Shahnaz Rahman

University of Development Alternative, Dhaka, Dhaka Division, Bangladesh

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Publications (22)8.13 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Alternanthera sessilis is used by folk medicinal practitioners of Bangladesh for alleviation of severe pain. The objective of this study was to scientifically analyze the analgesic (non-narcotic) property of aerial parts of the plant along with antihyperglycemic activity.
    BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine 05/2014; 14(1):169. · 2.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Xanthium indicum stem is used in folk medicine of Bangladesh to control sugar in diabetic patients and to alleviate pain. The objective of the study was to evaluate antihyperglycemic and antinociceptive activity of methanolic extract of Xanthium indicum stems (XISE) in mice. Antihyperglycemic activity was measured by oral glucose tolerance tests in glucose-loaded Swiss albino mice. Antinociceptive activity was determined by observed decreases in abdominal constrictions in acetic acid-induced gastric pain model in mice. The methanol extract of stems showed dose-dependent and statistically significant antihyperglycemic activity at doses of 50, 100, 200 and 400 mg per kg body weight (p values, respectively, < than 0.01, 0.01, 0.005, and 0.01). Highest reduction in blood glucose level (31.2%) was observed with the highest dose (400 mg) of the extract. A standard antihyperglycemic drug, glibenclamide, reduced blood glucose levels by 46.2%, when administered at a dose of 10 mg per kg body weight. In antinociceptive activity tests, the extract when administered at the afore-mentioned four doses, reduced the number of abdominal constrictions in mice, respectively, by 41.7, 50.0, 54.2, and 61.0%. In comparison, a standard antinociceptive drug, aspirin, when administered at a dose of 200 mg per kg body weight, reduced the number of abdominal constrictions by 37.5%. The experimental results obtained in the present study validate the use of X. indicum stems in folk medicines of Bangladesh to lower blood sugar in diabetic patients and to alleviate pain.
    BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine 10/2013; 13(1):296. · 2.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Amaranthus tricolor whole plants are used by folk medicinal practitioners of Bangladesh for treatment of pain, anaemia, dysentery, skin diseases, diabetes, and as a blood purifier. Thus far, no scientific studies have evaluated the antihyperglycaemic and antinociceptive effects of the plant. The present study was carried out to evaluate the possible glucose tolerance efficacy of methanolic extracts of A. tricolour whole plants using glucose-induced hyperglycaemic mice, and antinociceptive effects with acetic acid-induced gastric pain models in mice. In antihyperglycaemic activity tests, the extract at different doses was administered one hour prior to glucose administration and blood glucose level was measured after two hours of glucose administration (p.o.) using glucose oxidase method. The statistical data indicated the significant oral hypoglycaemic activity on glucose-loaded mice at all doses of the extracts tested. Maximum antihyperglycaemic activity was shown at 400 mg extract per kg body weight, which was comparable to that of a standard drug, glibenclamide (10 mg/kg body weight). In antinociceptive activity tests, the extract also demonstrated a dose-dependent significant reduction in the number of writhings induced in mice through intraperitoneal administration of acetic acid. Maximum antinociceptive activity was observed at a dose of 400 mg extract per kg body weight, which compared favourably with that of a standard antinociceptive drug, aspirin, when administered at a dose of 200 mg per kg body weight. The results validate the folk medicinal use of the plant for reduction of blood sugar in diabetic patients as well as the folk medicinal use for alleviation of pain. The results suggest that this plant may possess further potential for scientific studies leading to possible discovery of efficacious antihyperglycaemic and antinociceptive components.
