Sandesh C S Nagamani

Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, United States

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Publications (32)190.49 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Purpose:The aim of this study was to examine predictors of ammonia exposure and hyperammonemic crises in patients with urea cycle disorders.Methods:The relationships between fasting ammonia, daily ammonia exposure, and hyperammonemic crises were analyzed in >100 patients with urea cycle disorders.Results:Fasting ammonia correlated strongly with daily ammonia exposure (r = 0.764; P < 0.001). For patients with fasting ammonia concentrations <0.5 upper limit of normal (ULN), 0.5 to <1.0 ULN, and ≥1.0 ULN, the probability of a normal average daily ammonia value was 87, 60, and 39%, respectively, and 10.3, 14.1, and 37.0% of these patients, respectively, experienced ≥1 hyperammonemic crisis over 12 months. Time to first hyperammonemic crisis was shorter (P = 0.008) and relative risk (4.5×; P = 0.011) and rate (~5×, P = 0.006) of hyperammonemic crises were higher in patients with fasting ammonia ≥1.0 ULN vs. <0.5ULN; relative risk was even greater (20×; P = 0.009) in patients ≥6 years old. A 10- or 25-µmol/l increase in ammonia exposure increased the relative risk of a hyperammonemic crisis by 50 and >200% (P < 0.0001), respectively. The relationship between ammonia and hyperammonemic crisis risk seemed to be independent of treatment, age, urea cycle disorder subtype, dietary protein intake, or blood urea nitrogen. Fasting glutamine correlated weakly with daily ammonia exposure assessed as 24-hour area under the curve and was not a significant predictor of hyperammonemic crisis.Conclusion:Fasting ammonia correlates strongly and positively with daily ammonia exposure and with the risk and rate of hyperammonemic crises, suggesting that patients with urea cycle disorder may benefit from tight ammonia control.Genet Med advance online publication 11 December 2014Genetics in Medicine (2014); doi:10.1038/gim.2014.148.
    Genetics in medicine: official journal of the American College of Medical Genetics 12/2014; · 3.92 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Sodium phenylbutyrate (NaPBA) is a commonly used medication for the treatment of patients with urea cycle disorders (UCDs). Previous reports involving small numbers of patients with UCDs have shown that NaPBA treatment can result in lower plasma levels of the branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) but this has not been studied systematically. From a large cohort of patients (n = 553) with UCDs enrolled in Longitudinal Study of Urea Cycle Disorders, a collaborative multicenter study of the Urea Cycle Disorders Consortium, we evaluated whether treatment with NaPBA leads to a decrease in plasma BCAA levels. Our analysis shows that NaPBA use independently affects the plasma BCAA levels even after accounting for multiple confounding covariates. Moreover, NaPBA use increases the risk for BCAA deficiency. This effect of NaPBA seems specific to plasma BCAA levels, as levels of other essential amino acids are not altered by its use. Our study, in an unselected population of UCD subjects, is the largest to analyze the effects of NaPBA on BCAA metabolism and potentially has significant clinical implications. Our results indicate that plasma BCAA levels should to be monitored in patients treated with NaPBA since patients taking the medication are at increased risk for BCAA deficiency. On a broader scale, they could open avenues to explore NaPBA as a therapy in maple syrup urine disease and other common complex disorders with dysregulation of BCAA metabolism.
    Molecular Genetics and Metabolism 09/2014; · 2.83 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: New human mutations are thought to originate in germ cells, thus making a recurrence of the same mutation in a sibling exceedingly rare. However, increasing sensitivity of genomic technologies has anecdotally revealed mosaicism for mutations in somatic tissues of apparently healthy parents. Such somatically mosaic parents might also have germline mosaicism that can potentially cause unexpected intergenerational recurrences. Here, we show that somatic mosaicism for transmitted mutations among parents of children with simplex genetic disease is more common than currently appreciated. Using the sensitivity of individual-specific breakpoint PCR, we prospectively screened 100 families with children affected by genomic disorders due to rare deletion copy-number variants (CNVs) determined to be de novo by clinical analysis of parental DNA. Surprisingly, we identified four cases of low-level somatic mosaicism for the transmitted CNV in DNA isolated from parental blood. Integrated probabilistic modeling of gametogenesis developed in response to our observations predicts that mutations in parental blood increase recurrence risk substantially more than parental mutations confined to the germline. Moreover, despite the fact that maternally transmitted mutations are the minority of alleles, our model suggests that sexual dimorphisms in gametogenesis result in a greater proportion of somatically mosaic transmitting mothers who are thus at increased risk of recurrence. Therefore, somatic mosaicism together with sexual differences in gametogenesis might explain a considerable fraction of unexpected recurrences of X-linked recessive disease. Overall, our results underscore an important role for somatic mosaicism and mitotic replicative mutational mechanisms in transmission genetics.
