Satyakant Chitturi

Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, MA, United States

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Publications (3)1.75 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: To determine if central corneal thickness (CCT) impacts the intraocular pressure (IOP)-lowering effect of selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT) in patients with ocular hypertension (OHT) and primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG). A retrospective chart review of consecutive patients, who underwent SLT as primary treatment for OHT and POAG, between 2002 and 2005, was performed. Partial correlation analysis was performed to correlate the CCT to the percentage of IOP reduction at 3 to 30 months after SLT. Independent samples t test was performed to compare mean percentage of IOP reduction in eyes with CCT less than 555 μm versus CCT 555 μm or greater. Eighty eyes of 47 patients were identified. The partial correlation coefficient value between the CCT and percentage of IOP reduction after SLT at 3 months was -0.253 (P = 0.025), at 12 months it was -0.22 (P = 0.049), and at 30 months it was 0.301 (P = 0.007). Independent samples t test showed that the mean percentage of IOP reduction in eyes with thinner corneas (CCT < 555 μm) was greater than that in thicker corneas (CCT ≥ 555 μm) at 3-, 6-, 9-, 12-, and 30-month post-SLT (P < 0.05). In patients with POAG and OHT, percentage of IOP reduction after SLT was significantly greater in eyes with thinner corneas (CCT < 555 μm). These findings indicate that patients treated with SLT as primary therapy who had thinner corneas demonstrated better IOP control for at least 30 months after SLT.
    Cornea 04/2012; 31(8):883-6. · 1.75 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To determine if pseudophakia affects selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT) intraocular pressure (IOP) lowering effect. A retrospective chart review was performed on 94 eyes of 75 consecutive patients who underwent SLT as primary treatment for ocular hypertension and primary open-angle glaucoma between 2002 and 2005 and completed at least 30 months follow up. Patients were excluded if they required additional glaucoma medications, laser, or ocular surgery during the follow-up period. Patients were categorized as phakics or pseudophakics. Independent-samples t-test was performed to compare the mean percentage of IOP reduction at 3, 6, 12, 18, and 30 months after SLT between the phakic and pseudophakic groups. Seventy-six phakic and 18 pseudophakic eyes were included. IOP reduction in phakic group was 27.4% (2 week), 29.8% (3 months), 27.7% (9 months), 27.4% at (12 months) and 27.3% at (30 months). In pseudophakic patients, the mean IOP reduction was 19.8% (2 weeks), 26.5% (3 months), 23.2% (9 months), 22.5% (12 months), and 25.9% (30 months). An independent-sample t-test compared the percentage of IOP reduction between the phakic and pseudophakic groups and revealed higher percentage of IOP reduction in the phakic group at 2 weeks by 7.6% (P = 0.01). P value for difference was 0.34 (3 months), 0.25 (6 months), 0.18 (9 months), 0.12 (12 months), 0.36 (18 months), and 0.7 (30 months) after SLT. SLT response was delayed in pseudophakic compared to phakic patients, while the long-term effectiveness of SLT is the same in both groups.
    Clinical Ophthalmology 01/2011; 5:377-80.
  • Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology; 01/2010

Publication Stats

7 Citations
1.75 Total Impact Points

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Institutions

  • 2012
    • Boston Children's Hospital
      • Department of Ophthalmology
      Boston, MA, United States
  • 2011
    • Harvard Medical School
      Boston, Massachusetts, United States