ankle. 01/2011;
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    ABSTRACT: The authors present their experience with the use of sural fasciocutaneous flaps for the treatment of various soft tissue defects in the lower limb. This paper is a review of these flaps carried out between 2003 and 2008. The series consists of 16 patients, 11 men and 5 women with an average age of 41 years (17-81) and with a follow-up period between 2 and 7 years. The etiology was major velocity accident in six cases, diabetes mellitus with osteomyelitis after ORIF for fractures (2), work accident in five, and another two cases with complications of lower limb injuries. The defect areas were located on calcaneus, malleolar area, tarsal area and lower tibia. Associated risk factors in the patients for the flap performance were diabetes (five patients) and cigarette smoking (ten patients).The technique is based on the use of a reverse-flow island sural flap combined with other flaps in three cases (cross-leg, peroneal, gastrocnemius). The anatomical structures which constituted the pedicle were the superficial and deep fascia, the sural nerve, the lesser saphenous vein and skin.The flap was viable in all 15 patients. On 8 cases was achieved direct closure, on three cases occurred a superficial necrosis and was skin grafted, on one case was observed partial necrosis which was treated with a second flap (posterior tibial perforator flap) and another one occurred delayed skin healing.The sural fasciocutaneous flap is useful for the treatment of severe and complex injuries and their complications in diabetic and non diabetic lower limbs. Its technical advantages are easy dissection, preservation of more important vascular structures in the limb and complete coverage of the soft tissue defects in just one operation without the need of microsurgical anastomosis. Thus this flap offers excellent donor sites for repairing soft tissue defects in foot and ankle.
    Diabetic foot & ankle. 01/2011; 2.
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    ABSTRACT: Despite modern surgical techniques and advanced antimicrobial therapy, open lower-extremity fracture management and osteomyelitis remain a challenge for reconstructive surgeons. Posttraumatic composite bone and soft tissue defects are usually the result of high-energy trauma and are often associated with concomitant injuries, therefore making complex reconstruction more difficult. This article presents a case report of an open distal tibial fracture managed by a simultaneous distraction osteogenesis and Papineau technique with a long term follow-up and literature review.
    Clinics in Podiatric Medicine and Surgery 07/2010; 27(3):463-7.
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    ABSTRACT: Adamantinoma of the long bones is a rare primary malignant bone tumor accounting for less than 1% of all primary malignant bone tumors. Most typical imaging findings include heterogeneous osteolytic cortical lesions showing multiple sharply circumscribed lucent zones of various sizes with sclerotic bone surroundings, interspersing between, and extending above and below the lucent zones by the thinning and bulging cortex. Advanced or recurrent lesions may be associated with destruction of the cortex and soft tissue extension. In this article, the authors present a case report of a patient with a distal tibia adamantinoma mimicking a benign cystic lesion.
    Clinics in Podiatric Medicine and Surgery 01/2010; 27(1):157-65.
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    ABSTRACT: Biofilms are complex communities of surface-attached micro-organisms made up of single or multiple species. They grow in three stages, attachment of bacteria to the substratum followed by bacterial growth and division and then colonization of the surrounding area and the formation of the biofilm. While the basic mechanisms of biofilm-associated antimicrobial resistance are understood, research continues into biofilm- associated antimicrobial resistance.
    Orthopaedics and Trauma. 06/2009; 23(3):175–179.

Publication Stats

24 Citations
397 Downloads
1k Views
14.79 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2011–2013
    • General Hospital of Attica KAT
      Kēfissia, Attica, Greece
    • General Hospital of Levadia
      Livadeiá, Central Greece, Greece
  • 2012
    • Attikon University Hospital
      Athínai, Attica, Greece