    The American Journal of Human Genetics 07/2014; · 11.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), the most common neonatal gastrointestinal emergency, results in significant mortality and morbidity, yet its pathogenesis remains unclear. Argininosuccinate lyase (ASL) is the only enzyme in mammals that is capable of synthesizing arginine. Arginine has several homeostatic roles in the gut and its deficiency has been associated with NEC. Since enterocytes are the primary sites of arginine synthesis in neonatal mammals, we evaluated the consequences of disruption of arginine synthesis in the enterocytes on the pathogenesis of NEC. We devised a novel approach to study the role of enterocyte-derived ASL in NEC by generating and characterizing a mouse model with enterocyte-specific deletion of Asl (Asl (flox/flox); VillinCre(tg/+) or CKO). We hypothesized that the presence of ASL in a cell-specific manner in the enterocytes is protective in the pathogenesis of NEC. Loss of ASL in enterocytes resulted in an increased incidence of NEC that was associated with a pro-inflammatory state and increased enterocyte apoptosis. Knockdown of ASL in intestinal epithelial cell lines resulted in decreased migration in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Our results show that the enterocyte-derived ASL has a protective role in the NEC.
    American journal of physiology. Gastrointestinal and liver physiology. 06/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) metabolism plays a central role in the pathophysiology of both rare inborn errors of metabolism and the more common multi-factorial diseases. Although deficiency of the branched-chain ketoacid dehydrogenase (BCKDC) and associated elevations in the BCAAs and their ketoacids have been recognized as the cause of maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) for decades, treatment options for this disorder have been limited to dietary interventions. In recent years, the discovery of improved leucine tolerance after liver transplantation has resulted in a new therapeutic strategy for this disorder. Likewise, targeting the regulation of the BCKDC activity may be an alternative potential treatment strategy for MSUD. The regulation of the BCKDC by the branched-chain ketoacid dehydrogenase kinase (BCKDK) has also been implicated in a new inborn error of metabolism characterized by autism, intellectual disability, and seizures. Lastly, there is a growing body of literature implicating BCAA metabolism in more common disorders such as the metabolic syndrome, cancer, and hepatic disease. This review surveys the knowledge acquired on the topic over the past 50 years and focuses on recent developments in the field of BCAA metabolism.
    Human Molecular Genetics 03/2014; · 7.69 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background. Adults with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) have a high risk of fracture. Currently, few treatment options are available, and bone anabolic therapies have not been tested in clinical trials for OI treatment. Methods. 79 adults with OI were randomized to receive 20 μg recombinant human parathyroid hormone (teriparatide) or placebo for 18 months in a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. The primary endpoint was the percent change in areal bone mineral density (aBMD) of the lumbar spine (LS), as determined by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Secondary endpoints included percent change in bone remodeling markers and vertebral volumetric BMD (vBMD) by quantitative computed tomography, estimated vertebral strength by finite element analysis, and self-reported fractures. Results. Compared with the placebo group, the teriparatide group showed increased LS aBMD (6.1% ± 1.0% vs. 2.8% ± 1.0% change from baseline; P < 0.05) and total hip aBMD (2.6% ± 1.0% vs. -2.4% ± 1.0% change; P < 0.001). Vertebral vBMD and strength improved with teriparatide therapy (18% ± 6% and 15% ± 3% change, respectively), but declined with placebo (-5.0% ± 6% and -2.0% ± 3% change; P < 0.05 for both comparisons). Serum procollagen type 1 N-terminal propeptide (P1NP) and urine collagen N-telopeptide (NTx) levels increased with teriparatide therapy (135% ± 14% and 64% ± 10% change, respectively). Teriparatide-induced elevation of P1NP levels was less pronounced in severe forms of OI (type III/IV) compared with the milder form (type I). Type I OI patients exhibited robust BMD increases with teriparatide; however, there was no observed benefit for those with type III/IV OI. There was no difference in self-reported fractures between the 2 groups. Conclusions. Adults with OI, particularly those with less severe disease (type I), displayed a teriparatide-induced anabolic response, as well as increased hip and spine aBMD, vertebral vBMD, and estimated vertebral strength. Trial registration. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00131469. Funding. The Osteoporosis Imperfecta Foundation, Eli Lilly and Co., the National Center for Advancing Translational Science (NCATS) at the NIH (grant no. UL1RR024140), and the Baylor College of Medicine General Clinical Research Center (grant no. RR00188).
