Sake J de Vlas

Erasmus Universiteit Rotterdam, Rotterdam, South Holland, Netherlands

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Publications (174)700.83 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: HIV and TB services are provided free-of-charge in many sub-Saharan African countries, but patients still incur costs. Patient-exit interviews were conducted with a representative sample of 200 HIV-infected patients not yet on ART (pre-ART), 300 ART patients, and 300 TB patients receiving public sector care in rural South Africa. For each group, we calculated health expenditures across different spending categories, time spent traveling to and utilizing services, and how patients financed their spending. Associations between patient group and costs were assessed in multivariate regression models. Total monthly health expenditures (7.3 South African Rand: 1 USD) were: 171 (95%CI 134-207) for pre-ART, 164 (95%CI 141-187) for ART, and 122 (95%CI 105-140) for TB patients. Total monthly time costs (in hours) were: 3.4 (95%CI 3.3-3.5) for pre-ART, 5.0 (95%CI 4.7-5.3) for ART and 3.2 (95%CI 2.9-3.4) for TB patients. Though costs were similar across groups, pre-ART patients spent significantly more on traditional healers, chemists, and private doctors, while ART and TB patients spent more on transport to clinic visits. 31% of pre-ART, 39% of ART and 41% of TB patients borrowed money or sold assets to finance health costs. Patients receiving nominally free care for HIV/TB face large private costs. Subsidized transport, fewer clinic visits, and drug pick-up points closer to home could reduce costs for ART patients, potentially improving adherence and retention. Large expenditure on alternative care among pre-ART patients suggests that transitioning patients to ART earlier, as under TASP, may not impose substantial costs on patients.
    JAIDS Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes 06/2015; DOI:10.1097/QAI.0000000000000728 · 4.39 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 has posed a significant threat to both humans and birds, and it has spanned large geographic areas and various ecological systems throughout Asia, Europe and Africa, but especially in mainland China. Great efforts in control and prevention of the disease, including universal vaccination campaigns in poultry and active serological and virological surveillance, have been undertaken in mainland China since the beginning of 2006. In this study, we aim to characterize the spatial and temporal patterns of HPAI H5N1, and identify influencing factors favoring the occurrence of HPAI H5N1 outbreaks in poultry in mainland China. Our study shows that HPAI H5N1 outbreaks took place sporadically after vaccination campaigns in poultry, and mostly occurred in the cold season. The positive tests in routine virological surveillance of HPAI H5N1 virus in chicken, duck, goose as well as environmental samples were mapped to display the potential risk distribution of the virus. Southern China had a higher positive rate than northern China, and positive samples were mostly detected from chickens in the north, while the majority were from duck in the south, and a negative correlation with monthly vaccination rates in domestic poultry was found (R = −0.19, p value = 0.005). Multivariate panel logistic regression identified vaccination rate, interaction between distance to the nearest city and national highway, interaction between distance to the nearest lake and wetland, and density of human population, as well as the autoregressive term in space and time as independent risk factors in the occurrence of HPAI H5N1 outbreaks, based on which a predicted risk map of the disease was derived. Our findings could provide new understanding of the distribution and transmission of HPAI H5N1 in mainland China and could be used to inform targeted surveillance and control efforts in both human and poultry populations to reduce the risk of future infections.
