Shahnaz Rahman

University of Development Alternative, Dhaka, Dhaka Division, Bangladesh

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Publications (31)28.66 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: In oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), methanol extract of Ananas comosus leaves, when administered orally to glucose-loaded Swiss albino mice at doses of 50, 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg body weight led to dose-dependent reductions in blood glucose levels. At these doses, the percent reductions in blood glucose levels were, respectively, 6.5, 20.2,30.5, and 46.9% compared to control animals. A standard anthyperglycemic drug, glibenclamide, when administered at a dose of 10 mg/kg body weight reduced blood glucose levels by 47.3%. The extract at the afore-mentioned four doses, also dose-dependently reduced acetic acid-induced abdominal constrictions in mice by 29.6, 37.0, 44.4, and 48.1%, respectively. A standard analgesic drug, aspirin, when administered at doses of 200 and 400 mg/kg reduced the number of abdominal constrictions, respectively, by 44.4 and 55.6%. Preliminary phytochemical screening showed presence of alkaloids, flavonoids, saponins and tannins in the extract, which components can be responsible for the observed blood glucose lowering and analgesic effects.
    World Journal of Pharmaceutical Research 10/2014; 3(8):24-34. · 5.05 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Trevesia palmata, also known as the Snowflake Aralia is found in Lawachara Forest Reserve of Bangladesh. It was of interest to phytochemically screen and determine the antihyperglycemic and analgesic properties of the leaves. Methods: Antihyperglycemic activity was determined through oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT). Analgesic activity was determined by observed decreases in abdominal constrictions (writhings) in intraperitoneally administered acetic acid-induced pain model in mice. Phytochemical screening was done through standard methods. Results: Administration of methanol extract of leaves led to dose-dependent reductions in blood glucose levels in glucose-loaded mice. At doses of 100, 200 and 400 mg per kg body weight, the extract dose-dependently reduced blood glucose levels by 17.9, 28.1, and 47.4%, respectively compared to control animals. By comparison, a standard antihyperglycemic drug, glibenclamide, when dministered at a dose of 10 mg per kg body weight, reduced blood glucose level by 47.4%. In analgesic activity tests, the extract at doses of 50, 100, 200 and 400 mg per kg body weight reduced the number of abdominal constrictions by 33.3, 40.7, 48.1, and 55.6%, respectively. A standard pain relieving (analgesic) drug, aspirin, reduced the number of writhings by 48.1 and 63.0%, respectively, when administered at doses of 200 and 400 mg per kg body weight. Conclusion. Antihyperglycemic and antinociceptive activities have not previously been reported for Trevesia palmata leaves. The leaves can be beneficial in lowering blood sugar and for alleviating pain.
    WORLD JOURNAL OF PHARMACY AND PHARMACEUTICAL SCIENCES 10/2014; 3(10):91-101. · 2.79 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In oral glucose tolerance tests with methanolic extract of Dendrocalamus giganteus aerial parts (MEDG), the extract dose-dependently reduced blood glucose concentrations in glucose-loaded mice. At extract doses of 50, 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg, the reductions in blood glucose levels were, respectively, 9.9, 31.7, 43.5, and 53.4%. In comparison, a standard antihyperglycemic drug, glibenclamide, when administered at a dose of 10 mg per kg, reduced blood glucose level by 50.8%. In analgesic activity tests with acetic acid induced pain model mice, the extract at the afore-mentioned four doses, dose-dependently reduced acetic acid induced abdominal constrictions in mice by 11.1, 22.2, 44.4, and 51.9% versus the 40.7 and 51.9% reductions obtained with a standard analgesic drug, aspirin, administered respectively, at doses of 200 and 400 mg per kg. The extract when administered to mice did not cause any acute toxicity when administered at doses up to 3000 mg per kg. Preliminary phytochemical screening of the extract showed the presence of alkaloids, flavonoids, saponins and tannins, which compounds may be responsible for the observed antihyperglycemic and analgesic effects.