    The Journal of clinical investigation 01/2014; · 15.39 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective To evaluate glycerol phenylbutyrate (GPB) in the treatment of pediatric patients with urea cycle disorders (UCDs). Study Design UCD patients (n = 26) ages 2 months through 17 years were treated with GPB and sodium phenylbutyrate (NaPBA) in two short-term, open-label crossover studies, which compared 24-hour ammonia exposure (AUC0-24) and glutamine levels during equivalent steady-state dosing of GPB and sodium phenylbutyrate (NaPBA). These 26 patients plus an additional 23 patients also received GPB in one of three 12-month, open label extension studies, which assessed long-term ammonia control, hyperammonemic (HA) crises, amino acids levels, and patient growth. Results Mean ammonia exposure on GPB was non-inferior to NaPBA in each of the individual crossover studies. In the pooled analyses, it was significantly lower on GPB vs. NaPBA (mean [SD] AUC0-24: 627 [302] vs. 872 [516] μmol/L; p = 0.008) with significantly fewer abnormal values (15% on GPB vs. 35% on NaPBA; p = 0.02). Mean ammonia levels remained within the normal range during 12 months of GPB dosing and, when compared with the 12 months preceding enrollment, a smaller percentage of patients (24.5% vs. 42.9%) experienced fewer (17 vs. 38) HA crises. Glutamine levels tended to be lower with GPB than with NaPBA during short-term dosing (mean [SD]: 660.8 [164.4] vs. 710.0 [158.7] μmol/L; p = 0.114) and mean glutamine and branched chain amino acids levels, as well as other essential amino acids, remained within the normal range during 12 months of GPB dosing. Mean height and weight Z-scores were within normal range at baseline and did not change significantly during 12 months of GPB treatment. Conclusions Dosing with GPB was associated with 24-hour ammonia exposure that was non-inferior to that during dosing with NaPBA in individual studies and significantly lower in the pooled analysis. Long-term GPB dosing was associated with normal levels of glutamine and essential amino acids, including branched chain amino acids, age-appropriate growth and fewer HA crises as compared with the 12 month period preceding enrollment.
    Molecular Genetics and Metabolism 01/2014; · 2.83 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Phenylacetic acid (PAA) is the active moiety in sodium phenylbutyrate (NaPBA) and glycerol phenylbutyrate (GPB, HPN-100). Both are approved for treatment of urea cycle disorders (UCDs) - rare genetic disorders characterized by hyperammonemia. PAA is conjugated with glutamine in the liver to form phenylacetyleglutamine (PAGN), which is excreted in urine. PAA plasma levels≥500μg/dL have been reported to be associated with reversible neurological adverse events (AEs) in cancer patients receiving PAA intravenously. Therefore, we have investigated the relationship between PAA levels and neurological AEs in patients treated with these PAA pro-drugs as well as approaches to identifying patients most likely to experience high PAA levels. The relationship between nervous system AEs, PAA levels and the ratio of plasma PAA to PAGN were examined in 4683 blood samples taken serially from: [1] healthy adults [2], UCD patients of ≥2months of age, and [3] patients with cirrhosis and hepatic encephalopathy (HE). The plasma ratio of PAA to PAGN was analyzed with respect to its utility in identifying patients at risk of high PAA values. Only 0.2% (11) of 4683 samples exceeded 500μg/ml. There was no relationship between neurological AEs and PAA levels in UCD or HE patients, but transient AEs including headache and nausea that correlated with PAA levels were observed in healthy adults. Irrespective of population, a curvilinear relationship was observed between PAA levels and the plasma PAA:PAGN ratio, and a ratio>2.5 (both in μg/mL) in a random blood draw identified patients at risk for PAA levels>500μg/ml. The presence of a relationship between PAA levels and reversible AEs in healthy adults but not in UCD or HE patients may reflect intrinsic differences among the populations and/or metabolic adaptation with continued dosing. The plasma PAA:PAGN ratio is a functional measure of the rate of PAA metabolism and represents a useful dosing biomarker.