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 05/2015; 12(5-5):5026-5045. DOI:10.3390/ijerph120505026 · 1.99 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The neglected tropical disease (NTD) visceral leishmaniasis (VL) has been targeted by the WHO for elimination as a public health problem on the Indian subcontinent by 2017 or earlier. To date there is a surprising scarcity of mathematical models capable of capturing VL disease dynamics, which are widely considered central to planning and assessing the efficacy of interventions. The few models that have been developed are examined, highlighting the necessity for better data to parameterise and fit these and future models. In particular, the characterisation and infectiousness of the different disease stages will be crucial to elimination. Modelling can then assist in establishing whether, when, and how the WHO VL elimination targets can be met. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
    Trends in Parasitology 04/2015; 3(6). DOI:10.1016/j.pt.2015.03.007 · 6.22 Impact Factor
  • Wilma A Stolk, Chris Stone, Sake J de Vlas
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    ABSTRACT: Mathematical modelling provides a useful tool for policy making and planning in lymphatic filariasis control programmes, by providing trend forecasts based on sound scientific knowledge and principles. This is now especially true, in view of the ambitious target to eliminate lymphatic filariasis as a public health problem globally by the year 2020 and the short remaining timeline to achieve this. To meet this target, elimination programmes need to be accelerated, requiring further optimization of strategies and tailoring to local circumstances. Insights from epidemiological transmission models provide a useful basis. Two general models of lymphatic filariasis transmission and control are nowadays in use to support decision-making, namely a population-based deterministic model (EPIFIL) and an individual-based stochastic model (LYMFASIM). Model predictions confirm that lymphatic filariasis transmission can be interrupted by annual mass drug administration (MDA), but this may need to be continued much longer than the initially suggested 4-6 years in areas with high transmission intensity or poor treatment coverage. However, the models have not been validated against longitudinal data describing the impact of MDA programmes. Some critical issues remain to be incorporated in one or both of the models to make predictions on elimination more realistic, including the possible occurrence of systematic noncompliance, the risk of emerging parasite resistance to anthelmintic drugs, and spatial heterogeneities. Rapid advances are needed to maximize the utility of models in decision-making for the ongoing ambitious lymphatic filariasis elimination programmes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
    Advances in Parasitology 03/2015; 87:249-291. DOI:10.1016/bs.apar.2014.12.005 · 4.36 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Leprosy or Hansen's disease is an infectious disease caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium leprae. The annual number of new leprosy cases registered worldwide has remained stable over the past years at over 200,000. Early case finding and multidrug therapy have not been able interrupt transmission completely. Elimination requires innovation in control and sustained commitment. Mathematical models can be used to predict the course of leprosy incidence and the effect of intervention strategies. Two compartmental models and one individual-based model have been described in the literature. Both compartmental models investigate the course of leprosy in populations and the long-term impact of control strategies. The individual-based model focusses on transmission within households and the impact of case finding among contacts of new leprosy patients. Major improvement of these models should result from a better understanding of individual differences in exposure to infection and developing leprosy after exposure. Most relevant are contact heterogeneity, heterogeneity in susceptibility and spatial heterogeneity. Furthermore, the existing models have only been applied to a limited number of countries. Parameterization of the models for other areas, in particular those with high incidence, is essential to support current initiatives for the global elimination of leprosy. Many challenges remain in understanding and dealing with leprosy. The support of mathematical models for understanding leprosy epidemiology and supporting policy decision making remains vital. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
    Advances in Parasitology 03/2015; 87:33-51. DOI:10.1016/bs.apar.2014.12.002 · 4.36 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Female sex workers (FSWs) are highly vulnerable to HIV but make little use of HIV-related intervention services provided by the Chinese government. Determinants of the low uptake of HIV services by FSWs in Shenzhen, Guangdong province were investigated. Methods: FSWs were recruited by venue-based sampling; 1656 FSWs were interviewed about sociodemographics, behaviours and uptake of HIV-related intervention services. Determinants of no uptake of HIV testing, condom promotion, and peer education were determined through logistic regression. The association between uptake of HIV-related services, condom use and HIV-related knowledge was also assessed. Results: The overall uptake of HIV testing, condom promotion, and peer education by FSWs was 21.5%, 47.8% and 28.0%, respectively. Young age and shorter duration of working in Shenzhen were statistically significantly correlated with no uptake of all three interventions. Uptake of these services was positively associated with consistent condom use and good HIV-related knowledge. Conclusions: The uptake of HIV-related intervention services by FSWs is low in Shenzhen. As their uptake is positively associated with condom use and HIV-related knowledge, it is necessary to intensify promotion of these, focusing on young and recently started FSWs.