    Journal of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Research. 09/2014; 6(9):397-402.
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    ABSTRACT: Xanthosoma violaceum is commonly observed in fallow areas of Bangladesh but almost no scientific studies exist on this plant. Rural people consume the plant on a frequent basis. The objective of this study was to scientifically analyze the antinociceptive property of methanol extract of aerial parts of the plant along with antihyperglycemic activity.
    BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine 09/2014; 14(1):335. · 2.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUNDS Curcuma longa is a plant whose rhizomes are used commonly as a spice, and the plant cultivated widely in the Indian sub-continent and many other countries of the world. The rhizomes reportedly possess glucose lowering and analgesic properties. The leaves of the plant are discarded; it was of interest to determine the antihyperglycemic and analgesic properties of the leaves. METHODS Antihyperglycemic activity was determined through oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT). Antinociceptive activity was determined by observed decreases in abdominal constrictions (writhings) in intraperitoneally administered acetic acid-induced pain model in mice. RESULTS Administration of methanol extract of whole plant led to dose-dependent reductions in blood glucose levels in glucose-loaded mice. At doses of 50, 100, 200 and 400 mg per kg body weight, the extract dose-dependently reduced blood glucose levels by 12.9, 21.7, 24.7, and 30.8%, respectively compared to control animals. By comparison, a standard antihyperglycemic drug, glibenclamide, when administered at a dose of 10 mg per kg body weight, reduced blood glucose level by 35.4%. In antinociceptive activity tests, the extract at doses of 50, 100, 200 and 400 mg per kg body weight reduced the number of abdominal constrictions by 24.1, 27.6, 31.0, and 34.5%, respectively. A standard pain relieving (antinociceptive) drug, aspirin, reduced the number of writhings by 31.0 and 51.7%, respectively, when administered at doses of 200 and 400 mg per kg body weight. CONCLUSION Antihyperglycemic and antinociceptive activities have not previously been reported for Curcuma longa leaves. The leaves can be a readily available mean for lowering blood sugar and for alleviating pain.
    WORLD JOURNAL OF PHARMACY AND PHARMACEUTICAL SCIENCES 09/2014; 3(9):81-91. · 2.79 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Rosmarinic acid is an ester of caffeic acid and 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl lactic acid commonly found in plants belonging to the Boraginaceae and the subfamily Nepetoideae of the Lamiaceae family. The compound has a number of important biological activities, e.g. antiviral, antibacterial, antiinflammatory, anticancer and antioxidant. This review shall focus on the reported anticancer activities of rosmarinic acid and discuss its therapeutic potential against a variety of cancers including colon and skin cancer.
    WORLD JOURNAL OF PHARMACY AND PHARMACEUTICAL SCIENCES 09/2014; 3(9):57-70. · 2.79 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), methanol extract of Raphanus sativus roots, when administered orally to glucose-loaded Swiss albino mice at doses of 50, 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg body weight led to dosedependent reductions in blood glucose levels. At these doses, the percent reductions in blood glucose levels were, respectively, 21.9, 34.0, 39.7, and 53.9% compared to control animals. A standard antihyperglycemic drug, glibenclamide, when administered at a dose of 10 mg/kg body weight reduced blood glucose levels by 49.2%. Preliminary phytochemical screening showed presence of alkaloids, flavonoids, and saponins in the extract, which components can be responsible for the observed blood glucose lowering effect.