    Molecular Genetics and Metabolism 10/2013; · 2.83 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To achieve an efficient molecular diagnosis of osteogenesis imperfecta (OI), Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS), and osteopetrosis (OPT), we designed a next-generation sequencing (NGS) platform to sequence 34 genes. We validated this platform on known cases and have successfully identified the causative mutation in most patients without a prior molecular diagnosis. INTRODUCTION: Osteogenesis imperfecta, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, and osteopetrosis are collectively common inherited skeletal diseases. Evaluation of subjects with these conditions often includes molecular testing which has important counseling and therapeutic and sometimes legal implications. Since several different genes have been implicated in these conditions, Sanger sequencing of each gene can be a prohibitively expensive and time-consuming way to reach a molecular diagnosis. METHODS: In order to circumvent these problems, we have designed and tested a NGS platform that would allow simultaneous sequencing on a single diagnostic platform of different genes implicated in OI, OPT, EDS, and other inherited conditions, leading to low or high bone mineral density. We used a liquid-phase probe library that captures 602 exons (~100 kb) of 34 selected genes and have applied it to test clinical samples from patients with bone disorders. RESULTS: NGS of the captured exons by Illumina HiSeq 2000 resulted in an average coverage of over 900X. The platform was successfully validated by identifying mutations in six patients with known mutations. Moreover, in four patients with OI or OPT without a prior molecular diagnosis, the assay was able to detect the causative mutations. CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, our NGS panel provides a fast and accurate method to arrive at a molecular diagnosis in most patients with inherited high or low bone mineral density disorders.
    Osteoporosis International 02/2013; · 4.04 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of our study is to familiarize the reader with genetic disorders commonly seen in adults and identify challenges and barriers that limit provision of services. We conducted a retrospective chart analysis of patients seen in the adult Genetics clinics from January 2004 to December 2010 in a metropolitan medical center consisting of an academic private clinic and a county hospital clinic. During the study period, a total of 1,552 patients (n = 1,108 private clinic patients; n = 444 county clinic patients) were evaluated and managed. Of these, 790 and 280 were new patient visits at the private clinic and county clinic, respectively. Approximately 35% (374/1,070) of new patients were seen for cancer-related indications, while neurological indications accounted for approximately 14% (153/1,070) in both clinics. Cardiology-related indications accounted for approximately 13% (145/1,070) of patients, followed closely by chromosomal and syndromic indications for which almost 9% (96/1,070) of new patients were seen. Approximately 8% (90/1,070) of new patients were seen for musculoskeletal indications. We saw increased clinic growth during the study period and found that the most common indications for referral are: (1) Personal/family history of cancer (2) neurological (3) cardiovascular (CV) (4) chromosomal/syndromic and (5) musculoskeletal. A number of challenges were identified, including coordination of services, feasibility of testing, and an overall higher complexity of care with increased clinic scheduling time requirements. Through this review, we demonstrate the demand for adult genetics services and propose some guidelines to address the challenges of management in the adult genetics patient population. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    American Journal of Medical Genetics Part A 12/2012; · 2.30 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To compare the effects of combinatorial therapy with low-dose arginine and a nitrogen scavenging agent (sodium phenylbutyrate) vs. monotherapy with high-dose arginine on liver function tests in patients with argininosuccinic aciduria (ASA). STUDY DESIGN: Twelve patients with ASA were enrolled in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study design. Subjects were randomized to receive either a low-dose of arginine therapy (100mg·kg(-1)·d(-1)) combined with sodium phenylbutyrate (500mg·kg(-1)·d(-1)) (LDA arm) or a high-dose of arginine alone (500mg·kg(-1)·d(-1)) (HDA arm) for one week. At the end of one week of therapy, liver function tests were assessed and metabolite fluxes were measured using a multi-tracer stable isotope protocol. RESULTS: Plasma aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and measures of synthetic functions of the liver were the primary outcomes. Subjects had significantly increased levels of argininosuccinate (P<0.03) and AST levels (P<0.01) after treatment with high-dose arginine. In the subset of subjects with elevated AST or ALT, treatment with high-dose of arginine was associated with further increases in plasma levels of both aminotransferases. Whereas subjects had increased arginine and citrulline flux with high-dose arginine therapy, the glutamine flux was not different between the two treatment arms. The synthetic liver functions as assessed by prothrombin time, INR, and coagulation factor levels were not different between the HDA and LDA arms. CONCLUSIONS: Administering higher doses of arginine in subjects with ASA results in increases in AST and ALT levels, especially in the subset of patients with elevated baseline aminotransferases. Hence, low-dose arginine sufficient to normalize arginine levels in plasma combined with nitrogen scavenging therapy should be considered as a therapeutic option for treatment of ASA in patients with elevations of hepatic aminotransferases.