    Sexual Health 02/2015; DOI:10.1071/SH14189 · 1.58 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Knowledge of the natural history of human papillomavirus (HPV), in particular the role of immunity, is crucial in estimating the (cost-) effectiveness of HPV vaccination and cervical cancer screening strategies, because naturally acquired immunity after clearing an infection may already protect part of the risk population against new HPV infections. We used STDSIM, an established stochastic microsimulation model, quantified to the Netherlands. We explored different assumptions regarding the natural history of HPV-16 and HPV-18, and estimated the transmission probabilities and durations of acquired immunity necessary to reproduce age-specific prevalence. A model without acquired immunity cannot reproduce the age-specific patterns of HPV. Also, it is necessary to assume a high degree of individual variation in the duration of infection and acquired immunity. According to the model estimates, on average 20% of women are immune for HPV-16 and 15% for HPV-18. After an HPV-16 infection, 50% are immune for less than 1 year, whereas 20% exceed 30 years. For HPV-18, up to 12% of the individuals are immune for less than 1 year, and about 50% over 30 years. Almost half of all women will never acquire HPV-16 or HPV-18. Acquired immunity likely plays a major role in HPV epidemiology, but its duration shows substantial variation. Combined with the lifetime risk, this explains to a large extent why many women will never develop cervical cancer.
    PLoS ONE 02/2015; 10(2). DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0116618 · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) caused by hantaviruses and transmitted by rodents is a significant public health problem in China, and occurs more frequently in selenium-deficient regions. To study the role of selenium concentration in HFRS incidence we used a multidisciplinary approach combining ecological analysis with preliminary experimental data. The incidence of HFRS in humans was about six times higher in severe selenium-deficient and double in moderate deficient areas compared to non-deficient areas. This association became statistically stronger after correction for other significant environment-related factors (low elevation, few grasslands, or an abundance of forests) and was independent of geographical scale by separate analyses for different climate regions. A case-control study of HFRS patients admitted to the hospital revealed increased activity and plasma levels of selenium binding proteins while selenium supplementation in vitro decreased viral replication in an endothelial cell model after infection with a low multiplicity of infection (MOI). Viral replication with a higher MOI was not affected by selenium supplementation. Our findings indicate that selenium deficiency may contribute to an increased prevalence of hantavirus infections in both humans and rodents. Future studies are needed to further examine the exact mechanism behind this observation before selenium supplementation in deficient areas could be implemented for HFRS prevention.
    Viruses 01/2015; 7(1):333-51. DOI:10.3390/v7010333 · 3.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The African Programme for Onchocerciasis Control (APOC) is currently shifting its focus from morbidity control to elimination of infection. To enhance the likelihood of elimination and speed up its achievement, programs may consider to increase the frequency of ivermectin mass treatment from annual to 6-monthly or even higher. In a computer simulation study, we examined the potential impact of increasing the mass treatment frequency for different settings. With the ONCHOSIM model, we simulated 92,610 scenarios pertaining to different assumptions about transmission conditions, history of mass treatment, the future mass treatment strategy, and ivermectin efficacy. Simulation results were used to determine the minimum remaining program duration and number of treatment rounds required to achieve 99% probability of elimination. Doubling the frequency of treatment from yearly to 6-monthly or 3-monthly was predicted to reduce remaining program duration by about 40% or 60%, respectively. These reductions come at a cost of additional treatment rounds, especially in case of 3-monthly mass treatment. Also, aforementioned reductions are highly dependent on maintained coverage, and could be completely nullified if coverage of mass treatment were to fall in the future. In low coverage settings, increasing treatment coverage is almost just as effective as increasing treatment frequency. We conclude that 6-monthly mass treatment may only be worth the effort in situations where annual treatment is expected to take a long time to achieve elimination in spite of good treatment coverage, e.g. because of unfavorable transmission conditions or because mass treatment started recently.
    PLoS ONE 12/2014; 9(12):e115886. DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0115886 · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Men who have sex with men (MSM) are a key population for HIV control and prevention in China. It is difficult to acquire representative samples of this hidden population. Respondent-driven sampling (RDS), based on peer referral, and time-location sampling (TLS) based on random selection of venue-day-time periods, are among the most commonly used sampling methods. However, differences in HIV-related characteristics of MSM recruited by these two methods have not been fully evaluated. We compared sociodemographics, risk behaviors, utilization of HIV-related intervention services, and HIV/syphilis infection rates between samples of 621 RDS MSM and 533 TLS MSM in Shenzhen, China in 2010. We found that the HIV prevalence was comparable in RDS and TLS MSM. TLS recruited larger proportions of more marginalized MSM than RDS: MSM recruited by TLS were older, less educated and more likely to be migrants (without Shenzhen hukou registration), to be non-gay identified and to engage in risky sexual behaviors. On the other hand, MSM recruited by TLS were more likely to have been covered by HIV-related intervention services. To conclude, in Shenzhen, TLS is more effective to reach the marginalized population of MSM. But because TLS can only reach MSM who physically attend venues and HIV-related intervention services are already commonly available at gay venues in Shenzhen, RDS is more informative for allocating prevention efforts than TLS. Furthermore, researchers and public health authorities should take into account the different sample compositions of RDS and TLS and apply sampling methods consistently when evaluating trends over time.