    African Journal of Traditional, Complementary and Alternative Medicines 01/2013; 10(5):408-11. · 0.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Diabetes is a debilitating disease affecting millions of people worldwide for which allopathic medicine has no known complete cure. Since the disease is projected to rise, significant scientific interest has focused on the plant kingdom towards discovery of newer anti-hyperglycemic drugs. The objective of the present research was to evaluate in oral glucose tolerance tests, the anti-hyperglycemic potential of methanol extract of Curcuma zedoaria rhizomes and fruits of Sonneratia caseolaris, both of which are used as anti-diabetics in the folk medicinal system of Bangladesh. Methanolic extract of rhizomes, when orally administered to glucose-loaded mice significantly and dose-dependently reduced concentrations of serum glucose. At extract doses of 50, 100, 200 and 400 mg per kg body weight serum glucose concentrations were reduced by, respectively, 36.9, 39.4, 41.1 and 55.1%. In comparison, a standard anti-hyperglycemic drug, glibenclamide reduced serum glucose concentration by 63.9% at a dose of 10 mg per kg body weight. Methanol extract of fruits also significantly and dose-dependently reduced serum glucose concentrations following administration, but the percent reductions were less than that obtained with rhizomes. At same doses of extract, serum glucose concentrations were reduced by 19.3, 27.6, 28.6 and 41.4%, respectively. The demonstrated anti-hyperglycemic activities by rhizomes of C. zedoaria and fruits of S. caseolaris validate their folk medicinal uses and warrants further studies towards elucidation of responsible phytochemical components, which can be potentially more efficacious drugs for treatment of diabetes.
    International Journal of PharmTech Research. 03/2012; 4(1-CODEN (USA): IJPRIF ISSN : 0974-4304):125-129.
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    ABSTRACT: To study the antihyperglycemic and antinociceptive activities of methanolic extract of the whole plant of Euphorbia thymifolia L., a plant used in folk medicine of Bangladesh for treatment of diabetes and pain. Antihyperglycemic activity studies were conducted in glucose-loaded mice by oral glucose tolerance tests. Mice were given various doses of the extract, followed by glucose (2 g/kg body weight), 1 h after administration of the extract. Serum glucose levels were measured 2 h after glucose administration. Antinociceptive activity studies were conducted in intraperitoneally acetic acid-injected mice through measurement of reductions in abdominal writhing times caused by acetic acid-induced gastric pain. Following a period of 1 h after oral administration of various doses of the extract, all mice received intraperitoneal injection of 1% acetic acid at a dose of 10 mL/kg body weight. To ensure bioavailability of acetic acid, a period of 5 min was given to each animal following which period the number of writhings was counted for 10 min. The extract caused a significant dose-dependent reduction in serum glucose levels in mice, when administered at doses of 50, 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg body weight as compared to the control animals (P<0.05). The highest reduction of serum glucose (60.5%) was observed at a dose of 400 mg/kg. In comparison, a standard antihyperglycemic drug glibenclamide, when administered at a dose of 10 mg/kg body weight, lowered serum glucose levels by 48.6%. The extract also demonstrated a significant dose-dependent antinociceptive activity compared to control animals (P<0.05). At a dose of 400 mg/kg body weight, the number of abdominal writhings was inhibited by 40.9% as compared to 49.0% inhibition obtained with a standard antinociceptive drug aspirin, administered at a dose of 200 mg/kg body weight. The significant antihyperglycemic and antinociceptive activities demonstrated by the extract validate the use of E. thymifolia in folk medicine of Bangladesh for treatment of diabetes and pain, and merit further scientific studies leading to discovery of efficacious drugs.
    Journal of Chinese Integrative Medicine 02/2012; 10(2):228-32.
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    ABSTRACT: Averrhoa carambola L. (Oxalidaceae), Ficus hispida L.f. (Moraceae), and Syzygium samarangense (Blume) Merr. & L.M. Perry (Myrtaceae) are three common plants in Bangladesh, the fruits of which are edible. The leaves and fruits of A. carambola and F. hispida are used by folk medicinal practitioners for treatment of diabetes, while the leaves of S. samarangense are used for treatment of cold, itches, and waist pain. Since scientific studies are absent on the antihyperglycemic effects of the leaves of the three plants, it was the objective of the present study to evaluate the antihyperglycemic potential of methanolic extract of leaves of the plants in oral glucose tolerance tests carried out with glucose-loaded mice. The extracts at different doses were administered one hour prior to glucose administration and blood glucose level was measured after two hours of glucose administration (p.o.) using glucose oxidase method. Significant oral hypoglycemic activity was found with the extracts of leaves of all three plants tested. The fall in serum glucose levels were dose-dependent for every individual plant, being highest at the highest dose tested of 400 mg extract per kg body weight. At this dose, the extracts of A. carambola, F. hispida, and S. samarangense caused, respectively, 34.1, 22.7, and 59.3% reductions in serum glucose levels when compared to control animals. The standard antihyperglycemic drug, glibenclamide, caused a 57.3% reduction in serum glucose levels versus control. Among the three plants evaluated, the methanolic extract of leaves of S. samarangense proved to be the most potent in demonstrating antihyperglycemic effects. The result validates the folk medicinal uses of A. carambola and F. hispida in the treatment of diabetes, and indicates that the leaves of S. samarangense can also possibly be used for amelioration of diabetes-induced hyperglycemia.