    Molecular Genetics and Metabolism 09/2012; · 2.83 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Fragile X syndrome, the most common form of X-linked intellectual disability, results from transcriptional silencing of the FMR1 gene. As of yet, the phenotypic consequences of the duplication of FMR1 have not been well characterized. In this report, we characterize the clinical features in two females with duplications involving only the FMR1 gene. In addition, we describe the phenotypes of two subjects with deletion of FMR1 and show that both loss and gain of FMR1 copy number can lead to overlapping neurodevelopmental phenotypes. Our report supports the notion that FMR1 gene dosage is important for normal neurocognitive function.
    Neurogenetics 08/2012; 13(4):333-9. · 3.58 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Small genomic rearrangements and copy-number variations (CNVs) involving a single gene have been associated recently with many neurocognitive phenotypes, including intellectual disability (ID), behavioral abnormalities, and autistic spectrum disorders (ASDs). Such small CNVs in the Autism susceptibility candidate 2 (AUTS2) gene have been shown to be associated with seizures, ID, and ASDs. We report four patients with small CNVs ranging in size between 133-319 kb that disrupt AUTS2. Two patients have duplications involving single exons, whereas two have deletions that removed multiple exons. All patients had developmental delay, whereas two patients had a diagnosis of ASDs. The CNVs were detected by an exon-targeted array CGH with dense oligonucleotide coverage in exons of genes known or hypothesized to be causative of multiple human phenotypes. Our report further shows that disruption of AUTS2 results in a variety of neurobehavioral phenotypes. More importantly, it demonstrates the utility of targeted exon array as a highly sensitive clinical diagnostic tool for the detection of small genomic rearrangements in the clinically relevant regions of the human genome.European Journal of Human Genetics advance online publication, 8 August 2012; doi:10.1038/ejhg.2012.157.
    European journal of human genetics: EJHG 08/2012; · 3.56 Impact Factor
  • Sandesh C S Nagamani, Ayelet Erez, Brendan Lee
    Genetics in medicine: official journal of the American College of Medical Genetics 06/2012; 14(6):628. · 3.92 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Argininosuccinate lyase (ASL) is required for the synthesis and channeling of L-arginine to nitric oxide synthase (NOS) for nitric oxide (NO) production. Congenital ASL deficiency causes argininosuccinic aciduria (ASA), the second most common urea-cycle disorder, and leads to deficiency of both ureagenesis and NO production. Subjects with ASA have been reported to develop long-term complications such as hypertension and neurocognitive deficits despite early initiation of therapy and the absence of documented hyperammonemia. In order to distinguish the relative contributions of the hepatic urea-cycle defect from those of the NO deficiency to the phenotype, we performed liver-directed gene therapy in a mouse model of ASA. Whereas the gene therapy corrected the ureagenesis defect, the systemic hypertension in mice could be corrected by treatment with an exogenous NO source. In an ASA subject with severe hypertension refractory to antihypertensive medications, monotherapy with NO supplements resulted in the long-term control of hypertension and a decrease in cardiac hypertrophy. In addition, the NO therapy was associated with an improvement in some neuropsychological parameters pertaining to verbal memory and nonverbal problem solving. Our data show that ASA, in addition to being a classical urea-cycle disorder, is also a model of congenital human NO deficiency and that ASA subjects could potentially benefit from NO supplementation. Hence, NO supplementation should be investigated for the long-term treatment of this condition.
    The American Journal of Human Genetics 04/2012; 90(5):836-46. · 11.20 Impact Factor
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    Sandesh C S Nagamani, Ayelet Erez, Brendan Lee
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    ABSTRACT: The urea cycle consists of six consecutive enzymatic reactions that convert waste nitrogen into urea. Deficiencies of any of these enzymes of the cycle result in urea cycle disorders (UCDs), a group of inborn errors of hepatic metabolism that often result in life-threatening hyperammonemia. Argininosuccinate lyase (ASL) catalyzes the fourth reaction in this cycle, resulting in the breakdown of argininosuccinic acid to arginine and fumarate. ASL deficiency (ASLD) is the second most common UCD, with a prevalence of ~1 in 70,000 live births. ASLD can manifest as either a severe neonatal-onset form with hyperammonemia within the first few days after birth or as a late-onset form with episodic hyperammonemia and/or long-term complications that include liver dysfunction, neurocognitive deficits, and hypertension. These long-term complications can occur in the absence of hyperammonemic episodes, implying that ASL has functions outside of its role in ureagenesis and the tissue-specific lack of ASL may be responsible for these manifestations. The biochemical diagnosis of ASLD is typically established with elevation of plasma citrulline together with elevated argininosuccinic acid in the plasma or urine. Molecular genetic testing of ASL and assay of ASL enzyme activity are helpful when the biochemical findings are equivocal. However, there is no correlation between the genotype or enzyme activity and clinical outcome. Treatment of acute metabolic decompensations with hyperammonemia involves discontinuing oral protein intake, supplementing oral intake with intravenous lipids and/or glucose, and use of intravenous arginine and nitrogen-scavenging therapy. Dietary restriction of protein and dietary supplementation with arginine are the mainstays in long-term management. Orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) is best considered only in patients with recurrent hyperammonemia or metabolic decompensations resistant to conventional medical therapy.