    Archives of Sexual Behavior 09/2014; DOI:10.1007/s10508-014-0350-y · 3.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background Since the end of the 1990s, the incidence of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) has been increasing dramatically in Changchun, northeastern China. However, it is unknown which, and how, underlying risk factors have been involved in the reemergence of the disease. Methods Data on HFRS cases at the county scale were collected from 1998 to 2012. Data on livestock husbandry including the numbers of large animals (cattle, horses, donkeys and mules), sheep, and deer, and on climatic and land cover variables were also collected. Epidemiological features, including the spatial, temporal and human patterns of disease were characterized. The potential factors related to spatial heterogeneity and temporal trends were analyzed using standard and time-series Poisson regression analysis, respectively. Results Annual incidence varied among the 10 counties. Shuangyang County in southeastern Changchun had the highest number of cases (1,525 cases; 35.9% of all cases), but its population only accounted for 5.6% of the total population. Based on seasonal pattern in HFRS incidence, two epidemic phases were identified. One was a single epidemic peak at the end of each year from 1988 to 1997 and the other consisted of dual epidemic peaks at both the end and the beginning of each year from 1998 to the end of the study period. HFRS incidence was higher in males compared to females, and most of the HFRS cases occurred in peasant populations. The results of the Poisson regression analysis indicated that the spatial distribution and the increasing incidence of HFRS were significantly associated with livestock husbandry and climate factors, particularly with deer cultivation. Conclusions Our results indicate that the re-emergence of HFRS in Changchun has been accompanied by changing seasonal patterns over the past 25 years. Integrated measures focusing on areas related to local livestock husbandry could be helpful for the prevention and control of HFRS.
    BMC Infectious Diseases 06/2014; 14(1):301. DOI:10.1186/1471-2334-14-301 · 2.56 Impact Factor
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    PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases 06/2014; 8(6):e2759. DOI:10.1371/journal.pntd.0002759 · 4.49 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) is an emerging infectious disease discovered in rural areas of Central China in 2009, caused by a novel bunyavirus, SFTS virus (SFTSV). The disease usually presents as fever, thrombocytopenia, and leukocytopenia, with case-fatality rates ranging from 2.5% to 30%. Haemaphysalis longicornis was suspected to be the most likely vector of SFTSV. By the end of 2012, the disease had expanded to 13 provinces of China. SFTS patients have been reported in Japan and South Korea, and a disease similar to SFTS has been reported in the United States. We characterized the epidemiologic features of 504 confirmed SFTS cases in Xinyang Region, the most severely SFTS-afflicted region in China from 2011 to 2012, and assessed the environmental risk factors. All cases occurred during March to November, with the epidemic peaking from May to July. The patients' ages ranged from 7 to 87 years (median 61 years), and the annual incidence increased with age (χ2 test for trend, P<0.001). The female-to-male ratio of cases was 1.58, and 97.0% of the cases were farmers who resided in the southern and western parts of the region. The Poisson regression analysis revealed that the spatial variations of SFTS incidence were significantly associated with the shrub, forest, and rain-fed cropland areas. The distribution of SFTS showed highly significant temporal and spatial heterogeneity in Xinyang Region, with the majority of SFTS cases being elderly farmers who resided in the southern and western parts of the region, mostly acquiring infection between May and July when H. longicornis is highly active. The shrub, rain-fed, and rain-fed cropland areas were associated with high risk for this disease.
    PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases 05/2014; 8(5):e2820. DOI:10.1371/journal.pntd.0002820 · 4.49 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Men who have sex with men and women (MSMW) may expand the HIV epidemic from men who have sex with men to the female population. From a respondent-driven sampling survey in Shenzhen, China, we quantified the burden of HIV/syphilis and studied patterns of risk and prevention behaviors in 107 MSMW, and compared these with those of 542 men who have sex with men only (MSM-only). HIV prevention behaviors and consistent condom use with male partners did not differ between the two groups. However, HIV risk behaviors were more common among MSMW than MSM-only. Moreover, among MSMW, the HIV prevalence was as high as 6 % and consistent condom use was extremely low with female partners in MSMW. We conclude that there is risk of HIV transmission from MSMW to the female population. Special efforts are needed to convince MSMW they should refrain from HIV risk behaviors.
    AIDS and Behavior 03/2014; DOI:10.1007/s10461-014-0735-x · 3.49 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Several countries with generalized, high-prevalence HIV epidemics, mostly in sub-Saharan Africa, have experienced rapid declines in transmission. These HIV epidemics, often with rapid onsets, have generally been attributed to a combination of factors related to high-risk sexual behavior. The subsequent declines in these countries began prior to widespread therapy or implementation of any other major biomedical prevention. This change has been construed as evidence of behavior change, often on the basis of mathematical models, but direct evidence for behavior changes that would explain these declines is limited. Here, we look at the structure of current models and argue that the common "fixed risk per sexual contact" assumption favors the conclusion of substantial behavior changes. We argue that this assumption ignores reported non-linearities between exposure and risk. Taking this into account, we propose that some of the decline in HIV transmission may be part of the natural dynamics of the epidemic, and that several factors that have traditionally been ignored by modelers for lack of precise quantitative estimates may well hold the key to understanding epidemiologic trends.
    PLoS Computational Biology 03/2014; 10(3):e1003459. DOI:10.1371/journal.pcbi.1003459 · 4.83 Impact Factor
  • Jan A C Hontelez, Sake J de Vlas
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    ABSTRACT: To the Editor: We applaud the recent modeling study by Walensky et al. (Oct. 31 issue)(1) as a compelling argument that, in principle, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) treatment as prevention is cost-effective. However, the authors model only first- and second-order transmissions, thereby ignoring the dynamics of the full sexual network. Recent studies have shown that this modeling approach overestimates the effect of treatment as prevention, because many infections come from other parts of the network.(2),(3) Using the same assumptions regarding the effectiveness of antiretroviral therapy (ART) as Walensky et al., we reran our simulation model of the South African ...
    New England Journal of Medicine 02/2014; 370(6):581. DOI:10.1056/NEJMc1314998#SA1 · 54.42 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: High rates of partner change in 'upstream' sex work networks have long been recognized to drive 'downstream' transmission of sexually transmitted infections (STIs). We used a stochastic microsimulation model (STDSIM) to explore such transmission dynamics in a generalized African HIV epidemic. We refined the quantification of sex work in Kisumu, Kenya, from the 4-cities study. Interventions with sex workers were introduced in 2000 and epidemics projected to 2020. We estimated the contribution of sex work to transmission, and modelled standard condom and STI interventions for three groups of sex workers at feasible rates of use and coverage. Removing transmission from sex work altogether would have resulted in 66% lower HIV incidence (range 54-75%) and 56% lower prevalence (range 44-63%) after 20 years. More feasible interventions reduced HIV prevalence from one-fifth to one-half. High rates of condom use in sex work had the greatest effect, whereas STI treatment contributed to HIV declines at lower levels of condom use. Interventions reaching the 40% of sex workers with most clients reduced HIV transmission nearly as much as less targeted approaches attempting to reach all sex workers. Declines were independent of antiretroviral therapy rollout and robust to realistic changes in parameter values. 'Upstream' transmission in sex work remains important in advanced African HIV epidemics even in the context of antiretroviral therapy. As in concentrated Asian epidemics, feasible condom and STI interventions that reach the most active sex workers can markedly reduce the size of HIV epidemics. Interventions targeting 'transactional' sex with fewer clients have less impact.