    African Journal of Traditional, Complementary and Alternative Medicines 01/2012; 9(2):287-91. · 0.52 Impact Factor
  • African Journal of Traditional, Complementary and Alternative Medicines 01/2012; · 0.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Nypa fruticans Wurmb. (Arecaceae) is a mangrove palm well-known for its traditional uses by the local practitioners against different ailments in southern regions of Bangladesh. However, the plant is yet to be scientifically studied. The present study was done to evaluate the anti-hyperglycemic and antinociceptive potential of methanolic extract of leaf and stem of Nypa fruticans Wurmb. (MENF). The anti-hyperglycemic activity was tested on glucose loaded hyperglycemic mice whereas antinociceptive activity was evaluated using a model of acetic acid-induced writhing in mice. The crude MENF was found to show significant oral anti-hyperglycemic activity on glucose loaded mice at every dose. Maximum anti-hyperglycemic activity was observed at a dose of 500 mg MENF/kg body weight, which was more than what was obtained with a standard drug glibenclamide at a dose of 10 mg glibenclamide/kg body weight). Significant antinociceptive activity was also demonstrated by MENF in acetic acid-induced writhing mice model. The extract caused a maximum of 39.88% (p<0.001) inhibition of writhing at the dose of 600 mg/kg body weight, which was better than the result obtained with a standard drug (200 mg aspirin/kg body weight, 49.34% inhibition). These findings indicate that MENF has significant anti-hyperglycemic and antinociceptive activity and thus have great potential as a source of natural products.
    Pakistan journal of pharmaceutical sciences 10/2011; 24(4):485-8. · 0.95 Impact Factor
  • Advances in Natural and Applied Sciences 01/2011; 5(2).
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    ABSTRACT: The objective of the present study was to investigate the antinociceptive and anti-hyperglycemic activity of methanolic leaf extract of Cyperus scariosus. Antinociceptive activity was determined using a model of acetic acid-induced gastric pain in mice and anti-hyperglycemic activity through glucose tolerance test using glucose loaded mice. In writhing assays induced by acetic acid, the methanolic leaf extract showed dose dependent significant pain inhibition compared to control. The maximum writhing inhibition (46.62%) was found at a dose of 200 mg/kg body weight which was less than that of the positive control, aspirin (56.74%), when used at the same dose. Anti-hyperglycemic activity of the extract was also found to be significant in mice loaded with glucose at doses of 200 and 400 mg/kg body weight. Maximum tolerance (42.86%) was showed at 400 mg extract/kg body weight, which compared favorably with that of glibenclamide at 10 mg/kg body weight (57.62%). In summary, the methanol extract of C. scariosus leaves has had beneficial effects as a pain reliever and also in reducing the elevated blood glucose level of hyperglycemic mice.
    Pakistan journal of pharmaceutical sciences 01/2011; 24(1):53-6. · 0.95 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The antinociceptive effect of crude methanol extracts of stems and leaves of Areca catechu L. (Arecaceae) was evaluated in acetic acid-induced gastric pain writhing model in Swiss albino mice. The methanol extract of Areca catechu stems dose-dependently reduced the number of writhings (constrictions) in mice, when tested at doses of 50, 100, 200, and 400 mg extract administered per kg body weight. Significant reductions in the number of writhings were noted with all administered doses. The percent inhibitions of acetic acid-induced writhings with the four different doses were, respectively, 30.8, 36.6, 40.9 and 59.6. The standard antinociceptive drug, aspirin, when administered at doses of 200 and 400 mg per kg body weight reduced writhings by 42.3 and 55.8%, respectively. A significant dose-dependent inhibition of writhings was also observed with crude methanol extract of Areca catechu leaves, where the extract at doses of 50, 100, 200 and 400 mg per kg body weight significantly inhibited writhings by 55.8, 57.7, 86.5 and 88.5%, respectively. Dose for dose, the leaf extract demonstrated higher antinociceptive activity than the stem extract. At even the lowest dose of 50 mg extract per kg body weight, the antinociceptive activity of leaf extract was comparable to that of 400 mg aspirin per kg body weight. The results suggest that both stem and leaf extract possess good antinociceptive activity, which merits further scientific studies as to isolation of responsible phytochemical component(s).
