Susana Tabernero

Hospital Príncipe De Asturias, Madrid, Madrid, Spain

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Publications (10)24.45 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: To determine the prevalence of immune-mediated inflammatory diseases (IMID) in a cohort of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) enrolled in hospital gastroenterology outpatients units for the AQUILES study, a prospective 2-year follow-up study. We included patients ≥18 years old with a prior or new diagnosis of IBD (Crohn disease [CD], ulcerative colitis [UC] or indeterminate colitis). Diagnoses were collected in a cross-sectional manner from the clinical records at enrollment of a new patient in the study. We included 526 patients (mean age 40.2 years; 47.3% men, 52.7% women), 300 with CD (57.0%), 218 with UC (41.4%) and 8 with indeterminate colitis. Other types of IMID were present in 71 patients (prevalence: 13.5%, 95% CI: 10.8-16.7): 47 were spondyloarthropathies (prevalence: 8.9%); 18 psoriasis (3.4%); 5 pyoderma gangrenosum (1.0%), and 11 uveitis (2.1%). The prevalence of IMID was higher in patients with CD than in those with UC (17.0% [95% CI: 13.2-21.7] vs 9.2% [95% CI: 6.0-13.8], p=0.011). In the multivariate analysis, the variables associated with the presence of IMID were diagnosis of CD (OR=1.8 [95% CI: 1.1-3.2]) and duration of IBD ≥4 years (OR=2.1 [95% CI: 1.1-4.1] in those with disease duration 4-8 years, and OR=2.1 [95% CI: 1.2-3.9] in those with ≥8 years vs. <4 years). In the cohort of patients with IBD in the AQUILES study, 13.5% had another IMID, with a higher prevalence in patients with CD and>4 years since disease onset.
    Gastroenterología y Hepatología 04/2014; 37(9). DOI:10.1016/j.gastrohep.2014.02.010 · 0.83 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective To determine the prevalence of immune-mediated inflammatory diseases (IMID) in a cohort of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) enrolled in hospital gastroenterology outpatients units for the AQUILES study, a prospective 2-year follow-up study. Material and methods We included patients ≥ 18 years old with a prior or new diagnosis of IBD (Crohn disease [CD], ulcerative colitis [UC] or indeterminate colitis). Diagnoses were collected in a cross-sectional manner from the clinical records at enrollment of a new patient in the study. Results We included 526 patients (mean age 40.2 years; 47.3% men, 52.7% women), 300 with CD (57.0%), 218 with UC (41.4%) and 8 with indeterminate colitis. Other types of IMID were present in 71 patients (prevalence: 13.5%, 95% CI: 10.8-16.7): 47 were spondyloarthropathies (prevalence: 8.9%); 18 psoriasis (3.4%); 5 pyoderma gangrenosum (1.0%), and 11 uveitis (2.1%). The prevalence of IMID was higher in patients with CD than in those with UC (17.0% [95% CI: 13.2-21.7] vs 9.2% [95% CI: 6.0-13.8], p = 0.011). In the multivariate analysis, the variables associated with the presence of IMID were diagnosis of CD (OR = 1.8 [95% CI: 1.1-3.2]) and duration of IBD ≥ 4 years (OR = 2.1 [95% CI: 1.1-4.1] in those with disease duration 4-8 years, and OR = 2.1 [95% CI: 1.2-3.9] in those with ≥ 8 years vs. < 4 years). Conclusions In the cohort of patients with IBD in the AQUILES study, 13.5% had another IMID, with a higher prevalence in patients with CD and > 4 years since disease onset.
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    ABSTRACT: Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is a commonly used and fairly sensitive method of assessing changes of chronic pancreatitis (CP) when routine noninvasive imaging has not shown overt features of CP. The aim of this study is to evaluate the interobserver agreement (IOA) for the classic (MSC) and the Rosemont (RC) criteria for the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis on the basis of clinical practice. Two experienced endosonographers evaluated on the same day patients referred for EUS in a blinded fashion. Data from the sonographic criteria of both MSC and RC were collected. Agreement was calculated using k statistics. A total of 69 patients were evaluated. The study population included mainly patients without pancreatic diseases, resulting in a low number of sonographic findings. Agreement for the final diagnosis was moderate for both classification systems of chronic pancreatitis (k = 0.53 for conventional and k = 0.46 for Rosemont). The IOA of EUS in the diagnosis of CP is moderate. The concordance values obtained in clinical practice are similar to those obtained in multicenter studies. The RC does not seem to improve the IOA of MSC.
    Pancreatology 05/2012; 12(3):284-7. DOI:10.1016/j.pan.2012.03.054 · 2.50 Impact Factor
  • Inflammatory Bowel Diseases 01/2012; 18:S37. DOI:10.1097/00054725-201212001-00087 · 5.48 Impact Factor
  • Inflammatory Bowel Diseases 01/2012; 18:S36-S37. DOI:10.1097/00054725-201212001-00086 · 5.48 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is a very sensitive and specific technique for the diagnosis of biliary diseases. This procedure has proven its usefulness in cases of high suspicion of biliary disease (history of gallstones and dilatation of the intrahepatic and/or extrahepatic bile ducts). We know less about its usefulness in cases of low suspicion of biliary pathology.The aim of this study was to assess the diagnostic accuracy of EUS in patients with low suspicion of biliary disease (patients with dilatation of the biliary tract were excluded). 33 patients with low suspicion of biliary disease were recruited in 12 months. All of them had no biliary findings in a previous abdominal ultrasound and computer tomography scan. All of them underwent EUS and were studied prospectively. The diagnosis was confirmed by surgery and/or by ERCP in patients with positive EUS or clinical follow-up in those with normal EUS. Time of follow-up was 9 months (range, 3-12 months). seventeen patients (51.5%) presented with abnormal biliary findings on EUS (7 choledocholithiasis, 3 cholelithiasis, 2 choledocholithiasis + cholelithiasis and 5 microlithiasis). EUS is a useful and safe procedure for diagnosing patients with low suspicion of biliary disease.