    AIDS (London, England) 01/2014; 28(6). DOI:10.1097/QAD.0000000000000176 · 6.56 Impact Factor
  • BMC Infectious Diseases 01/2014; 14(Suppl 2):P19. DOI:10.1186/1471-2334-14-S2-P19 · 2.56 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background New WHO guidelines recommend initiation of antiretroviral therapy for HIV-positive adults with CD4 counts of 500 cells per μL or less, a higher threshold than was previously recommended. Country decision makers have to decide whether to further expand eligibility for antiretroviral therapy accordingly. We aimed to assess the potential health benefits, costs, and cost-effectiveness of various eligibility criteria for adult antiretroviral therapy and expanded treatment coverage. Methods We used several independent mathematical models in four settings—South Africa (generalised epidemic, moderate antiretroviral therapy coverage), Zambia (generalised epidemic, high antiretroviral therapy coverage), India (concentrated epidemic, moderate antiretroviral therapy coverage), and Vietnam (concentrated epidemic, low antiretroviral therapy coverage)—to assess the potential health benefits, costs, and cost-effectiveness of various eligibility criteria for adult antiretroviral therapy under scenarios of existing and expanded treatment coverage, with results projected over 20 years. Analyses assessed the extension of eligibility to include individuals with CD4 counts of 500 cells per μL or less, or all HIV-positive adults, compared with the previous (2010) recommendation of initiation with CD4 counts of 350 cells per μL or less. We assessed costs from a health-system perspective, and calculated the incremental cost (in US$) per disability-adjusted life-year (DALY) averted to compare competing strategies. Strategies were regarded very cost effective if the cost per DALY averted was less than the country's 2012 per-head gross domestic product (GDP; South Africa: $8040; Zambia: $1425; India: $1489; Vietnam: $1407) and cost effective if the cost per DALY averted was less than three times the per-head GDP. Findings In South Africa, the cost per DALY averted of extending eligibility for antiretroviral therapy to adult patients with CD4 counts of 500 cells per μL or less ranged from $237 to $1691 per DALY averted compared with 2010 guidelines. In Zambia, expansion of eligibility to adults with a CD4 count threshold of 500 cells per μL ranged from improving health outcomes while reducing costs (ie, dominating the previous guidelines) to $749 per DALY averted. In both countries results were similar for expansion of eligibility to all HIV-positive adults, and when substantially expanded treatment coverage was assumed. Expansion of treatment coverage in the general population was also cost effective. In India, the cost for extending eligibility to all HIV-positive adults ranged from $131 to $241 per DALY averted, and in Vietnam extending eligibility to patients with CD4 counts of 500 cells per μL or less cost $290 per DALY averted. In concentrated epidemics, expanded access for key populations was also cost effective. Interpretation Our estimates suggest that earlier eligibility for antiretroviral therapy is very cost effective in low-income and middle-income settings, although these estimates should be revisited when more data become available. Scaling up antiretroviral therapy through earlier eligibility and expanded coverage should be considered alongside other high-priority health interventions competing for health budgets.
  • BMC Infectious Diseases 01/2014; 14(Suppl 2):P26. DOI:10.1186/1471-2334-14-S2-P26 · 2.56 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

4k Citations
700.83 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1992–2015
    • Erasmus Universiteit Rotterdam
      • Department of Public Health (MGZ)
      Rotterdam, South Holland, Netherlands
  • 2010–2014
    • Erasmus MC
      • Department of Public Health
      Rotterdam, South Holland, Netherlands
  • 2013
    • University of KwaZulu-Natal
      • Africa Centre for Health and Population Studies
      Port Natal, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa
  • 2007–2012
    • Beijing Institute of Microbiology and Epidemiology
      Peping, Beijing, China
  • 2006–2011
    • London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine
      Londinium, England, United Kingdom
    • Radboud University Nijmegen
      • Department of Medical Microbiology
      Nijmegen, Provincie Gelderland, Netherlands
  • 2009
    • Imperial College London
      • Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology
      Londinium, England, United Kingdom
  • 2004
    • Institute of Tropical Medicine
      Antwerpen, Flemish, Belgium
  • 2002–2004
    • Leiden University
      Leyden, South Holland, Netherlands
  • 1999
    • Shanghai University
      Shanghai, Shanghai Shi, China
  • 1998
    • Shanghai Medical University
      • Department of Epidemiology
      Shanghai, Shanghai Shi, China