    Advances in Natural and Applied Sciences. 01/2011; 5:223-226.
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    ABSTRACT: Neolamarckia cadamba (Rubiaceae) leaf is used in folk medicine of Bangladesh for the treatment of diabetes, but so far no scientific study has been done which may support its use in traditional medicine. The present study was carried out to evaluate the possible glucose tolerance efficacy of methanolic extract of Neolamarckia cadamba leaf using glucose-induced hyperglycemic mice. The extract at different doses was administered one hour prior to glucose administration and blood glucose level was measured after two hours of glucose administration (p.o.) using glucose oxidase method. The statistical data indicated significant oral hypoglycemic activity on glucose-loaded mice at the two highest doses of 200 and 400 mg extract per kg body weight. Maximum anti-hyperglycemic activity was shown at 400 mg per kg body weight, which was comparable to that of, glibenclamide (10 mg/kg). The methanolic extract of leaf of Neolamarckia cadamba had beneficial effects in reducing the elevated blood glucose level of hyperglycemic mice.
    African Journal of Traditional, Complementary and Alternative Medicines 01/2011; 8(1):79-81. · 0.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In vitro propagation from cotyledonary nodes of germinated seedlings of Abelmoschus moschatus ABSTRACT Regeneration of plantlets from cotyledonary nodes of Abelmoschus moschatus (Malvaceae) has been accomplished through the present research. This species is widely consumed for its edible parts-leaves, seed pods and seeds; and has extensive uses in traditional medicine. The plant contains essential oils and volatile compounds like myricetin, which possesses hypoglycemic activity. Our objective was to observe the effect of plant growth regulators in vitro to generate a method of propagation. We collected the mature seeds from the field and germination was carried out into petridishes following surface sterilization with 0.1% HgCl 2 for 6 minutes. The cotyledons of germinated seedlings were excised and inoculated onto Murashige and Skoog (MS) media containing different plant growth hormones including 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP), Kinetin (Kn), indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), α-naphthalene acetic acid (NAA), indole-3-butyric acid (IBA). After four weeks of inoculation, shoot regeneration occurred and they attained up to 3.95 cm in MS + BAP [1.0 mg/l]. Combination of BAP and Kn accelerated shoot proliferation with an average length of 5.08 cm. Multiplication of shoots (2.0 shoots/explant) was observed in MS + BAP [0.5 mg/l] + IAA [1.0 mg/l] with expanded and deep green leaves. Callogenic response was obtained when BAP and NAA was supplemented in MS medium. Roots successfully emerged when in vitro raised micro-shoots were separated from the clumps and culture in MS + IBA [1.0 mg/l]. The plantlets were acclimatized in to soil after proper hardening and 65% of them successfully survived after eight weeks of transplantation. This developed method of clonal propagation could play an important role in large-scale plant production of this herb and for in vitro conservation.
    American-Eurasian Journal of Sustainable Agriculture 01/2011; 5(3):364-370.