    Revista espanola de enfermedades digestivas: organo oficial de la Sociedad Espanola de Patologia Digestiva 07/2011; 103(7):345-8. DOI:10.4321/S1130-01082011000700002 · 1.32 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background and aims: endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is a very sensitive and specific technique for the diagnosis of biliary diseases. This procedure has proven its usefulness in cases of high suspicion of biliary disease (history of gallstones and dilatation of the intrahepatic and/or extrahepatic bile ducts). We know less about its usefulness in cases of low suspicion of biliary pathology. The aim of this study was to assess the diagnostic accuracy of EUS in patients with low suspicion of biliary disease (patients with dilatation of the biliary tract were excluded). Methods: 33 patients with low suspicion of biliary disease were recruited in 12 months. All of them had no biliary findings in a previous abdominal ultrasound and computer tomography scan. All of them underwent EUS and were studied prospectively. The diagnosis was confirmed by surgery and/or by ERCP in patients with positive EUS or clinical follow-up in those with normal EUS. Time of follow-up was 9 months (range, 3-12 months). Results: seventeen patients (51.5%) presented with abnormal biliary findings on EUS (7 choledocholithiasis, 3 cholelithiasis, 2 choledocholithiasis + cholelithiasis and 5 microlithiasis). Conclusion: EUS is a useful and safe procedure for diagnosing patients with low suspicion of biliary disease.
    Revista espanola de enfermedades digestivas: organo oficial de la Sociedad Espanola de Patologia Digestiva 07/2011; 103(7):345-348. · 1.32 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Evaluation of the impact of EUS in clinical practice. All exploration performed during the first 18 months of implementation of the technique were analyzed. Agreement was assessed by radiographic techniques or surgical specimens in those cases allowed. 277 exploration were performed. There have been only 2 complications and they were related to sedation in both cases. The demand increased gradually, reaching 70 scans per 100,000 inhabitants. Main indications were bile (34.3%) and pancreatic processes. No pathology was found in 10% of cases; 29 cases had choledocholithiasis (93% confirmed and treated endoscopically). Chronic pancreatitis was diagnosed in 19 cases (only 15.78% of the cases were diagnosed by computed tomography). 32 patients with idiopathic acute pancreatitis were evaluated: 20 of them had evidence of microlithiasis (80% cholecystectomized and asymptomatic after a mean follow-up of 21.5 months), two cases of choledocholithiasis, 1 with chronic pancreatitis and 9 cases remained free of filial etiology. We performed 56 punctures: 39 samples of pancreas in 33 patients (81.1% of the samples were diagnostic; adenocarcinoma and serous cystadenoma were the most common diagnoses), 13 enlarged nodes and 4 abdominal masses. EUS is a growing demand technique that has low risks and leads to better decision-making in a significant number of patients with different diseases. Therefore, its inclusion in routine clinical practice must be considered.
    Revista espanola de enfermedades digestivas: organo oficial de la Sociedad Espanola de Patologia Digestiva 12/2010; 102(12):698-703. DOI:10.4321/S1130-01082010001200004 · 1.32 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives: Evaluation of the impact of EUS in clinical practice. Methods: All exploration performed during the first 18 months of implementation of the technique were analyzed. Agreement was assessed by radiographic techniques or surgical specimens in those cases allowed. Results: 277 exploration were performed. There have been only 2 complications and they were related to sedation in both cases. The demand increased gradually, reaching 70 scans per 100,000 inhabitants. Main indications were bile (34.3%) and pancreatic processes. No pathology was found in 10% of cases; 29 cases had choledocholithiasis (93% confirmed and treated endoscopically). Chronic pancreatitis was diagnosed in 19 cases (only 15.78% of the cases were diagnosed by computed tomography). 32 patients with idiopathic acute pancreatitis were evaluated: 20 of them had evidence of microlithiasis (80% cholecystectomized and asymptomatic after a mean follow-up of 21.5 months), two cases of choledocholithiasis, 1 with chronic pancreatitis and 9 cases remained free of filial etiology. We performed 56 punctures: 39 samples of pancreas in 33 patients (81.1% of the samples were diagnostic; adenocarcinoma and serous cystadenoma were the most common diagnoses), 13 enlarged nodes and 4 abdominal masses. Conclusions: EUS is a growing demand technique that has low risks and leads to better decision-making in a significant number of patients with different diseases. Therefore, its inclusion in routine clinical practice must be considered.
    Revista espanola de enfermedades digestivas: organo oficial de la Sociedad Espanola de Patologia Digestiva 12/2010; 102(12):698-703. · 1.32 Impact Factor
  • David Del Pozo, Susana Tabernero, Elvira Poves
    Gastrointestinal Endoscopy 04/2010; 71(5). DOI:10.1016/j.gie.2010.03.689 · 4.90 Impact Factor