    World Journal of Pharmaceutical Research 09/2014; 3(6):2013-2017. · 5.05 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Hazaribagh is an area within Dhaka city, the capital of Bangladesh. Thousands of skins of animals like cows, goats, lambs, and buffaloes are processed at this site on a daily basis, the meat of these animals being used to serve the needs of around 16 million people of Dhaka. Since proper treatment of wastes are not conducted at the site, the soil of the area and surrounding water bodies like a canal and the Rivers Buriganga and Turag have been heavily contaminated with tannery waste toxic products. It was of interest to find out the plants growing on the contaminated site and water bodies, and determine through perusal of published literature as to whether these plants have phytoremediation potential, for then these plants can offer a cheap and viable alternative to clean up the waste site. A total of 21 plants distributed into 19 families were observed to be growing at the contaminated area and surrounding water bodies. A search of the scientific literature showed that most of these plants have reported phytoremediation potentials. It is concluded that these plants can form an alternative towards removing tannery wastes from the contaminated area(s), which removal can provide health benefits to the people residing in the area.
    Advances in Environmental Biology 07/2014; 8(12):242-246.
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    ABSTRACT: Alternanthera sessilis is used by folk medicinal practitioners of Bangladesh for alleviation of severe pain. The objective of this study was to scientifically analyze the analgesic (non-narcotic) property of aerial parts of the plant along with antihyperglycemic activity.
    BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine 05/2014; 14(1):169. · 2.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Ipomoea mauritiana (Family: Convolvulaceae) is a commonly used Ayurvedic medicinal plant of Bangladesh. The tubers of the plant are rich in carbohydrate and phytochemicals. It has a broad range of uses in folk medicine and contains pharmacological properties. It is used for increasing appetite, anti-aging, stimulant, carminative, tonic, blackening the hair, anti-oxidant, skin diseases, analgesic, hepatoprotection and as well as to treat sexually transmitted diseases. The present study was conducted to develop a method for in vitro callus induction of this vine to create a source of medicinally important phytochemicals. Young stems collected from field grown plants were cultured onto Murashige-Skoog's (MS) medium following surface sterilization with 0.1% HgCl2 containing different concentrations of 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP), 2, 4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (2, 4-D), 1-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA); Kinetin (Kn), indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), indole-3-butyric acid (IBA),3% sugar and 7% agar. The callus growth was best in BAP [2.0 mg/l] when fortified in MS medium among the tested concentrations of BAP. It showed whitish green, granular and hard calluses in the medium. 2, 4-D [1.0 mg/l] supplemented in MS medium showed a good response for inducing callogenesis with the formation of light brown and loose calluses. Among the synergistic actions of auxin-cytokinins, quick and fastest callus growth was observed with a highest callus diameter in MS + 2, 4-D [0.5 mg/l] + BAP [1.0 mg/l]. Root organogenesis was obtained when the MS was enriched with IBA [0.5 and 1.5mg/l]. The role of phytohormones observed in the study can be used for large-scale in vitro production of calluses of this species from which important phytochemicals can possibly be obtained.
    American-Eurasian Journal of Sustainable Agriculture 04/2014; 8(5):86-93.
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    ABSTRACT: Xanthium indicum stem is used in folk medicine of Bangladesh to control sugar in diabetic patients and to alleviate pain. The objective of the study was to evaluate antihyperglycemic and antinociceptive activity of methanolic extract of Xanthium indicum stems (XISE) in mice. Antihyperglycemic activity was measured by oral glucose tolerance tests in glucose-loaded Swiss albino mice. Antinociceptive activity was determined by observed decreases in abdominal constrictions in acetic acid-induced gastric pain model in mice. The methanol extract of stems showed dose-dependent and statistically significant antihyperglycemic activity at doses of 50, 100, 200 and 400 mg per kg body weight (p values, respectively, < than 0.01, 0.01, 0.005, and 0.01). Highest reduction in blood glucose level (31.2%) was observed with the highest dose (400 mg) of the extract. A standard antihyperglycemic drug, glibenclamide, reduced blood glucose levels by 46.2%, when administered at a dose of 10 mg per kg body weight. In antinociceptive activity tests, the extract when administered at the afore-mentioned four doses, reduced the number of abdominal constrictions in mice, respectively, by 41.7, 50.0, 54.2, and 61.0%. In comparison, a standard antinociceptive drug, aspirin, when administered at a dose of 200 mg per kg body weight, reduced the number of abdominal constrictions by 37.5%. The experimental results obtained in the present study validate the use of X. indicum stems in folk medicines of Bangladesh to lower blood sugar in diabetic patients and to alleviate pain.
    BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine 10/2013; 13(1):296. · 2.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Amaranthus tricolor whole plants are used by folk medicinal practitioners of Bangladesh for treatment of pain, anaemia, dysentery, skin diseases, diabetes, and as a blood purifier. Thus far, no scientific studies have evaluated the antihyperglycaemic and antinociceptive effects of the plant. The present study was carried out to evaluate the possible glucose tolerance efficacy of methanolic extracts of A. tricolour whole plants using glucose-induced hyperglycaemic mice, and antinociceptive effects with acetic acid-induced gastric pain models in mice. In antihyperglycaemic activity tests, the extract at different doses was administered one hour prior to glucose administration and blood glucose level was measured after two hours of glucose administration (p.o.) using glucose oxidase method. The statistical data indicated the significant oral hypoglycaemic activity on glucose-loaded mice at all doses of the extracts tested. Maximum antihyperglycaemic activity was shown at 400 mg extract per kg body weight, which was comparable to that of a standard drug, glibenclamide (10 mg/kg body weight). In antinociceptive activity tests, the extract also demonstrated a dose-dependent significant reduction in the number of writhings induced in mice through intraperitoneal administration of acetic acid. Maximum antinociceptive activity was observed at a dose of 400 mg extract per kg body weight, which compared favourably with that of a standard antinociceptive drug, aspirin, when administered at a dose of 200 mg per kg body weight. The results validate the folk medicinal use of the plant for reduction of blood sugar in diabetic patients as well as the folk medicinal use for alleviation of pain. The results suggest that this plant may possess further potential for scientific studies leading to possible discovery of efficacious antihyperglycaemic and antinociceptive components.
    African Journal of Traditional, Complementary and Alternative Medicines 01/2013; 10(5):408-11. · 0.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Diabetes is a debilitating disease affecting millions of people worldwide for which allopathic medicine has no known complete cure. Since the disease is projected to rise, significant scientific interest has focused on the plant kingdom towards discovery of newer anti-hyperglycemic drugs. The objective of the present research was to evaluate in oral glucose tolerance tests, the anti-hyperglycemic potential of methanol extract of Curcuma zedoaria rhizomes and fruits of Sonneratia caseolaris, both of which are used as anti-diabetics in the folk medicinal system of Bangladesh. Methanolic extract of rhizomes, when orally administered to glucose-loaded mice significantly and dose-dependently reduced concentrations of serum glucose. At extract doses of 50, 100, 200 and 400 mg per kg body weight serum glucose concentrations were reduced by, respectively, 36.9, 39.4, 41.1 and 55.1%. In comparison, a standard anti-hyperglycemic drug, glibenclamide reduced serum glucose concentration by 63.9% at a dose of 10 mg per kg body weight. Methanol extract of fruits also significantly and dose-dependently reduced serum glucose concentrations following administration, but the percent reductions were less than that obtained with rhizomes. At same doses of extract, serum glucose concentrations were reduced by 19.3, 27.6, 28.6 and 41.4%, respectively. The demonstrated anti-hyperglycemic activities by rhizomes of C. zedoaria and fruits of S. caseolaris validate their folk medicinal uses and warrants further studies towards elucidation of responsible phytochemical components, which can be potentially more efficacious drugs for treatment of diabetes.
    International Journal of PharmTech Research 03/2012; 4(1-CODEN (USA): IJPRIF ISSN : 0974-4304):125-129.