    Genetics in medicine: official journal of the American College of Medical Genetics 01/2012; 14(5):501-7. · 3.92 Impact Factor
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    Molecular Genetics and Metabolism - MOL GENET METAB. 01/2012;
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    ABSTRACT: Nitric oxide (NO) is crucial in diverse physiological and pathological processes. We show that a hypomorphic mouse model of argininosuccinate lyase (encoded by Asl) deficiency has a distinct phenotype of multiorgan dysfunction and NO deficiency. Loss of Asl in both humans and mice leads to reduced NO synthesis, owing to both decreased endogenous arginine synthesis and an impaired ability to use extracellular arginine for NO production. Administration of nitrite, which can be converted into NO in vivo, rescued the manifestations of NO deficiency in hypomorphic Asl mice, and a nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-independent NO donor restored NO-dependent vascular reactivity in humans with ASL deficiency. Mechanistic studies showed that ASL has a structural function in addition to its catalytic activity, by which it contributes to the formation of a multiprotein complex required for NO production. Our data demonstrate a previously unappreciated role for ASL in NOS function and NO homeostasis. Hence, ASL may serve as a target for manipulating NO production in experimental models, as well as for the treatment of NO-related diseases.
    Nature medicine 11/2011; 17(12):1619-26. · 27.14 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Submicroscopic deletions involving chromosome 1q43-q44 result in cognitive impairment, microcephaly, growth restriction, dysmorphic features, and variable involvement of other organ systems. A consistently observed feature in patients with this deletion are the corpus callosal abnormalities (CCAs), ranging from thinning and hypoplasia to complete agenesis. Previous studies attempting to delineate the critical region for CCAs have yielded inconsistent results. We conducted a detailed clinical and molecular characterization of seven patients with deletions of chromosome 1q43-q44. Using array comparative genomic hybridization, we mapped the size, extent, and genomic content of these deletions. Four patients had CCAs, and shared the smallest region of overlap that contains only three protein coding genes, CEP170, SDCCAG8, and ZNF238. One patient with a small deletion involving SDCCAG8 and AKT3, and another patient with an intragenic deletion of AKT3 did not have any CCA, implying that the loss of these two genes is unlikely to be the cause of CCA. CEP170 is expressed extensively in the brain, and encodes for a protein that is a component of the centrosomal complex. ZNF238 is involved in control of neuronal progenitor cells and survival of cortical neurons. Our results rule out the involvement of AKT3, and implicate CEP170 and/or ZNF238 as novel genes causative for CCA in patients with a terminal 1q deletion.
    European journal of human genetics: EJHG 09/2011; 20(2):176-9. · 3.56 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Complex genomic rearrangements (CGRs) consisting of two or more breakpoint junctions have been observed in genomic disorders. Recently, a chromosome catastrophe phenomenon termed chromothripsis, in which numerous genomic rearrangements are apparently acquired in one single catastrophic event, was described in multiple cancers. Here, we show that constitutionally acquired CGRs share similarities with cancer chromothripsis. In the 17 CGR cases investigated, we observed localization and multiple copy number changes including deletions, duplications, and/or triplications, as well as extensive translocations and inversions. Genomic rearrangements involved varied in size and complexities; in one case, array comparative genomic hybridization revealed 18 copy number changes. Breakpoint sequencing identified characteristic features, including small templated insertions at breakpoints and microhomology at breakpoint junctions, which have been attributed to replicative processes. The resemblance between CGR and chromothripsis suggests similar mechanistic underpinnings. Such chromosome catastrophic events appear to reflect basic DNA metabolism operative throughout an organism's life cycle.
    Cell 09/2011; 146(6):889-903. · 31.96 Impact Factor