  • Advances in Natural and Applied Sciences 01/2010;
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    ABSTRACT: Phyllanthus reticulatus Poir. (Euphorbiaceae) is used in folk medicinal practices of Bangladesh as an antinociceptive (reducing sensitivity to painful stimuli) and for treatment of kidney, gall bladder, liver, and gastrointestinal disorders of diabetic patients. The objective of the present study was to investigate the antinociceptive and anti-hyperglycemic activity of methanolic leaf extract of Phyllanthus reticulatus in Swiss albino mice. A model of acetic acid-induced gastric pain in mice was utilized to determine the antinociceptive effects, and anti-hyperglycemic activity was determined through glucose tolerance test using glucose-loaded mice. In writhing assays induced by acetic acid, the methanolic leaf extract showed significant inhibition compared to control. The maximum writhing inhibition (39.1%) was found at a dose of 200 mg extract/kg body weight which, however, was lesser than that of the antinociceptive drug, aspirin (50.4%), when used at a dose of 200 mg/kg body weight. Dose-dependent and significant anti-hyperglycemic activity of the extract was found in mice loaded with glucose at extract doses of 100, 200 and 400 mg extract/kg body weight. Maximum tolerance (35.0%) was showed at 400 mg extract/kg body weight, compared to that of the standard drug, glibenclamide at 10 mg/kg body weight (57.8%). In summary, the methanol extract of Phyllanthus reticulatus leaves had beneficial effects as a pain reliever and also in reducing the elevated blood glucose level of hyperglycemic mice, which validates the use of the plant in Bangladesh folk medicinal practices as a treatment for pain and diabetes-related disorders.
    Advances in Natural and Applied Sciences 01/2010; 4(78):229-232.
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    Advances in Natural and Applied Sciences 01/2010;
  • Advances in Natural and Applied Sciences 01/2010; 4(3):221-225, 2010..
  • Advances in Natural and Applied Sciences 01/2010;
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    ABSTRACT: Cajanus cajan (L.) Millsp. (Fabaceae, local name: orhor, English name: pigeon pea) is widely cultivated in Bangladesh for its edible seeds. The leaves are also consumed during times of food scarcity. In the folk medicinal system of Bangladesh, the leaves and stems of the plant are predominantly used for treatment of jaundice and diabetes. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the antihyperglycemic and cytotoxic potential of methanol extract of leaves and roots of the plant. Antihyperglycemic activity was studied by oral glucose tolerance tests in glucose-loaded Swiss albino mice. The methanol extract of leaves showed dose-dependent and significant reductions of serum glucose levels in mice. At doses of 200 and 400 mg leaf extract/kg body weight, the reductions in glucose levels were comparable to that of the standard antihyperglycemic drug, glibenclamide, administered at a dose of 10 mg/kg body weight. In contrast, the methanol extract of roots showed a dose-dependent increase in serum glucose levels, which was statistically significant at the highest dose of 400 mg extract/kg body weight. The cytotoxic potential of methanol extracts of leaves and roots were measured with the brine shrimp lethality bioassay. Both leaf and root extracts showed a high degree of toxicity to brine shrimp with LC 50 values, respectively, of 0.0264 and 1.849 mg/ml. The results obtained with antihyperglycemic tests with leaves of the plant validate its folk medicinal use for diabetes. The brine shrimp lethality assay results suggest that the plant can be a promising source of anti-cancer compounds.
    Advances in Natural and Applied Sciences 01/2010; 4:311-316.
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    ABSTRACT: Leucas aspera (Willd.) Link (Lamiaceae) and Lannea coromandelica (Houtt.) Merr. are two fairly common medicinal plants used by the folk medicinal practitioners of Bangladesh. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the antihyperglycemic effects of methanol extract of leaves and stems of Leucas aspera and bark of Lannea coromandelica in oral glucose tolerance tests conducted with glucose-challenged Swiss albino mice. The methanol extracts of leaves and stems of Leucas aspera, when studied separately, both demonstrated significant and dose-dependent reductions in serum glucose levels in glucose-loaded mice. At the highest dose tested of 400 mg extract per kg body weight, the methanol extract of leaves and stems, respectively, caused 34.01% and 28.39% reductions in serum glucose levels compared to control mice. In comparison, the standard antihyperglycemic drug, glibenclamide, when administered at a dose of 10 mg per kg body weight caused a 42.10% reduction in serum glucose levels. Dose for dose, the leaf extract of Leucas aspera was more potent in reduction of serum glucose levels than stem extract. The bark extract of Lannea coromandelica, when administered to glucose-loaded mice also demonstrated dose-dependent and significant reductions in serum glucose levels. At the highest dose tested of 400 mg extract per kg body weight, the extract caused a 29.80% fall in serum glucose levels. In conclusion, the leaves and stems of Leucas aspera and the bark of Lannea coromandelica can form the subject of further scientific studies in the quest for better antidiabetic drugs.
    Advances in Natural and Applied Sciences 01/2010; 4(78):385-388.