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    ABSTRACT: To study the antihyperglycemic and antinociceptive activities of methanolic extract of the whole plant of Euphorbia thymifolia L., a plant used in folk medicine of Bangladesh for treatment of diabetes and pain. Antihyperglycemic activity studies were conducted in glucose-loaded mice by oral glucose tolerance tests. Mice were given various doses of the extract, followed by glucose (2 g/kg body weight), 1 h after administration of the extract. Serum glucose levels were measured 2 h after glucose administration. Antinociceptive activity studies were conducted in intraperitoneally acetic acid-injected mice through measurement of reductions in abdominal writhing times caused by acetic acid-induced gastric pain. Following a period of 1 h after oral administration of various doses of the extract, all mice received intraperitoneal injection of 1% acetic acid at a dose of 10 mL/kg body weight. To ensure bioavailability of acetic acid, a period of 5 min was given to each animal following which period the number of writhings was counted for 10 min. The extract caused a significant dose-dependent reduction in serum glucose levels in mice, when administered at doses of 50, 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg body weight as compared to the control animals (P<0.05). The highest reduction of serum glucose (60.5%) was observed at a dose of 400 mg/kg. In comparison, a standard antihyperglycemic drug glibenclamide, when administered at a dose of 10 mg/kg body weight, lowered serum glucose levels by 48.6%. The extract also demonstrated a significant dose-dependent antinociceptive activity compared to control animals (P<0.05). At a dose of 400 mg/kg body weight, the number of abdominal writhings was inhibited by 40.9% as compared to 49.0% inhibition obtained with a standard antinociceptive drug aspirin, administered at a dose of 200 mg/kg body weight. The significant antihyperglycemic and antinociceptive activities demonstrated by the extract validate the use of E. thymifolia in folk medicine of Bangladesh for treatment of diabetes and pain, and merit further scientific studies leading to discovery of efficacious drugs.
    Journal of Chinese Integrative Medicine 02/2012; 10(2):228-32.
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    ABSTRACT: Averrhoa carambola L. (Oxalidaceae), Ficus hispida L.f. (Moraceae), and Syzygium samarangense (Blume) Merr. & L.M. Perry (Myrtaceae) are three common plants in Bangladesh, the fruits of which are edible. The leaves and fruits of A. carambola and F. hispida are used by folk medicinal practitioners for treatment of diabetes, while the leaves of S. samarangense are used for treatment of cold, itches, and waist pain. Since scientific studies are absent on the antihyperglycemic effects of the leaves of the three plants, it was the objective of the present study to evaluate the antihyperglycemic potential of methanolic extract of leaves of the plants in oral glucose tolerance tests carried out with glucose-loaded mice. The extracts at different doses were administered one hour prior to glucose administration and blood glucose level was measured after two hours of glucose administration (p.o.) using glucose oxidase method. Significant oral hypoglycemic activity was found with the extracts of leaves of all three plants tested. The fall in serum glucose levels were dose-dependent for every individual plant, being highest at the highest dose tested of 400 mg extract per kg body weight. At this dose, the extracts of A. carambola, F. hispida, and S. samarangense caused, respectively, 34.1, 22.7, and 59.3% reductions in serum glucose levels when compared to control animals. The standard antihyperglycemic drug, glibenclamide, caused a 57.3% reduction in serum glucose levels versus control. Among the three plants evaluated, the methanolic extract of leaves of S. samarangense proved to be the most potent in demonstrating antihyperglycemic effects. The result validates the folk medicinal uses of A. carambola and F. hispida in the treatment of diabetes, and indicates that the leaves of S. samarangense can also possibly be used for amelioration of diabetes-induced hyperglycemia.
    African Journal of Traditional, Complementary and Alternative Medicines 01/2012; 9(2):287-91. · 0.52 Impact Factor
  • African Journal of Traditional, Complementary and Alternative Medicines 01/2012; · 0.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Nypa fruticans Wurmb. (Arecaceae) is a mangrove palm well-known for its traditional uses by the local practitioners against different ailments in southern regions of Bangladesh. However, the plant is yet to be scientifically studied. The present study was done to evaluate the anti-hyperglycemic and antinociceptive potential of methanolic extract of leaf and stem of Nypa fruticans Wurmb. (MENF). The anti-hyperglycemic activity was tested on glucose loaded hyperglycemic mice whereas antinociceptive activity was evaluated using a model of acetic acid-induced writhing in mice. The crude MENF was found to show significant oral anti-hyperglycemic activity on glucose loaded mice at every dose. Maximum anti-hyperglycemic activity was observed at a dose of 500 mg MENF/kg body weight, which was more than what was obtained with a standard drug glibenclamide at a dose of 10 mg glibenclamide/kg body weight). Significant antinociceptive activity was also demonstrated by MENF in acetic acid-induced writhing mice model. The extract caused a maximum of 39.88% (p<0.001) inhibition of writhing at the dose of 600 mg/kg body weight, which was better than the result obtained with a standard drug (200 mg aspirin/kg body weight, 49.34% inhibition). These findings indicate that MENF has significant anti-hyperglycemic and antinociceptive activity and thus have great potential as a source of natural products.
    Pakistan journal of pharmaceutical sciences 10/2011; 24(4):485-8. · 0.95 Impact Factor
  • Advances in Natural and Applied Sciences 01/2011; 5(2).
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    ABSTRACT: The objective of the present study was to investigate the antinociceptive and anti-hyperglycemic activity of methanolic leaf extract of Cyperus scariosus. Antinociceptive activity was determined using a model of acetic acid-induced gastric pain in mice and anti-hyperglycemic activity through glucose tolerance test using glucose loaded mice. In writhing assays induced by acetic acid, the methanolic leaf extract showed dose dependent significant pain inhibition compared to control. The maximum writhing inhibition (46.62%) was found at a dose of 200 mg/kg body weight which was less than that of the positive control, aspirin (56.74%), when used at the same dose. Anti-hyperglycemic activity of the extract was also found to be significant in mice loaded with glucose at doses of 200 and 400 mg/kg body weight. Maximum tolerance (42.86%) was showed at 400 mg extract/kg body weight, which compared favorably with that of glibenclamide at 10 mg/kg body weight (57.62%). In summary, the methanol extract of C. scariosus leaves has had beneficial effects as a pain reliever and also in reducing the elevated blood glucose level of hyperglycemic mice.
    Pakistan journal of pharmaceutical sciences 01/2011; 24(1):53-6. · 0.95 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The antinociceptive effect of crude methanol extracts of stems and leaves of Areca catechu L. (Arecaceae) was evaluated in acetic acid-induced gastric pain writhing model in Swiss albino mice. The methanol extract of Areca catechu stems dose-dependently reduced the number of writhings (constrictions) in mice, when tested at doses of 50, 100, 200, and 400 mg extract administered per kg body weight. Significant reductions in the number of writhings were noted with all administered doses. The percent inhibitions of acetic acid-induced writhings with the four different doses were, respectively, 30.8, 36.6, 40.9 and 59.6. The standard antinociceptive drug, aspirin, when administered at doses of 200 and 400 mg per kg body weight reduced writhings by 42.3 and 55.8%, respectively. A significant dose-dependent inhibition of writhings was also observed with crude methanol extract of Areca catechu leaves, where the extract at doses of 50, 100, 200 and 400 mg per kg body weight significantly inhibited writhings by 55.8, 57.7, 86.5 and 88.5%, respectively. Dose for dose, the leaf extract demonstrated higher antinociceptive activity than the stem extract. At even the lowest dose of 50 mg extract per kg body weight, the antinociceptive activity of leaf extract was comparable to that of 400 mg aspirin per kg body weight. The results suggest that both stem and leaf extract possess good antinociceptive activity, which merits further scientific studies as to isolation of responsible phytochemical component(s).
    Advances in Natural and Applied Sciences 01/2011; 5:223-226.